Tag: birthday

7 Quotes From ‘Rise of the Guardians’ Author William Joyce to Brighten Your Day

As an artist, writer, and filmmaker, William Joyce’s artful imagination is to thank for many beloved childhood stories and films. With a vast imagination, Joyce has written and illustrated over fifty children books, including Rolie Polie Olie, turned into a TV series of the same name, and A Day with Wilbur Robinson, which was adapted into the film titled Meet the Robinsons. Most recently, Joyce has been working on the Guardians of Childhood series which sparked the film adaptation Rise of the Guardians. The series currently has five books but will wrap up with a total of thirteen.

Joyce has proved resilient through difficult times, using his art to evoke healing and light in times of darkness, not only for himself, but for all of those who indulge in his work. Here are 7 times Joyce’s words made life a little lighter…

 

 

“But if you really love to write and you really love to tell stories and you really love to draw, you just have to keep doing it no matter what anybody says.”

 

“Life is made up of danger and heartbreak, I laugh in the face of both!”

IMAGE VIA WILLIAMJOYCE.COM

“The thing about artists is a lot of times they end up being successful because they aren’t trying to make money. They are just trying to be true to their vision and that touches people.”

 

 

“Old friends sometimes need no words to understand each other.”

 

“In my stories there is a sense that there will always be losses in life, but you power through them. If you lose something that you love, the memory of that love will sustain you and never die.”

 

IMAGE VIA CARTOON BREW

“I think all wishes are the same, really,” she continued. “Whether they ask for this, that, or the other, what they are really asking for is happiness.”

 

“Whether you want to call it a higher source or the human spirit, whatever it is, I am lucky it’s a part of me… My art is what saved me.”

 

Happy birthday William Joyce, thanks for reminding us to keep moving forward!

 

 

 

Image Via Commonplace grace
FEATURED IMAGE VIA SCHREVEPORTTIMES

 

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Celebrate Shel Silverstein’s Birthday!

Shel Silverstein is possibly one of the most famous children’s authors in literature, famed thanks to being the author of the world renowned The Giving Tree and Where the Sidewalk Ends.

 

 

A musician and poet in addition to being a children’s author, Silverstein established himself as a composer in Chicago where he was born. He wrote some notable songs you may have heard of, including A Boy Named Sue (which was popularized by Johnny Cash) and One’s on the Way for Loretta Lynn. Silverstein began his career by enlisting in the army in 1950 and served in both Korea and Japan. He became a cartoonist for the Stars & Stripes, learning to draw for the magazine.

 

Image via Encyclopedia Britannica

 

Afterwards, he continued his work as an illustrator and found acclaim when he began drawing for Playboy magazine. He doodled short cartoons for the magazine, his work appearing in every issue from 1957 to the mid 70s, where he found great popularity with the readership. While working for Playboy, he began exploring other areas of his imagination, writing songs, poems, along with self-publishing his own original cartoons. He also recorded his first album during this period, in 1959, which was entitled Hairy Jazz.

 

Image via Wikipedia

 

In 1963, Shel Silverstein was approached by Ursula Nordstrom, who convinced him to try and write material for children. He did so on short notice, producing The Lion Who Shot Back, A Giraffe and a Halfand The Giving Tree in rapid succession. The third title became Silverstein’s most popular work, as its themes were ambiguous in intent and left an open question of what it meant, which made publishers initially balk. Although criticized by some for a bleak or hash worldview, The Giving Tree was nonetheless translated into 30 languages and has been a mainstay of the best children’s books of all time.

 

Image via Wikipedia

 

Shel Silverstein went onto write two more children’s books in the 1970s, Where the Sidewalk Ends and A Light in the AtticHe passed in 1999, right at the turn of the millennium. His legacy will live on for producing some of the most thoughtful children’s books of all time and showcasing that children’s literature can be truly thought provoking while also being fun to read.

Go on and introduce your own kids to his work to celebrate his birthday!

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Scholastic

Seven Sensational Shel Silverstein Sayings

September 25th is Shel Silverstein’s birthday! To celebrate that beloved American poet known for books like The Giving Tree and A Light in the Attic we’ve put together a few of Silverstein’s best quotes.

 

  1. When the light turns green, you go. When the light turns red, you stop. But what do you do when the light turns blue with orange and lavender spots?

  2. Draw a crazy picture,

    Write a nutty poem,

    Sing a mumble-gumble song,

    Whistle through your comb.

    Do a loony-goony dance

    ‘Cross the kitchen floor,

    Put something silly in the world

    That ain’t been there before.

  3. Listen to the mustn’ts, child. Listen to the don’ts. Listen to the shouldn’ts, the impossibles, the won’ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me… Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.

  4. If you are a dreamer come in

    If you are a dreamer a wisher a liar

    A hoper a pray-er a magic-bean-buyer

    If youre a pretender com sit by my fire

    For we have some flax golden tales to spin

    Come in!

    Come in!

  5. How many slams in an old screen door? Depends how loud you shut it. How many slices in a bread? Depends how thin you cut it. How much good inside a day? Depends how good you live ’em. How much love inside a friend? Depends how much you give ’em.

  6. Oh, if you’re a bird, be an early bird

    And catch the worm for your breakfast plate.

    If you’re a bird, be an early early bird–

    But if you’re a worm, sleep late.

  7. Although I cannot see your face

    As you flip these poems awhile,

    Somewhere from some far-off place

    I hear you laughing–and I smile.

     

 

Featured image via Huffington Post

 

Happy Birthday Leo Tolstoy, Author of ‘War And Peace’!

Happy birthday to one of the most acclaimed classic writers of the world: Leo Tolstoy. The Russian writer wrote numerous novels that have become literary mainstays, such as Anna Karenina, The Death of Ivan Ilyichand War And PeaceSurely you’ve heard of at least one of them, although you may not have actually read them.

 

 

Tolstoy was born in Tula Province, Russia in 1828. In the 1860s, he wrote his most famous novel, which we’ve already mentioned: War And Peace. Initially published serially, later collected into a single volume, spanning the period of 1805 to 1820. Since its publication, it has been regarded as Tolstoy’s finest achievement and a huge high mark of literature in general.

 

Image via Amazon

 

Tolstoy continued to write fiction throughout the 1880s and 1890s, until his death in 1910. But War And Peace remains his most famous achievement, understandably so. He spent the better of the 1860s toiling over his epic masterpiece. Portions of it were first published in The Russian Messenger, where it was first titled “The Year of 1805.” More chapters were released, until Tolstoy eventually finished in 1868. Both critics and the public were buzzing about the novel’s historical accounts of the Napoleonic Wars, combined with its thoughtful development of realistic yet fictional characters. The novel also uniquely incorporated three long essays satirizing the laws of history. Among the ideas that Tolstoy extols in War and Peace is the belief that the quality and meaning of one’s life is mainly derived from his day-to-day activities.

 

Image via Wikipedia

 

After War And Peace, Tolstoy followed it with Anna Karenina, where the first line is among his most famous quotes. It said:

 

 

‘All happy families resemble one another, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.’

 

This book was published in installments from 1873 to 1877. The royalties earned from both novels made Tolstoy rich, contributing to his growing status as a beloved author. However, after Anna Karenina, Tolstoy grew depressed and suffered a spiritual crisis. He attempted to find answers in the Russian Orthodox Church but they did not have any answers that satisfied him. He wound up developing his own system of beliefs and expressed them in further books he wrote in the 1880s. However, this cost him to be ousted from the Church and watched by the secret police. This perhaps contributed to his dwindling popularity, with the exception of The Death of Ivan Illyich, which found acclaim and popularity.

Despite this, Tolstoy established himself as a moral and spiritual leader, influencing the likes of Ghandi among others. Also during his later years, Tolstoy reaped the rewards of international acclaim. Yet he still struggled to reconcile his spiritual beliefs with the tensions they created in his home life. His wife not only disagreed with his teachings, she disapproved of his disciples, who regularly visited Tolstoy at the family estate. Their troubled marriage took on an air of notoriety in the press. Anxious to escape his wife’s growing resentment, in October 1910, Tolstoy, his daughter, Aleksandra, and his physician, Dr. Dushan P. Makovitski, embarked on a pilgrimage. Valuing their privacy, they traveled incognito, hoping to dodge the press, to no avail.

He died in November in 1910, where he was buried in the family estate following his passing. He was survived by his wife and his 8 children he had with it. Today, Tolstoy is remembered as a masterpiece of a writer, with a gift for describing a character’s motives and remembering to focus on their everyday actions to describe their overall purpose.

Happy birthday, Tolstoy! Maybe crack open one of his novels and check him out today.

 

 

Featured Image Via The Guardian

Top Ten H.P. Lovecraft Monsters (Who Aren’t Cthulhu)

 

In celebration of Lovecraft’s birthday (August 20th), we’re posting some Lovecraft related horror goodness!

 

H P Lovecraft

Image Via Mr. Sam Shearon-Big Cartel

 

Often with Lovecraft, a lot of his work tends to boil down to his most infamous creation: Cthulhu. Yes, Cthulhu is quite memorable, being an octopus-headed alien sea monster with giant wings, but there’s tons of other Lovecraft stories out there beyond Call of Cthulhueach with their own weird, terrible, and petrifying monsters.

So, let’s celebrate Lovecraft’s work through going over some of his other creations and let old Cthulhu have a rest! Brace your mind, here are the varied creations of the Lovecraft Mythos!

 

 

Image via The H.P. Lovecraft wiki

10. Kassogtha 

This writhing mass of tentacles is said to be Cthulhu’s sister and mate (yuck). She’s describe as literally just a big pile of tentacles and in turn gave birth to Nctosa and Ncothlu, Cthulhu’s daughters. Incest seems a minor horror in the Lovecraft universe but its pretty gross nonetheless and shows that Great Old Ones’ family trees are messed up. As for Kassogtha herself, her abilities are ill defined but she can grab her victims with her tendrils and yank them in to devour them whole. She’s also noted for particularly bad tempered and violent, causing other Old Ones to tread carefully around her.

 

 

Image via Pininterest

9. Ghast

Hailing from Lovecraft’s surreal Dream Cycle, ghasts are humanoid creatures that live in the vaults of Zin. They have a vaguely human face, but lack noses or ears. They also have kangaroo-like legs which they use to hop around on and are very swift, strong, and agile. They hate sunlight and thus dwell in complete darkness, with sunlight capable of destroying them. Hunting in packs, they are fearsome hunters who will practice cannibalism if they get too hungry.

 

 

Image via H.P. Lovecraft wiki

8. Mi-go

Aliens that looks like a cross between fungus and lobsters, mi-gos sure are strange. They fly through vacuum of space, zooming between Earth and Pluto with the aid of their supernatural wings. They worship other Lovecraft gods, acting as servants to them, being classified as a hostile and rather vicious alien species. In ancient times, they waged a war against the Elder Things on Earth before humans came into existence.

 

 

Image via Wikipedia

7. Shoggoth

The Shoggoths were created by the Elder Things as a slave race, taking the form of grotesque blobs covered in dozens of eyes. They have tremendous strength and are nearly invincible against forms of physical attack. Eventually, they developed a consciousness of their own and rebelled against the Elder Things, resulting in them roaming the dark spaces of the world in the modern day. Pray you don’t need one.

 

 

 

 

Image via The H.P. Lovecraft wiki

6. Dagon

A deity who rules over the Deep Ones, Father Dagon, as he’s called by his worshippers, is gigantic sea creature that dwells in the seas. Worshipped by a devout cult of humans and Deep Ones, Dagon only appears physically in a short story named after him, where he erupts from the ocean to embrace an unholy monolith but his presence casts a long shadow over the series, with his children being extensively featured.

 

 

Image via Lovecraft wiki

5. Azathoth

“The Blind Idiot God’, Azathoth is basically a sentient singularity, sitting at the very center of the universe. Azathoth lies constantly in a deep slumber, kept there by other powerful deities who constantly sing to the creature to keep him in his induced, eternal hibernation. For if Azathoth were to ever awaken, the entire universe would end just like that. All it would need is a moment where it opens its eyes and boom! Everything just gone.

 

 

Image via Lovecraft wiki

4. Night-gaunts

Nightgaunts serve many gods and sometimes capture people climbing the mountains in the Dreamlands. They were inspired by nightmares Lovecraft had in his youth. Slithering through the Dreamlands, they collectively gave birth to the human conception of demons, with their long tails, closed feet, horns, and great bat-like wings. They’re said to have been inspired by nightmares Lovecraft himself suffered from.

 

 

Image via Lovecraft wiki

3. Y’Golonac 

Y’golonac is a god of pure evil and sadism, who gets his kicks from torturing humans. He gets off on dozens of perversions that can barely be conceived by human imagination and perception, his acts stretching the limits of human comprehension. He takes a physical form through possessing human hosts, manifesting as a obese man without a head or neck, with a mouth in the palm of his hands. He seeks humans with similar perverse tastes to become his servants, coming to them when they read forbidden literature. His true form is sealed behind a wall of bricks, deep in ancient ruins beneath the earth.

 

 

Image via lovecraft wiki

2. Yog-Sothoth

Yog-Sothoth is another incomprehensible being. It defies visualization. Although it does appear to humans usually as a mass of glowing orbs or other strange tendrils reaching out from the abyss. There is an agreement between many writers and fans that Yog-Sothoth is an omniscient being outside of the material realm, meaning that it is ultimately a god that knows all.

 

 

 

 

Image via Lovecraft wiki

1. Nyarlathotep 

Nyarlathotep is also known as the crawling chaos. It is an evil god that can shape-shift into over a thousand different forms. The character was first found in Lovecraft’s poem titled Nyarlathotep. It was published in 1920 and is part of the original Lovecraftian canon. This being also appeared in a few other stories published throughout the years. This beast is so scary that like the sight of a basilisk, one glance is enough to drive a man insane. When it assumes the form of a human, it turns into an Egyptian Pharaoh. Under the auspices of humanity, this sinister man reels in followers with his slick tongue and turn of a phrase.

 

 

Featured Image Via Reddit/Cthulhu by Andrée Wallin