Got 113 Hours to Spare? Check out the World’s Longest Audiobooks!

Got 113 Hours to Spare? Check out the World’s Longest Audiobooks!

Book Culture

All audiobooks feel long when you’re unable to concentrate on them—so imagine how much trouble you’d have with these behemoths. To understand just how long a really long audiobook actually is, let’s compare that length to some more familiar reads. Fyodor Dostoyevsky‘s classic The Brothers Karamazov is famous as both a literary classic and a book you lied about reading, probably from fear of the decade it would take you to finish. It’s also famous for its staggering length: 824 pages and thirty-four hours. (Congratulations to yourselves for your patience, Dostoyevsky fans. And congratulations to those of you who listened to the audiobook.)   Image Via Lisanotes.com If …

Got 113 Hours to Spare? Check out the World's Longest Audiobooks!

Got 113 Hours to Spare? Check out the World's Longest Audiobooks!

Book Culture

All audiobooks feel long when you’re unable to concentrate on them—so imagine how much trouble you’d have with these behemoths. To understand just how long a really long audiobook actually is, let’s compare that length to some more familiar reads. Fyodor Dostoyevsky‘s classic The Brothers Karamazov is famous as both a literary classic and a book you lied about reading, probably from fear of the decade it would take you to finish. It’s also famous for its staggering length: 824 pages and thirty-four hours. (Congratulations to yourselves for your patience, Dostoyevsky fans. And congratulations to those of you who listened to the audiobook.)   Image Via Lisanotes.com If …

Nick Offerman Narrates Mark Twain Audiobook in Greatest Human Decision Ever

Nick Offerman Narrates Mark Twain Audiobook in Greatest Human Decision Ever

Book Culture

In probably the smartest move in literary history, Audible has recruited Nick Offerman to narrate Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.   via GIPHY   The time-traveling romp follows a 19th-century engineer from Connecticut transported back to 6th-century England, where he uses his then-modern expertise to wow King Arthur and his posse. Things go awry in a hilarious fashion, and Twain proves yet again he’s a master of understated, cantankerous wit.   Enter Nick Offerman, whose Parks and Recreation persona may be the closest we’ll get to seeing Mark Twain in a sitcom. Having previously narrated The …