Tag: atwood

11 Empowering Quotes by Female Writers

There’s no doubt that the representation of women in literature is changing, and we owe most of that to female writers who have created female characters that us readers can use as role models. From Jane Austen to J.K. Rowling, these female authors know just what it’s like to be a woman in a man’s world, and they won’t let the female struggle go unnoticed in books. Here are eleven powerful quotes by female writers to repeat to yourself throughout the day whenever you need a reminder of just what it means to be a woman.

 

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image via biography.com

1. “I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”

– Jane Austen, Persuasion

 

 

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image via poetry foundation

2. “I write for those women who do not speak, for those who do not have a voice because they were so terrified, because we are taught to respect fear more than ourselves. We’ve been taught that silence would save us, but it won’t.”

– Audre Lorde

 

 

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image via literary hub

3. “Just like any woman… we weave our stories out of our bodies. Some of us through our children, or our art; some do it just by living. It’s all the same.”

– Francesca Lia Block, Necklace of Kisses

 

 

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image via thought co

4. “I love to see a young girl go out and grab the world by the lapels. Life’s a bitch. You’ve got to go out and kick ass.”

– Maya Angelou

 

 

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image via the telegraph

5. “We do not need magic to change the world, we carry all the power we need inside ourselves already. we have the power to imagine better.”

– J.K. Rowling

 

 

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image via the guardian

6. “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.”

– Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

 

 

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image via mental floss

7. “Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.”

– Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

 

 

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image via culture trip

8. “No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anybody but oneself.”

– Virginia Woolf, A Room Of One’s Own

 

 

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image via los angeles times – quote via quote fancy

9. “Does ‘feminist’ mean a large unpleasant person who’ll shout at you or someone who believes women are human beings? To me, it’s the latter, so i sign up.”

– Margaret Atwood

 

 

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image via south china morning post – quote via alive media

 

10. “Every girl, no matter where she lives, deserves the opportunity to develop the promise inside of her.”

– Michelle Obama

 

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image via hollywood reporter

11. “Extremists have shown what frightens them most: a girl with a book.”

– Malala Yousafzai

 

Feature image via Pinterest and History.com

Atwood and Rushdie Make Highly Anticipated Booker Prize Shortlist

Previous winners of the prestigious Booker Prize, Margaret Atwood and Salman Rushdie, join four other exciting authors on the Booker Prize shortlist this year.

 

Images via Amazon

Atwood won the prize in 2000 for The Blind Assassin, and she’s back in contention for her much-anticipated sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale. Her latest book, The Testaments, is set to release next week, and it’s already turning quite a few heads. Peter Florence, chair of this year’s judges and one of the few people to have read The Testaments, described the book as “a savage and beautiful novel that speaks to us today with conviction and power.” Speaking about the list more generally, Florence said, like all great literature, these books teem with life, with a profound and celebratory humanity.”

 

 

Another of those books teeming with life is Salman Rushdie’s Quichotte! Rushdie won the Booker Prize with Midnight Children in 1981, which was also deemed “Booker of Bookers” in 1993 and “Best of the Booker” in 2008. Rushdie’s latest work takes inspiration from Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote, telling the story of an aging traveling salesman’s journey across America.

Florence has also sung the praises of Quichottesaying it “pushes the boundaries of fiction and satire.”

 

 

Image via BBC

Joining Atwood and Rushdie on the short list is Lucy Ellman’s Ducks, Newburyport. Ellman is the only U.S. author on this year’s list, and her mammoth 998-page novel is a stream-of-consciousness monologue largely consisting of one continuous sentence. If it wins, Ellman’s novel will be the longest novel to ever win the Booker Prize.

 

 

image via BBc

Bernardine Evaristo’s Girl, Woman, Other also made this prestigious list. The Anglo-Nigerian author’s eighth novel follows the lives of 12 characters, most of whom are black, British women. Evaristo said her writing aims to “explore the hidden narratives of the African diaspora” and “subvert expectations and assumptions”.

 

 

Image via bbc

Chigozie Obioma, born in Nigeria in 1986, is the youngest author on the shortlist this year. Now based in the U.S., both of Obioma’s novels have been shortlisted for the Booker Prize. An Orchestra of Minorities tells the story of a young Nigerian chicken farmer whose love for a woman drives him to become an African migrant in Europe. Afua Hirsch, one of the competition’s judges, describe the tale as “a book that wrenches the heart.”

 

 

Image via BBc

Elif Shafak’s 17th book, 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World, consists of the recollections of a sex worker who has been left for dead in a rubbish bin. Liz Calder, another of the competition’s judges, called the book “a work of fearless imagination.” Shafak writes in both English and Turkish, and she’s the most widely read female author in Turkey.

 

 

What do you think of this stunning line-up? Have you read any of these masterful books? Let us know on Facebook and Instagram!

 

Featured image via The Daily Star