Tag: Art

3 Artists Bringing Books to Life with Their Book Sculptures

While most people look at an old hardcover book and see a story waiting to be read, some artists see a blank canvas.

 

1 – Emma taylor

U.K.-based artist Emma Taylor brings scenes from classic stories to life by creating amazing sculptures from titles she finds at used book shops.

 

Emma Taylor

Image via MyModerNet.Com

 

In an interview with My Modern Met, Taylor described book sculpture as “[her] creative outlet to highlight an appreciation of the little things in life.”

 

Emma Taylor-2

Image Via MYMOdernNet.com

 

Check out her ever-growing portfolio of other bookish sculptures!

 

2 – Tomoko Takeda

Across the globe, Japanese artist Tomoko Takeda transforms popular titles into ornate works of art by carving away layers of paper.

 

Tomoko Takeda-1

Le Petit Prince, Image via mymodernmet.com

 

Describing her 2014 exhibition titled ものがたりの断片 (monogatari no danpen, meaning “story fragments”), Takeda said, “I made books not to read, but to enjoy looking at.”

 

Tomoko Takeda

Flowers for Algernon, Image Via MYModernMet.com

 

 

3 – Thomas Wightman

Thomas Wightman, another British artist, takes book sculpture to the next level with his sculpture of Scotland’s Glenfinnan Viaduct bridge that actually moves!

 

Thomas Wightman-moving sculpture
Image Via Mymodernmet.com

 

The Glenfinnan Viaduct has been a Scottish landmark for more than 100 years, but it was made even more famous when it appeared in the Harry Potter movie series. That little train could very well be the Hogwarts Express taking Harry, Hermione, and Ron to another year at the finest school for witchcraft and wizardry.

 

Thomas Wightman-2

Image via Mymodernmet.com

 

These nifty book sculptures are a great way to beautify and bring new life to old favorites. Would you ever try to do this to one of your books?

 

 

 

Featured Image Via MyModernMet.com

Six Galaxy Brain Tweets from SparkNotes

If you’re anything like me, SparkNotes has always been there when you need it. Now, they’re not only helping you pass your classes, but also serving you the spiciest of literature memes. They’re all pure gold, but here are just a few.

 

 

Theseus or not, YOU. ARE. VALID.

 

 

Unfortunately there’s no third option, so if you want to set the Minotaur up on a blind date with your friend, you’re kind of out of luck. Otherwise, you’re good though. What color do your sails need to be if you didn’t slay the Minotaur but you’re seeing it this Friday?

 

 

 

Some people appreciate attitude

 

 

I mean, he’s already in love with her by that point, but you get the idea. He’s always talking about how mean she is, and then boom, marry me! Of course, the same could be said of her. What a stressful ship. Still though, you know, I’m on it.

 

 

 

Want to delay your problems forever?

 

 

Curiosity may not have killed the cat, but it sure killed Dorian Gray. Still, he lived a while looking fresh and evil in stead of old and evil, so if you’ve got the attic space, why not? In this economy though? The thing’s going under the bed.

 

 

 

Do You haunt an old building? Then you need…

 

 

 

Sure, you might not be the most conventionally attractive, but your secret underground hideaway is second to none, and isn’t it what’s on the inside that matters? What’s under the surface? (What’s directly  under the opera house?)

 

 

 

People can’t know we sit! And… murder!

 

 

Maybe not as relatable as the original video, but definitely a strong mood, and just as futile. The body stays right under the floorboards after all. If only there’d been seashells on the doorknobs, maybe things would have gone better.

 

 

 

Hindsight is… Ah man I botched it.

 

 

Don’t look back in anger (or at all). Going to the depths of hell is a nice gesture, and who doesn’t like musicians, but you’ve gotta stick the landing by actually fulfilling the deal. Just one opinion, but if both of you don’t come back alive, that’s a bad date.

 

 

 

All images via SparkNotes

Building Turned Into Jaw-Dropping Bookcase Illusion

Stand by for a warm and fuzzy feeling.

It has often been said, by those who enjoy a good book, that we live inside of our soft and hardcover friends. Such a notion has never held more validity than it does for the lucky residents of an anonymous building in Utrecht, Netherlands. The aesthetically pleasing surprise comes courtesy of illustrious street artist Jan Is De Man and tattoo artist Deef Freed‘s handy-work.

 

Trompe L'oeil Art by Jan Is De Man
Image Via Mymodernmet.com

 

The owners of this building, who love a good read, asked their delineating friend, Jan Is De Man to deface—or rather reface their previously boring structure. De Man took it upon himself to ask local residents to suggest book titles he could include in his creation; his goal was to create something that reflected a culturally-diverse community in unison (without offending of course: no trigger-happy literature). The result is a mural displaying a wide variety of books which includes literature spanning eight different languages. Unfortunately, I will not provide a list of those books in this article—feel free to pinch and zoom at your leisure.

 

Literature Themed Mural in Utrecht
Image Via Mymodernmet.com

 

“We’ve noticed that this project brought people together without pushing it,” said De Man, “they met each other through books. Regardless of the differences in cultures, regardless of the differences in political point of views. Regardless of being extreme right or extreme left. Books are magical. They tickle your brain. And everyone can read the same book, but feel something different.”

De Man’s friend, who also lives in the building, had wanted the artist to paint a mural on his home for some time; however, De Man’s original plan was not of the literary variety. Being a huge fan of Forest Gump (I can only assume), De Man wanted to paint a huge smiley face on the building. Typically, when people see a smile, their moods are naturally lifted. After studying the shape of the building, it dawned on De Man that smiles are provoked by all sorts of things—therein lies the idea of a bookcase. A structure that’s functionality most closely resembles that of a community, a family, a hug, a home.

 

Featured Image Via Mymodernmet.com

Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle

We Have a New Letter From Hopeful, Unpublished Arthur Conan Doyle

“Dear Sir. I venture to submit to your notice the accompanying tale ‘The actor’s duel’. I once before trespassed upon your valuable time by sending up a sketch which did not come up to your standard – I trust that this may meet with a better fate. However defective the working out maybe I am conscious that the denouement is both original and powerful, worthy, I hope, of the traditions of your magazine.”

The above excerpt is taken from a letter written by Sherlock Holmes creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The British writer would have turned 160 years old this past week (May 22). On Wednesday, The National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh shared a picture of the letter on their Twitter account while appropriately hashtagging #SherlockHolmesday. Doyles’ words are indicative of a crucial period in the life of all creatives—a time when one is starving for success.

 

 

137 years ago, before knighthood, Arthur Conan Doyle found himself at the ripe age of twenty-two, (tactfully) pleading for publication. Like all young writers, Doyle was equipped only with a vague understanding of what he wanted to say to the world—it was just a matter of finding the right words. Regardless, his letter conveys obvious confidence in his ability to wow.

 

Image Via Pinterest.com

 

The “original” and “powerful” denouement Doyle refers to is the climax of his short story—after having stopped the abduction of his sister, a young actor (who had just won the role of Laertes in Shakespeare’s Hamlet) finds out that one of the kidnappers is a colleague of his, a fellow actor playing Hamlet in the same play. In their next performance, the two use real swords in a duel, which grants the production a realness that the audience uproariously applauds. The crowd is unaware the two are actually fighting to the death. The duel plays out in a very art-imitating-life/Aronofsky-Black-Swan-esque way that makes the reader question the integrity of artistic perception.

According to an article on edinburghlive‘s website, Doyle asked Blackwood’s Magazine to consider his short story, then entitled “The Actor’s Duel.” At the beginning of the letter, Doyle reveals the publication had previously rejected another one of his short stories, “The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe.” Despite his best efforts, Blackwood’s turned Doyle down again (idiots); however, “The Actor’s Duel” was eventually published two years later as “The Tragedians” in Bow Bells Magazine.

In 1887, A Study in Scarlett was published—the first of many stories concerning the adventures of detective Holmes and Dr. Watson. In addition to tales surrounding the famous detective, Doyle also wrote many science fiction and historical and novels, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, yadda, and yadda. The writer was prolific and will go down in history as the man who made Benedict Cumberbatch what he is today… whatever that is, exactly.

 

Image Via Writeraccess.com 

 

Laura Ingalls Wilder didn’t start writing until she was forty-three, and she wasn’t published until sixty-five—two  full decades later. Harry Bernstein didn’t get published until he was ninety-six. Susan Boyle didn’t “dream the dream” until she was forty-seven, and Colonel Harland Sanders didn’t franchise his fried chicken business until well past forty. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s successes may not have come as late in life as those of the other icons mentioned, but this letter is an important reminder: (Yoda voice) the greatest teacher, failure is.

 

Image Via Snopes.com

 

 

Featured Image Via Sherlock-Sherlockian.com

 

Hip-Hop Adaptation of Romeo and Juliet to Be Produced by Queen Latifah and Will Smith

Imagine a crowded arena filled with fans of hip-hop music. They await the arrival of some illustrious artist such as the Fresh Prince, DJ Jazzy Jeff, or Queen Latifah; but then, a scrawny emo kid takes the stage—it’s Romeo of house Montague. The beat drops…

In Northeastern Italy born and raised

Pining over love interests is how I spend most of my days

Stressin’ out cryin’ (eventually) dyin’ all cool

Reading some poetry outside of the school

When a couple of families that were up to no good

Started making trouble in my neighborhood

I stirred up one little feud and my mom got scared

She said ‘You’re gonna end up dying with that Capulet girl by the end of this play’

 

Image Via Rebloggy.com

 

No? Yeah, that was bad. What won’t be is the recently announced a hip hop musical adaptation of the William Shakespeare tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. Not taking place in West Philadelphia or  Northeastern Italy in the 14th century, this new take will feature a different and more contemporary setting. It is being described as “a contemporary, musical take on Romeo and Juliet set against the urban rhythms of New York. The love story follows a young waitress from the streets of Brooklyn and an aspiring musician from a wealthy family whose unconventional romance forces them to confront their life choices.”

 

This news comes via Variety which also reports that the project will be directed and written by Solvan “Slick” Naim—a much better rapper than I will ever be. The Algerian-American writer, director, and rapper hails from Bushwick, Brooklyn; Naim already has a comedy series on Netflix entitled “It’s Bruno” which premiered today. He will pen the script for the untitled R&J project with Dave Broome for everyone’s favorite streaming powerhouse.

 

Image Via Hollywoodreporter.com

 

Producing the film will be the Fresh Prince himself, William Smith along with Queen Latifah, Shakim Compere (Flavor Unit Entertainment), James Lassiter, and Caleeb Pinkett (Overbrook Entertainment).

 

Featured Image Via Billboard.com