Tag: Art

Are You a Writer Who Just Got Rejected? Here’s What to Do

If you’re a writer, then you probably have at least two voices in your head, one in each ear. One voice tells you that what you’re writing is the best thing ever, the next Harry Potter/Game of Thrones/Hunger Games. The other voice tells you that you’re a terrible writer and you should just give up.

You suck down those fears and put a smile on your face. You’re a writer, and you have a short story of a novel or maybe you even have both. You submit your work and sit back.

 

 

 

“No, thanks.”

It’s a stab in the gut, and the ‘thanks’ only adds salt to the wound. You suck it up and submit again. Maybe this time you’ll submit to a smaller agency, a tinier magazine. You hit send:

“No, thanks.”

Now what?

 

The Gotham Writers Conference

Image Via Twitter

 

Thanks to The Gotham Writers Conference, we at Bookstr were able to listen in on a lecture given by Kim Laio, author of the essay published on Lit Hub Why You Should Aim for 100 Rejections a Year. Since everyone had a paper and pen, she had the listeners in the audience go through two different exercises. The first exercise was as follows:

 

  • Writer down your hopes and dreams as a writer

 

After telling everyone to do this, the room was filled with a long contemplative silence filled only with the soft scribbling of pens and the soft groaning rattles of the radiator. When everyone’s pens were done, and after some time after that, Kim Liao said this:

Now skip a line. Protect your hopes and dreams.

After giving us a clear warning that her next two directions were “worse” then she first direction, she gave us the second:

  • Answer what’s stopping you from achieving those dreams

And then the third:

  • What’s underling these anxieties?

 

Kim Liao

Image Via Twitter

 

She then turned to the audience, asking them what they answered. Don’t fret, the only people who answered were those who raised their hands and were given the microphone. One person told us a story about how they were writing a book about a “terrible cult” and the effects their actions brought upon their family.

A book about cults? Count me in!

She then said she hadn’t told anyone about the book for the longest time because, well, there was a certain personal conflict with the book.

What was the person problem? Her brother.

Her brother was a member of the cult. He left the cult, but became an apologist for the cult.

It was only after this person was able to tell her brother about the book and give him it that she was able to move on. She doesn’t know if he read the book, if he was angry or upset, but he had the book and it was out of her hands.

 

 

This story is about the third direction Kim Liao gave us: What’s underling these anxieties?  Turns out the most common reason for anxieties about your hopes and dreams about becoming a writer is this daunting question, “What will happen if you tell the truth?”

See, if you’re a writer, then you probably have at least two voices in your head, one in each ear. One voice tells you that what you’re writing is the best thing ever, the next Harry Potter/Game of Thrones/Hunger Games. The other voice tells you that you’re a terrible writer and you should kill yourself.

Both of these voices are toxic.

 

Fiction is the truth inside the lie

Image Via QuoteHD.com

 

Fiction, non-fiction, they all deal with truths. Even if the book takes place on another planet or another dimension, there is always a person connection the writer has with the work. It came from them, and now it’s out there on a bone writer paper written in black ink. It’s literally out there in black and white, and most often we are afraid to show it because of fear.

That right there is a personal rejection. No one has rejected the story except you. If you’re thinking about your worst review, as one person at the conference was, stop that. Any craft, be it writing or construction or electric or running, gets better as you do it more and more. So keep it, and silence the voice that tells you you’re a terrible writer and know that the story you are telling is one that only you could tell.

 

Sit Back

Image Via PlayMelnc

 

Now sit back. Remember that voice that tell you you’re writing is the best thing ever, the next Harry Potter/Game of Thrones/Hunger Games? Bring down your expectations. Humble yourself.

 

Image result for humble yourself advice
Image Via PInterest

 

Even the authors of those books didn’t know they were writing something as huge as those. Heck, I’d bet George R R Martin has days where he’d wish Game of Thrones wasn’t as big as it was so the pressure would be off as he finished up Winds of Winter.

Tamper your arrogance, erase your fears

Now you’re ready to submit. Then you get a rejection. And then another one. And then another one after that.

So what do you do?

Well, what do you think that Kim Laio, author of the essay published on Lit Hub Why You Should Aim for 100 Rejections a Year is going to tell you?

 

Kim Liao

Image Via Girl Meets Fornosa

 

Get 100 rejections of year

This is how you do that:

  • Set up an excel spreadsheet
  • Set up one column for the number
  • Set up one column for the story
  • Set up one column for the publishing house/agent

 

Don’t worry, we understand. One-hundred rejections a year? A hundred times of people stabbing you in the gut with that “No, thanks,” as though the ‘thanks’ at the end of that sentence means anything? No, thanks, you go, but don’t reject me now!

According to Kim Liao, she heard this advice from a friend and thought it was the “best advice ever.” By collecting a hundred rejections a year, you’re making it yourself mission. Your goal now isn’t to get published, but to wrap up the rejection list. When you get a rejection now, you can now log it into the spreadsheet and get that rush of a dopamine because you’re productive. That rush, that split second happiness, makes you feel motivated to go and put yourself out there again.

It isn’t about collecting those rejections slips so you know who to stick it to when you make a ton of money, that’s not why Stephen King collected his rejection slips, it’s to give yourself a goal, to turn your disappoint into a mission to keep going and wrap up the rejection list. You’re accepting that you’re going to get rejected and now you’re striving to do so. Odds are at least one person will accept your story. Plus, if you want to be a writer, you have to get used to it.

 “For a writer, it’s mostly rejections.”

 

Image Via Writer’s Digest

 

Rejections aren’t all bad. Remember: “The door isn’t closing, the path if shifting.”

Rejections can create relationships. Your expert query letter may prove that while the agent isn’t interested in your current work, he/she might be interested in your work as a writer. They might ask to see something else or, worst case, they now know your name. Your name is out there, like a plane traveling across the beach, and you never know who might see your banner.

At this point in the conference, Kim Liao gave us the audience a second set of direction. With pens and notebooks at the ready, the silence was palpable. These are the sets in full:

  • List 5 or more things you can do in the next year
  • List 4 things you can do in the next 6 months
  • List 3 things you can do in the next 2 months
  • List 2 things you can do this month
  • List 1 things you can do this week

So what’re you waiting for?

 

Twitter

Image Via Author Media

 

Go on Twitter and search for submission calls. Look for agents and editors, most agents and editors post their emails on their Twitter.

 

Image Via Webnode

 

Maybe you should set up a blog; just remember to “write lots of posts in advance.”

 

Image Via Self-Publishing School

 

Set up a writing schedule. A writing schedule isn’t necessary just writing. Put time aside for pitching, writing, and querying. All three of these things have to do with writing, and you have to set time aside for each.

 

 

Before you query, take a step back and look at your writing. “Whenever you feel that you’re ready, take a week,” and remember that “[y]our writer’s group can help you solve your problems…not your agent.”

 

You can only query one agent with one project at a time. If you go back and make changes, odd are that agent doesn’t want to hear about that project anymore.

 

When you’re ready to submit your work, set up the excel spreadsheet and aim to get a hundred rejections a year. Rejection is a “necessary step,” in the writing process. “It can happen anywhere,” even to the most successful writer.

But keep writing and keep submitting. If you get a rejection, and then another one, and then another one after that, then guess what? You have only three rejections and need ninety-seven more to finish out your list! Odds are you’re going to be surprised because the best thing you write might be the thing people like the best.

And don’t forget: if you’re writing a novel and you go “Now I have an agent! I’m done,” then you’re wrong. You haven’t even gotten started yet, but you’re ready.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via

Joni Mitchell Publishes Private Poetry from the 70s

Joni Mitchell, the esteemed singer-songwriter of the 70s, is publishing a collection of handwritten lyrics and artwork titled Morning Glory on the Vine: Early Songs and Drawings. Though Mitchell is most well known for her music, this mysterious work has been a part of her unique character for decades.

 

Image via Amazon

 

Morning Glory on the Vine was originally created in 1971. Mitchell created 100 copies, including a personal signature with each one, before distributing the work to her closest friends. This will be the first time that the extremely intimate work will be available for public consumption.

 

 

Mitchell choose to publish Morning Glory on the Vine with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in celebration of her 75th birthday. In addition to Mitchell’s poetry and artwork included in the original version, the published version will also feature a new introduction written by Mitchell.

 

Joni Mitchell’s Art/Image via Canadian Art Junkie

 

Many of Mitchell’s pals are also included within the work, as the artist painted several portraits modeled after her famous friends. For example, Neil Young, Georgia O’Keefe, and David Crosby, all have portraits handmade by Mitchell herself.

Morning Glory on the Vine is available to purchase online and in bookstores now.

 

 

 

 

Featured Image via Pitchfork 

5 Books You Can’t Just Can’t Listen To

You read the title, you know what this article is about. With all the hoopla over the last hundred or so years of us asking the same few questions (Will the book die out? Is the book dead?) over and over again, I’ve decided to do something a little more productive than just roll my eyes.

I’ve decided to give you five great books that you just can’t listen to. Yes, you may be able to find some actor with the soothing chirp of Michael Caine or the deep drawl of Morgan Freeman, but simply listening isn’t going to give you the full experience. For these books, you have to read them yourself.

I think you get the idea.

Now for this list I’ve discounted Mad Libs, coloring books, pop up books, or any comic book/graphic novels/manga. None of those will be appearing on this list. You’re old enough to know that you can’t just hear the soothing voice of a Stephen Fry while you’re running on the treadmill to get the full picture—you actually have to open up the comic book and read it. There’s no use of me reiterating that for the hundredth time.

What’ll be on this list are books. Books with spines and pages and words. Ready?

 

 

5. Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar

 

Hopscotch: A Novel (Pantheon Modern Writers Series) by [Cortazar, Julio]
Image Via Amazon

Written in Paris, Hopscotch was published in Spanish in 1963 and in English in 1966. Okay, so we’ve got Horacio Oliveira, an Argentinian writer who lives in Paris with his mistress, La Maga. Everything is going well until a child dies and La Maga disappears off the face of the planet. Not sure what to do, Oliveira returns to Buenos Aires, where he works by turns as a salesman, a keeper of a circus cat which can truly count, and an attendant in an insane asylum.

Easy, right?

 

Rayuela

The Spanish Version / Image Via Wikipedia

 

Oh yeah, ninety-nine chapters are expendable. You read that right, expendable. Meaning they are useless, that they can be cut out of the book with no loss to the story, and with a book that’s 155 chapters in total, that means that about 63.87% of the book can be thrown out in the trash.

Why didn’t the editor do his/her job? I hear you ask, and the answer is why this book made this list.

See there are a couple of ways to read this book. You can read it from chapter one to chapter fifty six, or you can “hopscotch” throughout the book using the “Table of Instructions”. Or you can go completely random.

 

Julio Cortazar

Image Via AZ Quotes

 

Reading the book in order means that ninety-nine expendable chapters will make little to no sense. They’re nothing more than random musings.

Reading them using the “Table of Instructions” means that some of these expendable chapters can be revelations. See, the entire book is written in an episodic, snapshot manner. A real slice of lie type story. These expendable chapters, when you put them in order, can add information about the characters, such as giving more information about this guy named Morelli who pops up for a small cameo in the novel. At first, he’s random. Diving deep, we realize what he means.

Point is, these “expendable” chapters at first seem like random musings, but upon closer inspection some of these ‘musings’ are actually answers in disguise.

 

Image result for Julio Cortazar
Image Via La tinta

Wait! I hear you say, can’t we just have two audio versions: One where a narrator goes through the book linearly and one where he “hopscotches” around using the “Table of Instructions”.

Well, assuming money is no obstacle, yes, but you forget about the third way to read this book: figure it out yourself.

Remember how I said reading the table means that only *some* of the expendable chapters make sense? That’s where making it up as you go along comes. Yes, that part where I said “you can go completely random” wasn’t a joke. In fact, Cortázar himself gives the reader the option of choosing a unique path through the narrative.

The book is a puzzle. It’s a choose your own adventure where you are left on your own devise to figure out the timeline between all these chapters. It won’t be easy, given that the narratives techniques switch from first person and third person to stream-of-consciousness and traditional spelling and grammatical rules are often bent or even outright broken, but this isn’t your typical book.

It’s a book you can’t just simply listen it.

 

4. Chuck Palahniuk’s Invisible Monsters Remix

 

Invisible Monsters Remix by [Palahniuk, Chuck]
Image Via Amazon

Do you like Chuck Palahniuk? He wrote Fight Club, and I love Fight Club. I can’t stop talking about Fight Club. Did you know that Chuck Palahniuk, author of Fight Club, thinks Fight Club is better than Fight Club?

Chuck Palahniuk also wrote Invisible Monsters, a novel about a fashion model who has everything: a boyfriend, a career, a loyal best friend, but loses it all from when a sudden freeway “accident” leaves her disfigured and unable to speak. She becomes an ‘invisible monster,’ but then Brandy Alexander, Queen Supreme, walks into her life and teaches her that reinventing yourself means erasing your past and making up something better.

It’s a great book, and I wish I could talk about it, but I won’t. Instead I’ll talk about what Palahniuk deems the ‘director’s cut’ called Invisible Monsters Remix.

 

Invisible Monsters Remix

Image Via Amazon

 

This remix chops up the original story, presenting it in short scenes which end with a request to skip to another page. It’s a choose-your-own-adventure novel in which readers must follows the directions and flip through the book a la Hopscotch, but this book takes it one step beyond.

Yes, you can read the book linearly, yes you can flip around and, as per the introduction “jump to Chapter Forty-one,” or you could go completely random, but Palahniuk takes it one step beyond.

For a start, you can take out a pen and mark up the book. I’m serious. See, Palahniuk has added  new chapters interspersed throughout the book and you can get lost flipping through the book. To solve this, the author himself encourages you, dear reader, to mark each page with an ‘x’ so when you get to the end (which is in the middle) you can look back to see if you’ve missed any pages.

You will miss pages. About three three chapters worth, in fact.

Plus, unlike Hopscotch, Palahinuk has this:

 

This is real

Image Via Danielshankcruz.files.wordpress

 

There’s nothing like two sequences where the pages that are printed backwards so you gotta use a mirror to read them. Wouldn’t you agree that the experience be less if you just listened to someone reading the pages normally?

 

3. S by Doug Dorst and J. J. Abrams

 

 

Image Via Amazon

 

The book is called S, but not really. It’s actually called Ship of Theseus, but not really. Let me explain.

Ship of Theseus was written by an elusive author named V. M. Straka and published in 1949.

S was written by Doug Dorst and J.J. Abrams, and they wrote three stories that are packaged into one.

The core story is Ship of Theseus by V. M. Straka, published in 1949, which is about an amnesiac, known only as S., who’s trying to figure out who he really is after waking up in a strange city who becomes trapped in a conflict between a violent, oppressive industrialist and his rebellious workers.

The book has footnotes describing how the author, V. M. Straka, was a secretive anarchist who might have written this book as an allegory of a real conflict and assassination conspiracy of which he was a part. No one knows who Straka is and supposedly he is dead, but the book’s editor, F. X. Caldeira, not only wrote the introduction but also included various footnotes throughout the book that seem to contain coded messages in an attempt to contact Straka.

 

S-Inside The Book

Image Via Pinterest

 

Now the book itself is a mock-up of a high school library’s check-out history of the book, spanning the years 1957 to 2000. A grad student named Eric has been working on his own theory of who Straka was, writing his notes in the margins. Jen, an undergrad student who works at the college library, writes out her responses in the margins, creating a conversation as they trade the book back and forth, blossoming into a romance as soon as they begin to encounter some danger by people who don’t want the truth to be known.

 

S-Everything Inside

Everything The Book Comes With / Image Via Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling

 

One book, three stories.

 

 

2.  The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall

 

The Raw Shark Texts by [Hall, Steven]

Image Via AMazon

 

Do you like pictures? Do you like words? How about pictures made out of words? Well there’s a word for that and it’s calligrams and this book is choc-full of them. Moving text, text that forms pictures, giant texts to emphasize words, this book has it.

Let’s take a step back.

A man named Eric Sanderson wakes up in a house he doesn’t recognize, unable to remember anything of his life. A note instructs him to call a Dr. Randle, who informs him he’s had another episode of memory loss.

Apparently this has been happening for the last two years, but Eric isn’t too sure. He decides to learn the truth, escaping the predatory forces that threaten to consume him.

Postmodern magic rituals, conceptual predators swimming the abstract depths of consciousness, this psychological odyssey is a brilliant story by its own, but Hall takes one step beyond.

The text loops and swerves, putting the reader in Hall’s mindset.

 

The Raw Shark Texts-Swerving Words

Image Via Goodreads

 

It even gives us an image of what Hall sees with images like this:

 

The Raw Shark Texts-Eye

Image Via Than Words

 

Try have someone reading that text out loud! Hall knows that simply saying “an eye appeared” wouldn’t be as powerful as showing us an eye made up of words, making our skin crawl as we feel multiple eyes staring right as us through the very page itself.

But Hall then doesn’t just make the text see, he gives it a face.

 

The Raw Shark Texts-Shark

Image Via Pinterest

 

A picture is worth a thousand words, and these pictures are made of words

 

1. House of Leaves by Mark Z Danielewski

 

Image Via Amazon

 

This book is 709 pages and I read it over the courage of two days. My eyes could not be peeled away. I was lying on the bathroom floor in a hotel at midnight, my cousin’s wedding in eight hours, and I refused to close the book. My brother was asleep in the next room so I couldn’t turn on the light, so I went in the bathroom and lay across the floor and read this book until I was finished.

My cousin’s wedding is a blur, but this book isn’t.

House of Leaves is about a house that is about a little less than an inch bigger on the inside than it is on the outside.

Let’s back up. We start off with a first-person narrative by Johnny Truant, a Los Angeles tattoo parlour employee and professed unreliable narrator. Looking for an apartment, Traunt finds out about the meant of the recently deceased Zampanò, a blind, elderly man.

Curious, Traunt goes to the apartment and finds that the blind man was writing a book. Yes, the blind man was writing a book. The book is an academic study of a documentary film called The Navidson Record, even though, according to Traunt, there’s no evidence that the film or its subjects ever existed, even though Zampanò quotes the likes of famous figures from Stephen King to Stanley Kubrick and Anne Rice.

 

Mark Z Danielewski

Image Via KCRW

 

From here, Traunt’s story is told through increasingly long footnotes sprinkled into The Navidson Record, which is about a documentarian who moves into a house with his family and realizes that their house is bigger on the inside than the outside.

What’s more, the house seems to be expanding while the outside stays the same. Plus, a dark, cold hallway opens in an exterior living room wall that should project outside into their yard, but does not. It’s also impossible to shine a light in this hallway and, furthermore, seems to be shifting and growing.

The book utilizes different fonts to distinguish characters. These are: Times New Roman (Zampanò), Courier (Johnny), Bookman (The Editors), and Dante (Johnny’s mother).

It also uses color changes.

 

A Red Passage from 'House of Leaves'

Image Via Fox Burrow Magazine

 

The word “house” is colored blue (gray for non-color editions of the book and light gray for red editions.

The word Minotaur and all struck passages are colored red.

References to Johnny’s mother are colored purple.

This is just the basic stuff right here.

 

House of Leaves

Image VIa Goodreads

 

A prime example of ergodic literature, the book contains copious footnotes, many of which contain footnotes themselves…

 

Image VIa Ergodic Design

 

…while other pages contain only a few words or lines of text…

 

House of Leaves

Image Via Goodreads

 

…some of the text is arranged to mirror the events in the story or a character’s mind…

 

Image result for House of Leaves danielewski footnotes
Image Via The Reader’s Room

 

There are sections where there were just a few words on the page while a chase was happening so you sped through the pages like you were running through the halls and there are sections where the dialogue from people on top of a staircase was high on the page while speech from the characters down below was on the bottom of the page.

 

House of Leaves

Image Via Cornerfolds

 

Housse of Leaves
Image Via Goodreads

 

Give me audiobook of that! You can’t, because to read this book, to read all these books, you have to do more than skim through the pages, you have to interact with them. You have to rip them apart, mark them up, twist them and turn them.

Call these big five art, call these big five artsy, call these big five pretentious, I call them the reason why “The book is dead” question makes my eyes roll into the back of my head.

 

 

 

Featured Images Via Amazon

Eleven of the Most Beautiful And Awesome Book Covers

They say never judge a book by its cover but that’s not really true. The purpose of a book’s cover is to entice you into buying it and those that do a poor job of representing the book aren’t doing their job well. But book covers are an often overlooked piece that provides an intimate look at the contents before you even open them. Some of them are even artistic masterpieces in their own right. But what are the best? Let’s have a look at some of the best ones and marvel at their beauty.

 

 

11. ‘Jurassic Park’ by Michael Crichton 

image via Amazon

 

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton is utterly brilliant as a cover. It depicts a Tyrannosaurus Rex’s skeleton against a white backdrop, hinting at terrifying possibilities but nonetheless drawing the reader in for a wild ride. Its also gets bonus points for becoming so iconic.

 

10. ‘Get in Trouble’ by Kelly Link

image via amazon

 

Get In Trouble by Kelly Link provides a marvelous and captivating cover. Her stories are offbeat and have a sense of offness to them, showcased by this strange cover. The upside down nature of a seemingly normal house provides an excellent preview of what you’re in for: the normal world turned literally upside down. Not to mention its a really cool visual piece.

 

9. ‘Heart of a samurai’ by Margi Preus 

image via amazon

 

Heart of a Samurai by Margi Preus has an instantly captivating cover. The colors of the wave contrasted with the lovely sky, the boat riding atop the wave, and the whales beneath instantly make for a classic image. There’s a sense of adventure, danger, and even action from the cover alone, as it draws your eye in right away.

 

7. ‘the great gatsby’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald 

image via amazon

 

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald has truly one of the great covers of all time. Created by Spanish artist Francis Cugat, this cover is a pretty work of surrealism and beauty. Every part of it is iconic: from the giant disembodied eyes and lips floating over the colorful, almost theme parking looking location below against the backdrop of the blue night sky, its a wonderful work of art that will always represent its book in the popular consciousness.

 

 

6. ‘Beowolf’ translated by Seamus Heaney 

image via amazon

 

Beowolf by Seamus Heaney is a new translation of the classic epic poem that instantly draws your eye through its simplistic but striking cover. All there is to it is a man standing in full chainmail with his back to the camera but it instantly captures the feeling of the poem. The image captures violence and strangeness through what it implies, becoming more the more you pay attention to it. A truly classic image for a classic poem.

 

5. ‘The Godfather’ by Mario Puzo 

image via amazon

 

The Godfather by Mario Puzo is a classic, stark novel and its cover matches its iconic status. Created by S. Neil Fujita, conveys the rotten power Puzo examines, even as it intrigues the potential reader. It could just as easily be the cover to a horror novel—which isn’t actually that far off the mark, if you think about it. There aren’t too many book covers that create what’s essentially a brand logo, but that’s just what this one did.

 

4. ‘The hate u give’ by Angie Thomas

image via Amazon

 

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas is another brilliant cover that’s more recent. It uses negative space in a bold way, drawing focus to its central character who holds up her sign and demands the looker’s attention. The lead character is both empowered and obscured by her message, an awesome showcase of the book’s themes in a simple way.

 

 

3. ‘Brave New World’ by Aldous Huxley

image via Amazon

 

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley’s cover combines the absurd and frightening tone of the story with a simple, bold approach that draws the eye and holds it tortuously. You try to figure out what you’re looking at, even as the sneaking suspicion that you don’t want to know creeps up on you.

 

2. ‘The Stranger’ by Albert Camus 

image via Amazon

 

The Stranger by Albert Camus is a bit headache inducing to look at but a great image nonetheless. The stark lines converging to create a hidden optical illusion. Once you see it, you’ll never forget it; once you read the book, you’ll forever associate it with this powerful cover.

 

1. ‘A clockwork Orange’ by Anthony Burgess 

Image via Amazon

 

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess is a disturbing cover for a disturbing novel. Supposedly banged out in a single evening, this cover referenced the iconic film, and conveyed the sense of society being broken all at once, showcasing a screaming face contrasted with a fire in place of the upper part of the man’s head. It’s brilliant on a level no other cover has quite been able to surpass.

 

 

 

Featured Images via Amazon

3 Artists Bringing Books to Life with Their Book Sculptures

While most people look at an old hardcover book and see a story waiting to be read, some artists see a blank canvas.

 

1 – Emma taylor

U.K.-based artist Emma Taylor brings scenes from classic stories to life by creating amazing sculptures from titles she finds at used book shops.

 

Emma Taylor

Image via MyModerNet.Com

 

In an interview with My Modern Met, Taylor described book sculpture as “[her] creative outlet to highlight an appreciation of the little things in life.”

 

Emma Taylor-2

Image Via MYMOdernNet.com

 

Check out her ever-growing portfolio of other bookish sculptures!

 

2 – Tomoko Takeda

Across the globe, Japanese artist Tomoko Takeda transforms popular titles into ornate works of art by carving away layers of paper.

 

Tomoko Takeda-1

Le Petit Prince, Image via mymodernmet.com

 

Describing her 2014 exhibition titled ものがたりの断片 (monogatari no danpen, meaning “story fragments”), Takeda said, “I made books not to read, but to enjoy looking at.”

 

Tomoko Takeda

Flowers for Algernon, Image Via MYModernMet.com

 

 

3 – Thomas Wightman

Thomas Wightman, another British artist, takes book sculpture to the next level with his sculpture of Scotland’s Glenfinnan Viaduct bridge that actually moves!

 

Thomas Wightman-moving sculpture
Image Via Mymodernmet.com

 

The Glenfinnan Viaduct has been a Scottish landmark for more than 100 years, but it was made even more famous when it appeared in the Harry Potter movie series. That little train could very well be the Hogwarts Express taking Harry, Hermione, and Ron to another year at the finest school for witchcraft and wizardry.

 

Thomas Wightman-2

Image via Mymodernmet.com

 

These nifty book sculptures are a great way to beautify and bring new life to old favorites. Would you ever try to do this to one of your books?

 

 

 

Featured Image Via MyModernMet.com