Tag: all books

Barnes & Noble Hacked?

If you are Barnes & Noble regular, you need to know this.

Screenshot captured via Camila

It reported that on the 10th of October Barnes & Noble was subjected to a cyber attack. In the address to their customers, B&N reassures that customer’s payment, card information, and financial data were not compromised. But the systems that were impacted during the cyber attack held email addresses, billing, and shipping, telephones number if they were provided.

This a huge blow to the bookselling chain as they are relying heavily on online book sales in the wake of COVID-19, quarantines, and global lockdowns.

They haven’t received word if this information has been leaked or gotten out in any way but it is, unfortunately, a possibility. We will be following the situation for any updates, but keep yourselves well informed and be extra wary of strange emails just in case. Stay safe!

 

via GIPHY

Featured Image via usatoday

Bookspot of the Week: Gertrude and Alice Cafe Bookstore

What’s more perfect then finding a book or books you want to read and starting them before you even leave the store? To sit at a cafe with a book is the ideal environment for us book lovers out there.

For this week’s bookspot we are going all the way down under to Australia. We spoke to Jane Turner of Gertrude and Alice Cafe, located on 46 Hall Street, Bondi Beach NSW 2026 Australia. 

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice

 

How did your bookstore transition from concept to reality?

In 2000, Katerina Cosgrove (co-founder) and I decided we wanted to open a cafe bookstore. It took 12 months of planning. We spent every waking hour when we weren’t working scouting possible shop locations and stockpiling 45,000 second hand books to open with. We trawled local markets, charity shops, auctions and garage sales. We lived with 100’s of boxes of books, beautiful but odd sets of china tea cups and mismatched tables & chairs that were stacked to the ceilings in our homes until we finally found our shop in Hall Street, and we opened in 2001. We are fast approaching our 20 year milestone.

 

What do you feel is unique to your bookstore?

It truly is one of a kind. People say that our shop is like their lounge room at home but without the clothes thrown everywhere!  Most other shops that have added a cafe to their business model run them as a separate entity. Our cafe bookstore is run by us. As we have been around for 20 years, many of our customers have been with us since the very beginning. We have seen babies go through school, finish their schooling and work part time for us while they complete their studies. Ella,  who works for us full time now used to visit in a pram with her Mum Jo who  is one of our biggest readers.

I love the sense of community that we have created. It would have to be the one thing that I’m most proud of. 

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice

 

If you had infinite space, what might you add to the store?

It’s a very long list that keeps getting longer! We actually have a DA (development application) to put in a staircase and extend into the unit above us. We would love to have a bigger space to hold events, book clubs, expand our children’s section and host reading afternoons for little ones. We would love a specialist antiquarian room with big leather reading chairs and my greatest wish is to have a writer-in-residence space under the big window where we could invite people to not only be inspired to write, but be available for a short time each day to chat to other aspiring writers. It could also be an artist in residence space as well. There never seems to be enough money to get it off the ground – but I’m not giving up on my dream just yet. I believe that one day it will happen.

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice

 

How do you feel your bookstore fits into your local community?

We have always called ourselves “a community cafe”. Part of our logo says “for the people” and so we live and breathe this mantra. We would be nothing without the support of our community each and every day  and our entire team is aware of this. We get involved in local projects whenever we can, support  schools and work on fundraisers with other local businesses . I honestly believe that we wouldn’t have been as fortunate as we have been to be in business for 20 years had we not become part of the community. My family grew up here at Bondi so it means everything to us.

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice

 

What does your store offer that a chain or online retailer can’t?

Totally personalised and individualised service. We know your coffee, we know your name, we know what books you like to read. We know when you need a hug or a shoulder to cry on. We know when you need 5 m minutes to sit and recharge in our cosy chairs and get ready to go out and face the world again. We hold newborn babies so you can finish your breakfast. 

We have seen people that had never read a book in their life become voracious readers. As a family-owned business we are service driven and therefore our care factor is huge. We have been on the other end of the line when dealing with a chain or online businesses and believe that what we offer is everything that they don’t. 

Our customer Michelle wrote this to me recently “It means so much to have some place to go where the staff know your name, your order, a book you might like to read, to have a communal table where people come together and make a community out of strangers.  It’s food for the soul. I don’t care if I can save $5 buying it online -what you do here is priceless.” How amazing is that to have someone write something like that about what you created! A community out of strangers…wow!

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice

 

Do you hand-pick your staff to create a specific environment?

We do. You have to be an all-rounder as working in a small team means you become multi-skilled. You have to be able to get in and do what needs to be done. Even though we work in hospitality, we don’t really have a high turnover of staff. We become like family even though it has aspects of a highly dysfunctional family at times! It helps if you read a lot. 

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice

 

What about your store do you think appeals to your neighborhood?

It has a sense of belonging. Of place and of connection. It’s warm and cosy and welcoming. We try our best to ensure that we provide a service that keeps you coming back again and again. 

 

Image via Gertrude and Alice
Featured image via Gertrude and Alice

Bookspot of the Week: Libreria

It’s Bookspot time! Welcome back to bookspot of the week, where we have a chance to speak with amazing bookstores to quite frankly show them off. And if you didn’t know about them, now you do! This week we spoke with Lloyd Sowerbutts, the manager of a bookshop in London called, Libreria, it can be found at 65 Hanbury Street, London, E1 5JP.

 

Image via Libreria

 

How did your bookstore transition from concept to reality?

Libreria was conceived as a way for customers to discover new voices and ideas, which wouldn’t be easy in a conventionally merchandised bookshop, or internet retailer’s algorithm. Libreria’s books are grouped according to broad themes, such as: Wanderlust, Enchantment for the Disenchanted and Utopia.

 

What do you feel is unique to your bookstore?

 I feel that our thematic grouping of titles and the shop’s interior are the most obviously unique qualities.

 

If you had infinite space, what might you add to the store? A ‘speakeasy’ cocktail bar and reading space. 

 

Image via Libreria

 

How do you feel your bookstore fits into your local community?

Pre-lockdown, Libreria would host Language Labs, a programme conceived by a former colleague Gabi Spangenthal, which would offer a space for members of Second Home and other volunteers to offer local migrants a space to practice English that was formally taught by ELATT.

 

What does your store offer that a chain or online retailer can’t?

Libreria is designed to maximise the serendipitous discovery of new books and ideas. 

 

Do you hand-pick your staff to create a specific environment?

 Not particularly. I assume a love of books from all applicants, so I look for skills that would complement the existing team’s strengths and will help the shop grow into a space our customers cherish.

 

Image via Libreria

 

How else do you create a welcoming environment?

 I like to welcome our customers to the shop, as they are the lifeblood of the shop. We are happy to order books that we don’t currently have in stock. Ultimately, nothing should ever be a problem to solve. 

 

What about your store do you think appeals to your neighborhood?

I believe the shop’s beauty makes it a destination for many of our customers. Our social initiatives and event programme offer a different quality to other bookshops.

 

Do you have any staff picks or releases we should watch out for?

We are always talking about books that excite us via our Instagram and newsletter channels. Customers can sign up to our newsletter, via www.libreria.io

 

Image via Libreria

 

Do you tailor your inventory according to your community?

Absolutely! Each month, the team selects the books that we believe will appeal to the many tastes and interests of our customers.

 

What’s your favorite book?

This is a tough one. I have never been able to whittle it to a single book. I’m curious by nature, so my favourite books reflect this. If I was forced to pick a few, they would be: The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert, Lost Japan by Alex Kerr, The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break by Steven Sherrill and The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas. 

 

Image via Libreria
Feature Image via Libreria