Tag: Adaptation

Books to Read Before They Become Movies

If you’re a book lover, then your favorite thing to say is probably “Oh, the book was SO much better than the movie!” and we don’t disagree, because it probably was! So before these awesome tales turn into movies in the new year, make sure you snag a few so you can spit out the same line when the adaptations come out!

 

p.s I still love you by jenny han

image via trending news buzz

This is the ever anticipated sequel to the famous YA book and later Netflix film, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before by author Jenny Han, and it will be available to stream on February 12, just two days before Valentines Day! This story is said to focus on Lara Jean’s new relationship with Peter Kavinsky. But this is a high school romance movie, so it’s required to feature a love triangle, and you bet it does!

 

 

dune by frank herbert

Image Via Dread central

Frank Herbert’s sci-fi masterpiece Dune, is getting its long promised screen adaptation since David Lynch took on the challenging task in the ’80s. Arrival director Denis Villeneuve is the perfect fit to adapt the famous book, and the film stars highly notable actors such as Timothee Chalamet as Paul Atreides, alongside Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Jason Momoa, Javier Bardem, and fan favorite Zendaya.

 

 

the invisible man by h.g wells

image via geeky gadgets

The talented Elisabeth Moss stars in the modern adaptation of this classic H.G. Wells novel. This version, a psychological horror film written and directed by Leigh Whannell, is a loose take on the Wells book, as the story focuses on a woman who, after her ex supposedly dies by suicide, thinks she is being hunted by someone invisible. The movie is out on February 28, and we can’t wait for this thrill ride!

 

 

emma by jane austen

image via austenprose

Regardless of how the late Jane Austen might feel, fan-favorite Emma is hitting the theaters on February 21, so all Austen lovers can rejoice! The book was also adapted in 1996 in the Douglas McGrath directed film starring Gwyneth Patlrow, but it’s been 24 years since its release, so it’s time for a remake, right? The new version, directed by Autumn de Wilde, features Anya Taylor-Joy in the lead role as our favorite matchmaker and Bill Nighy stars as Mr. Woodhouse and Johnny Flynn is George Knightley.

 

 

the woman in the window by a.j finn

image via fox

Another great thriller on our list is The Woman In the Window by A.J Finn, coming to theaters in May 15 and starring Amy Adams, directed by Joe Wright. In this film, an agoraphobic woman drinks wine all day and spies on her neighbors. Nothing bad can happen from that, right? And if you’re like us and can’t wait until summer to find out, you could read the book right now – the choice is yours!

 

 

the secret garden by frances hodgson burnett

image via the silver petticoat

This classic tale from 1911 is about to become a feature film for the fourth time, and will be released on April 17, 2020! The film stars Colin Firth and Dixie Egerickx as the child protagonist, and is directed by Marc Munden. If you want, you can read the book, and watch all the adaptations before the latest movie comes to screen!

 

 

the voyages of dr. dolittle by hugh lofting

image via deadline

The second of the Doctor Dolittle novels has finally been adapted into a movie starring Robert Downey Jr. as the eccentric physician who finds out he can talk to animals. The film is simply called Dolittle and stars a number of prolific, diverse actors and comes out January 17, which gives us just about enough time to cram the book to judge if the movie does the famous book justice!

 

If this list doesn’t keep you up at night, I don’t know what will, because we here at Bookstr take film adaptations seriously and like to see for ourselves if the book actually was better than the film, or not!

 

Featured image via Bibliophile

 


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5 ‘The Witcher’ Memes to Feast Your Eyes On

Now that the The Witcher has dropped on Netflix, fans have been busy putting together memes to share on the internet. And, naturally, a ton of these are hilarious.

While I can’t unearth every single meme that this franchise has inspired, I can most certainly share a few of the ones that I felt hit their mark. Here are five Witcher memes to peruse and enjoy!

 

 

1.

image via tumblr

Regardless of if you want to be held by book Geralt, game Geralt, or Henry Cavill’s Geralt, I think this meme sums up a hidden mutual longing that we all possess. Need I say more?

 

 

2.

image via know your meme

This is a fun take on the meme of the woman yelling at the cat. We all know that Jaskier (Dandelion) drives Geralt up a wall, and in the Netflix adaptation, we got to see that at full force. This meme definitely conjures up memories of episode 6. Typically, this meme has bolded text above it explaining why the encounter is even taking place, but I couldn’t resist sharing it as it was.

 

 

 

3.

image via youtube

This meme has circulated the internet quite a bit already, but I still think it’s absolutely fantastic. Did I binge the entire season in one day? Yes. Yes I did. Did I put off my responsibilities? Yes. Did my family wonder why I had gone awfully quiet all of a sudden? Yes. Do I regret it? Nah.

 

 

4.

image via Tv and movie news

We all know the song at this point, now don’t we? We all know the word play at work here. Am I going to go listen to the song on repeat for an hour? Ha. Try three. Go big or go home.

 

 

 

5.

image via reddit

If I have to live with the reality that the next season is coming out in 2021, then so does everyone else! While I didn’t share this meme primarily out of spite, I did share it because I think most fans had a similar emotional response after a long binge. Fans of the adaptation will have to, indeed, wait until 2021 before the second season drops. So what should we do in the meantime? Well, crying is a pretty good option. Rereading the books is there too. I’m on my second watch of the Netflix series at the moment, so not all hope is lost.

 

Featured image via Reddit


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‘You’: More Than a Netflix Series

There is nothing worse than reaching the end of a show and having nothing else to look forward to. The same can be said about your favorite book.

One of the most popular shows on Netflix, You, is an adaptation of Caroline Kepnes thrilling series. The beginning of this captivating series was originally published in September, 2014. Two years later, the sequel, Hidden Bodies, was published, jump-starting the streaming adaptation that came out in 2018.

 

You depicts a story about a bookstore owner, Joe Goldberg, who becomes infatuated by a beautiful aspiring writer that strides in one day. After finding her name on her credit card, Joe makes it his job to scope out who this Guinevere Beck. All her social media accounts are public, which makes it easy for Joe to find out where she lives. Joe slithers into her life by obsessing over her friends and where she is at all hours of the day. From stalker to boyfriend, Joe becomes the perfect man for Beck. There is nothing that will come between their happiness, even if it means murder.

 

Image Via Off The Shelf

 

According to Variety, the co-writers of the series, Sera Gamble and Greg Berlanti, wanted to make sure that they were able to represent the inner monologue of Joe as the book is told in Joe’s perspective. In the show, however, the audience can see how Joe interacts with others, his inner thoughts and the battle between his words and actions.

Like many adaptations, it is hard to stay true to the book. There can be added details that weren’t there before and even some details removed. The show does just that by ensuring that Joe’s intensity for Beck is less creepy in order to be semi-appropriate for the audience.

 

 

For example, in the book, Beck is seen wearing a sweater and jeans when she walks into the bookstore. For her to appear to be different from the other women that stride inside, Gamble decided to provide her with jangly bracelets to show that Beck wants to be looked at.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Now that season two has emerged, readers have begun to seek out any differences to Hidden Bodies, as the thrill continues. Although we have just begun to dive deep into the show, Kepnes has finished the third book and is hinting at a deal for the fourth.

I can’t wait to read what Kepnes has in store and hope Gamble will be able to depict the mystery that comes along with it.

 

Featured Image Via She Reads

 

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5 Poems About Cats To Get You Ready For the Film/Uncanny Valley Nightmare “Cats”

A list of poems about cats to get you ready for the book-of-poems-turned-musical-turned-nightmarish-film called Cats? Oh yes.

For those not in the loop, the musical Cats was originally inspired by a short book of cat poems written by T.S. Eliot. Did actors and actresses walk around the stage wearing cat costumes? Yes. Has the musical become both a theatrical classic and a joke? You bet.

And now, with the film premiering in the United States in but a few days, should we be ready for an uncanny valley nightmare? Yes.

Am I still going to go watch it?

…Yeah. Yeah, I am.

And am I going to use this film’s premiere as an excuse to share five poems about cats?

Oh yeah.

Here are five poems about cats for your reading consumption.

1. “The Cat and The Moon” by W.B. Yeats

image via teepublic

The cat went here and there
And the moon spun round like a top,
And the nearest kin of the moon,
The creeping cat, looked up.
Black Minnaloushe stared at the moon,
For, wander and wail as he would,
The pure cold light in the sky
Troubled his animal blood.
Minnaloushe runs in the grass
Lifting his delicate feet.
Do you dance, Minnaloushe, do you dance?
When two close kindred meet,
What better than call a dance?
Maybe the moon may learn,
Tired of that courtly fashion,
A new dance turn. [read more]

2. “February” by Margaret Atwood

image via animalwised
Winter. Time to eat fat
and watch hockey. In the pewter mornings, the cat,
a black fur sausage with yellow
Houdini eyes, jumps up on the bed and tries
to get onto my head. It’s his
way of telling whether or not I’m dead.
If I’m not, he wants to be scratched; if I am
He’ll think of something. He settles
on my chest, breathing his breath
of burped-up meat and musty sofas,
purring like a washboard. Some other tomcat,
not yet a capon, has been spraying our front door,
declaring war. It’s all about sex and territory,
which are what will finish us off
in the long run. Some cat owners around here
should snip a few testicles. If we wise
hominids were sensible, we’d do that too,
or eat our young, like sharks. [read more]

3. “Les chats” or “cats” by Charles Baudelaire (translation by william aggeler)

image via bookriot

Both ardent lovers and austere scholars
Love in their mature years
The strong and gentle cats, pride of the house,
Who like them are sedentary and sensitive to cold.

Friends of learning and sensual pleasure,
They seek the silence and the horror of darkness;
Erebus would have used them as his gloomy steeds:
If their pride could let them stoop to bondage. [read more]

4. “The cats will know” by cesare Pavese (translation by geoffrey brock)

image via pinterest
Rain will fall again
on your smooth pavement,
a light rain like
a breath or a step.
The breeze and the dawn
will flourish again
when you return,
as if beneath your step.
Between flowers and sills
the cats will know.
There will be other days,
there will be other voices.
You will smile alone.
The cats will know.
You will hear words
old and spent and useless
like costumes left over
from yesterday’s parties. [read more]

5. “The Naming of Cats” by t.s. Eliot

image via Brain pickings
The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter,
     It isn’t just one of your holiday games;
You may think at first I’m as mad as a hatter
When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES.
First of all, there’s the name that the family use daily,
     Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo, or James,
Such as Victor or Jonathan, George or Bill Bailey—
     All of them sensible everyday names.
There are fancier names if you think they sound sweeter,
     Some for the gentlemen, some for the dames:
Such as Plato, Admetus, Electra, Demeter—
     But all of them sensible everyday names,
But I tell you, a cat needs a name that’s particular,
     A name that’s peculiar, and more dignified,
Else how can he keep up his tail perpendicular,
     Or spread out his whiskers, or cherish his pride?
Of names of this kind, I can give you a quorum,
     Such as Munkustrap, Quaxo, or Coricopat,
Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellylorum—
     Names that never belong to more than one cat.
But above and beyond there’s still one name left over,
     And that is the name that you never will guess;
The name that no human research can discover—
     But THE CAT HIMSELF KNOWS, and will never confess.
When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
     The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplation
     Of the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name:
          His ineffable effable
          Effanineffable
Deep and inscrutable singular name.
Cover image via Collider

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Why It’s Okay To Watch The Adaptation Before Reading The Book

I know, I know. This isn’t a popular opinion. After my list of reasons why people should read The Witcher before watching the Netflix adaptation of the books, it may also be an opinion not readily associated with me. However, I do, personally, believe that it is one hundred percent acceptable for folks to watch or play an adaptation before they read the story that it was based off of.

Why is that?

Well, there are a number of reasons. The first reason is that individuals might not even know that the book exists in the first place. Prior to first watching Howl’s Moving Castle and seeing the note beneath the title card, I had no idea that the Ghibli film was based off of a book–a book written by one of my favorite authors at that! All the same, it isn’t possible for people to keep track of every single adaptation that is released and then track down said adaptation’s literary counterpart.

image via mc crocker books – wordpress

I believe that any adaptation worth its salt will encourage individuals to then actively seek out the book to further immerse themselves in the world that they saw on the silver screen. When I learned that Howl’s Moving Castle was based off of a book, I went out and got the book and its sequel. I then proceeded to read through the book three times. I would literally finish the story and then flip back to the first page and start all over again. So, for me, I think that an adaptation can advertise the book, and in doing so, more people can seek out that story and enjoy it. Granted, the story and the film might be drastically different, but those differences might make it so that the story and the adaptation can then be viewed as entities that are unique in their own way.

but also Consider the people who struggle to read

image via readbrightly

These individuals might have dyslexia. They might have a hard time sitting still long enough to read a story. There might be some neurological elements that come into play here that make it exceedingly difficult to absorb the narrative without completely blocking out everything else. Sometimes, a film adaptation is the remedy to this situation.

There are also individuals who have difficulty finding the time or energy to read long stories. If one works a particularly taxing job, reading might not be their ideal pastime because of the focus it requires. Perhaps the only time a person has to devote to recreational reading occurs when they’re sitting in a waiting room or when their children are asleep.

 

For these individuals, an adaptation can certainly solve a number of problems. Consuming a television show or a movie doesn’t take as much time as reading a book can. Movies, more often than not, don’t usually exceed two hours; television shows range anywhere from a half hour to an hour per episode. So if an individual has a particularly restrictive schedule, they can take into account the run time of an adaptation and plan accordingly. Whereas with a book, there is more of a time commitment involved–which isn’t a bad thing. It’s just something that needs to be taken into account.

And… some people have had really bad experiences with reading

image via treehugger

I’m going to ask you, dear reader, to let me finish this point before passing judgement. I have always been an avid reader. When school and life were difficult, I would go hide in a book. It was my escape, and it was my refuge. So for me, I didn’t truly understand why some individuals that I encountered didn’t like to read.

But then I asked them.

One of my relatives told me that the reason he stopped reading after high school was because he hated the required reading that he was made to read for his literature classes. It didn’t help that he was forced to read some extremely heavy books with a short window of time. For him, it was the pressure, and he ended up feeling burnt out and disinterested from that point onward. If he watched an adaptation, then he was able to enjoy the story without experiencing the same pressure he felt while he was in school.

 

A lot of my classmates in my English program echoed this idea of burn out too. Given that several of our classes would require us to read one book a week, and then we would have to dig into the book, analyze, and answer questions on various topics related to the narrative, quite a few English majors began to hate reading outside of course work. This problem was only worsened if you had a course load where you had three or five classes that were all literature focused. Those classes would often carry the same expectation that you were reading one book a week, so that would sometimes result in an English major reading up to three to five books every week. The last thing a lot of us would want to do after reading two hundred or more pages a night for class was go and read for pleasure. This wasn’t the case for everyone, but quite a few of my classmates would opt to read for fun over breaks, and during the semester, film adaptations were ideal. It was a lot easier to sit down for two hours and watch a movie, knowing that it wouldn’t occupy the entire night. After finishing an adapted film or an episode, we could go back to studying or, even better, sleep.

So it’s okay to watch the adaptation first

image via hero machine

While I did encourage readers in my past article to read The Witcher series before watching the Netflix adaptation, I did so with the concern that many fans would judge the Netflix series based upon the decisions made in the video game… which is another adaptation and isn’t technically considered canon to the book series that Sapkowski published. To give one example: I have seen several articles written by authors that are upset at the fact that Yennefer and Ciri have more pronounced roles in the Netflix adaptation than they do in the games. Their experiences within the plot are explored, and that has upset quite a few game fans. Fans of the books know that these two characters do have ample time spent in the narrative from their points of view. So part of me feared that knee jerk reaction of a new fan of the story writing off the entire adaptation without giving it a chance because, of an article that expressed an opinion more driven by the writer’s experiences with the games.

 

While I don’t view this article as a correction of my first one, because I do stand by what I wrote, I do want to emphasize to my readers that everyone’s situation is different. We need to recognize the limitations that are imposed on others by their lives and their health.

We also need to recognize that a good adaptation should attract readers to a book series, and even if someone decides to never read the story it’s based off of, that’s okay. At the end of the day, what is important is that there are individuals who enjoy an incarnation of a story that means something to a lot of people.

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Featured Image Via Bookish