Tag: 3TR

LOSS, HISTORICAL ROM-COM, AND MYSTERY- THREE TO READ

In this week's Three to Read get introduced to three new novels! We have a beautiful adult contemporary novel revolving around losing a loved one, a swoon-worthy historical rom-com and an adventurous mystery thriller. You won't want to miss out on this awesome recommendations to add to your TBR!

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Bookstr’s Three to Read: Holiday Read! Trust Issues! Mysterious Disappearances!

Hey, fellow book lovers! Welcome to Bookstr’s Three to Read! I hope you’re prepared for this holiday as we got some great reads for you to try. I know this pandemic has been more than crazy but what better way to spend your time than deep in a book? Check out the full video below!

Hot Pick

Five Total Strangers

by Natalie D. Richards

Image via sourcebook
Synopsis: 

She thought being stranded was the worst thing that could happen. She was wrong.

Mira needs to get home for the holidays. Badly. But when an incoming blizzard results in a canceled connecting flight, it looks like she might get stuck at the airport indefinitely.

And then Harper, Mira’s glamorous seatmate from her initial flight, offers her a ride. Harper and her three friends can drop Mira off on their way home, but as they set off, Mira realizes her fellow travelers are all total strangers. And every one of them is hiding something.

Soon, roads go from slippery to terrifying. People’s belongings are mysteriously disappearing. Someone in the car is clearly lying, and may even be sabotaging the trip—but why? And can Mira make it home alive, or will this nightmare drive turn fatal?

Why:

This thrilling new read will have you on the edge of your seat as you dive deeper into Mira’s journey home. Be careful with which stranger you trust.

 

Coffee Shop read

The Noel Letter

by Richard Paul Evans

Image via Simon & Schuster
Synopsis:
After nearly two decades, Noel Post, an editor for a major New York publishing house, returns to her childhood home in Salt Lake City to see her estranged, dying father. What she believed would be a brief visit turns into something more as she inherits the bookstore her father fought to keep alive.
Reeling from loneliness, a recent divorce, and unanticipated upheavals in her world, Noel begins receiving letters from an anonymous source, each one containing thoughts and lessons about her life and her future. She begins to reacquaint herself with the bookstore and the people she left behind, and in doing so, starts to unravel the reality of her painful childhood and the truth about her family. As the holidays draw near, she receives a Christmastime revelation that changes not only how she sees the past but also how she views her future.
Why:
What better way to get into the holiday spirits with this heartwarming story. If you’re looking for a read with courage, self reflection, and perfect to get you in the mood for the holidays, this read is for you!

Dark Horse

The Girl Who Wasn’t there

by Penny Joelson
Image via sourcebook

Synopsis:

Nothing ever happens on Kasia’s street. And Kasia would know, because her chronic illness keeps her stuck at home, watching the outside world from her bedroom window. So when she witnesses what looks like a kidnapping, she’s not sure whether she can believe her own eyes…

There had been a girl in the window across the street who must have seen something too. But when Kasia ventures out to find her, she is told the most shocking thing of all: There is no girl.

Why:
You should definitely check this story out as it’s perfect for individuals interested in diverse characters. Joelson explores real life issues and chronic illness with this read!
Featured Image via bookstr

Bookstr’s Three-to-Read: Austen, Archaeology, and Assasins

Welcome back, book lovers! I am coming at you today from increasingly cozy weather and with plenty of enthusiasm to find that one book (or three) to curl up with this weekend. Let me be clear: it does not under any circumstances need to be even remotely cold for the olden curling-up-with-a-good-book to happen. But isn’t it so much nicer when it is?

Image via Amazon

HOT PICK

This one is for my fellow Austenites. Believe it or not, SP Books is releasing limited edition copies of the legitimate, longhand manuscript of Lady Susan, the only complete surviving manuscript of our favorite drawing-room hypocrisy critic’s work. This beautifully bound gem is full of irresistibly human author details like Austen’s true-to-form calligraphy and, interestingly enough, essentially no margins or interlinear space, which likely suggests our favorite Jane may have been trying to economize on paper. Sign of the times? Gimme.

Why?

Do I really need to explain much here? The world does not have enough longhand manuscripts of proto-feminist authors who are also literary legends. In a largely digital world, the magic of a person’s handwriting—seeing it, recognizing it when it often comes in the mail, learning the many shapes and angles that vary from writer to writer—is no longer a part of our daily lives, and yet it carries such a nostalgic hit of personality; who wouldn’t to get a little closer to Jane Austen’s personality?

Image via Amazon

COFFEE SHOP READ

Lightbringer is the right book end in Claire Legrand’s beloved fantasy series The Emporium Trilogy. I am not dead inside, so I’m not going to spoil it for you, but here’s a little bit about the series: it’s perfect for dark fantasy and epic fantasy readers, it features two strong female leads, and the story is told from both of their points of view. In a world of ruthless assassins, dark prophecies, and elemental magic, two queens—one foretold to be a queen of light, and the other of blood—find themselves in an imperial feud to last millenia.

Why?

Some stories are so big, they don’t fit into 300 pages. There is something about committing to a compelling saga that makes you feel like the story has committed to you right back. Anyone who appreciates quality world-building, fantastic adventure, and full-fledged female leads would do well to pick up this book (start at the beginning—Furyborn—though!).

Image via Twitter

DARK HORSE

Finally, we have book thirteen of Evans’s archaeological mystery series—Wrecked, by Mary Anna Evans.
Archaeologist Faye Longchamp learns of her friend and colleague’s suspicious drowning in what was supposed to be an underwater archaeological site. When she inspects the area and finds no trace of the shipwreck her friend meant to explore, things don’t quite add up. Additionally, when Faye learns her daughter is being romanced by a potentially dangerous man, the situation escalates a layer beyond murder mystery.

Why?

Murder mysteries and archaeology have one core characteristic in common: they are both, in some capacity, a puzzle that the living have the task of putting together if they want to get to the truth. Put them both together and you have mental jumping jacks without the extra sweaty laundry.

Stay warm and stay reading!

 

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