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'Speak' Author Is Releasing a Memoir About Sexual Assault

We all need this

In 1999, author Laurie Halse Anderson released a young adult novel entitled Speak that would result in widespread conversation and a shift in the way we view and talk about sexual assault.

 

 

Speak
Image Via Amazon

 

 

The novel spread quickly and rooted itself deep, still being something that is read and taught in classrooms across the globe today, even resulting in a movie adaptation starring Kristen Stewart.

 

 

 

 

**Speak Spoilers Ahead**

 

 

 

 

Speak is written through the perspective of high school freshman Melinda Sordino as she struggles with finding her place after being completely ostracized and isolated by her peers for calling the police during a party. Melinda begins shutting down more and more, solely expressing herself through art projects; she hardly verbalizes anything aloud at all. What her classmates and friends fail to understand is that Melinda was raped by popular senior Andy Evans at the party and, in a moment of panic and disembodiment, called the police. By the time the police arrived, Melinda found herself in a state of dissociation, unable to say what had occured. She buries the assault deep inside of her, confiding in no one.

 

 

Speak is brutal, honest, and so, heartbreakingly real in the way it describes sexual assault it sparked a fire of conversation revolving around a side of sexual assault and rape culture that hadn't yet been seen in the media. I remember first reading the book when I was about eleven years-old and the impact and mark it imprinted on me; it's a novel I've never been able to forget.

 

 

Laurie Halse Anderson was inspired by her own sexual assault to write the novel, hoping to incite some sort of change. Now twenty years later and frustrated with the fact that, although the conversation regarding rape culture has changed, the culture itself is still very much problematic, Anderson has penned a new memoir centered around the subject.

 

 

The memoir is called Shout and is a free-verse work of nonfiction detailed Anderson's own rape, her fight to overcome the emotional aftermath, and her journey into finding some sort of healing. Anderson recently spoke out about the upcoming memoir, saying:

 

 

I lost my voice for a very long time after I was raped. I lost myself, too. Shout is a poetry tapestry that shares the darkness of my silent years and shows how writing helped me speak up. Shout is a declaration of war against rape culture and a celebration of survival.

 

 

And, in a time of sexual assault being so prevalent it seems like there's a new case appearing in the media daily, this memoir can't come soon enough.The way we speak about rape and assault has shifted and progressed so much that it can be easy to feel like society, as a whole, has finally progressed past it. But believing that would be ignoring that disgusting-but-real truth that one woman is assaulted in America every 98 seconds. Just because sexual assault is being talked about widely and predators like Harvey Weinstein have been brought down, doesn't mean we can grow complacent.

 

 

According to RAINN 1 out of every six American women will be the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime (this statistic increases to 1 out of four women while attending college in the United States). And 94% of sexual assault victims will suffer from PTSD.

 

 

 

RAINN Statistic
Image Via RAINN

 

Sexual assault is so prevalent within our society I don't think I, personally, know any women who haven't been sexually assaulted or raped. It's vital that we keep speaking up about it and that we listen when others rise to share their stories. It's so weighing for women to be living in a constant state of fear, of never walking home alone at night, of "please stop following me", of "text me when you get home safe" because we all know the reality of danger constantly hanging over our heads.

 

 

There can no longer be a stigma surrounding this because our well-being, and the well-being of our sisters, is always at risk. Laura Halse Anderson is doing such brave, powerful, revolutionary work (work that she's been doing for the past two decades). You can't miss out on this book. Share it with your family and friends. Keep standing up and speaking out.

 

 

And if you're one of the many of us who've been victims of sexual violence, understand that it is no way your fault. You are not alone because you are standing alongside all of us, arm in arm.

 

 

And if you need to speak to someone, don't be afraid to call the 24 Hour National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673

 

 

Shout is set to release March, 2019.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Feminist Guide to Hollywood