7 Memoirs That Deserve an Adaptation

Memoirs are often sources of harrowing, eye-opening, and inspiring stories. Many of them have been adapted into iconic adaptation such as The Glass Castle, Girl, Interrupted, and The Pianist. Here are some other memoirs that we think deserve equally great adaptations.

Educated: A Memoir de [Tara Westover]

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Educated is a memoir by Tara Westover about her quest for knowledge from rural Idaho to Cambridge University. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, in seventeen years of her life Tara had never stepped inside a classroom. In the isolation that her family lived in, there was no one to make sure that the children were receiving an education or to stop the violence going on inside the family. When one of her older brothers gets into college, she decides to pursue an education away from home and begin her own life.

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Focused around the small house in Bloomington, Indiana, In the Dream House is an account of a relationship gone bad. This cozy domestic abode soon turns into a harrowing locus of emotional abuse. Machado describes the lead up to the relationship, the months of attacks, and the roller-coaster aftermath in chapters that seem like pieces of different puzzles.

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Previously adapted into a musical, Fun Home tells the story of Alison Bechdel and her tumultuous relationship with her father, an English teacher and director of the town funeral home, which Alison and her family referred to as the “Fun Home.” In college, Alison, who had just come out as a lesbian, discovers that her late father was also gay, which leaves her with a legacy of mystery to resolve.

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A memoir about a big family and their beloved home. 1961, Sarah M. Broom’s mother Ivory Mae bought a shotgun house in the then-promising neighborhood of New Orleans East and built her world inside of it. Widowed, Ivory Mae remarried Sarah’s father Simon Broom; their combined family would eventually number twelve children. But after Simon died, six months after Sarah’s birth, the Yellow House would become Ivory Mae’s thirteenth and most unruly child.

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“Just Kids, Patti Smith’s first book of prose, the legendary American artist offers a never-before-seen glimpse of her remarkable relationship with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in the epochal days of New York City and the Chelsea Hotel in the late sixties and seventies.”

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Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met—a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates “like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972.” His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church’s country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents’ rectory, their two worlds collide.

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After a lifetime of prejudice and persecution and outraged by Trayvon Martin’s killer going free, Patrisse’s outrage led her to co-found Black Lives Matter with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi. Condemned as terrorists and as a threat to America, they women founded a hashtag that birthed the movement to demand accountability from the authorities who continually turn a blind eye to the injustices inflicted upon people of Black and Brown skin.

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