5 Books Inspired By Celtic Mythology

Celtic mythology is, by far, one of my favorite things to discuss. Ever. I’ve spent a good chunk of the past two years studying and reading the myths and legends for my own personal research, and I’ve come away wanting to learn even more. The tales are beautiful and the mythical beings–be they deities or other magical creatures–are enthralling. Personally, I think one of the best way to share these myths and legends is through stories like the ones listed below. After all, intrigued individuals will seek out the source material, and they will be able to see what inspired the authors who borrowed from said material.

Here are five books inspired by Celtic mythology.

 

 

1. Daughter of the forest

image via goodreads

This is the first book in Juliet Marillier‘s Sevenwaters series. It should be noted that there is a very heavy romance component to these stories. I also want to add, for the individuals who need this note, that there is a sexual assault scene in this story. This series follows four generations of the Sevenwaters family, a family that has maintained a relationship with the people of the Otherworld–also known as the Fae. The Daughter of The Forest follows Sorcha, a member of the Sevenwaters family and the only daughter of Lord Colum. After his wife’s death, Lord Colum marries an enchantress who curses Sorcha’s brothers. She can only save her siblings by remaining silent as she carries out the will of the Fae and their Queen.  When Sorcha is kidnapped by enemies of her family, it looks like all hope is lost. Will she save her brothers? Read and find out…

2. Hounded

image via goodreads

This isn’t the first time that I have mentioned Kevin Hearne‘s Iron Druid Chronicles in a list. Hearne has a fun way of pulling from different mythologies and making the tales and characters dance together so well that I couldn’t resist putting Hounded on this list. The series follows Atticus O’Sullivan, the last living druid. Atticus runs an occult book shop in Arizona where he sells magic teas to his customers. A sword comes into the picture here, and it proceeds to set off a chain of events that Atticus gets involved in. This series is a blend of urban fantasy and mythology.

3. Heir of Fire

image via goodreads

Heir of Fire is the third book in Sarah J. MaasThrone of Glass series–which is made up of eight books (if you include the novella collection). While Maas has made reference to the Fae and magic in the previous two books, readers get to read about them in more depth in this installment. Readers are introduced to Queen Maeve, a figure who has both mythical and historical roots. Maas also portrays a version of the Fae in both the first book of the series and the final book, and this version falls more into line with the tales that say that the Fae are small beings of nature. She also presents the image of the Fae as simultaneously being godlike while also being lords and ladies, which are portrayals that have also been attached to these beings as well. While there are, technically, two books before this one, this is where the story is truly set into motion.

 

 

4. The cruel prince

image via goodreads

Holly Black‘s The Cruel Prince, and the other books in The Folk of the Air series, has gained a great deal of attention. Our main character, Jude, was still a child when her parents were murdered and she and her siblings were captured by the Fae. Though she was captured by them, Jude still wants to be a part of the Faerie court. In this book, Jude learns that she has the capacity for trickery–a trait that the Fae often possess and can be observed using in tales and myths. Ultimately, Jude will have to put her life on the line to protect her sisters.

5. Lament: The faerie queen’s deception

image via goodreads

Maggie Stiefvater‘s book Lament: The Faerie Queen’s Deception follows Deirdre Monaghan, a young musician who can see faeries. A faerie soldier and a faerie assassin are tracking Deirdre, and their goal is to kill her before her music can attract the attentions of the Fae and weaken the Faerie Queen’s authority over her people. In Irish lore, the Fae would sometimes kidnap mortals who were musically gifted, and this could lead to a number of things happening to the human–sometimes the human would be forced to remain with the Fae forever, and that was one of the kinder fates awaiting said person.

Featured Image Via Get Wallpapers

 

 


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