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11 Audiobooks Narrated by Your Favorite Actors

There is always something enticing about listening to a good story; plus, when our favorite actors are narrating the book, it feels as if there’s an intimate connection. Luckily, actors typically enjoy narrating for audiobooks because these opportunities give them the chance to enhance their vocal skills in relatively reclusive environment undisturbed by paparazzi. Here’s a list of celebrities who have narrated one or more audiobooks available for purchase on Audible.

 

Captions courtesy of Publisher’s summary.

 

1. Nora Ephron’s Heartburn read by Meryl Streep

 

Amazon and Vogue

Images via Amazon and Vogue

 

Seven months into her pregnancy, Rachel Samstat discovers that her husband, Mark, is in love with another woman. The fact that the other woman has “a neck as long as an arm and a nose as long as a thumb and you should see her legs” is no consolation. Food sometimes is, though, since Rachel writes cookbooks for a living. And in between trying to win Mark back and loudly wishing him dead, Ephron’s irrepressible heroine offers some of her favorite recipes. Heartburn is a sinfully delicious novel, as soul-satisfying as mashed potatoes and as airy as a perfect soufflé.

 

2. J.G. Ballard’s High-Rise read by Tom Hiddleston

 

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Images via Amazon and Storypick

 

When a class war erupts inside a luxurious apartment block, modern elevators become violent battlegrounds, and cocktail parties degenerate into marauding attacks on “enemy” floors. Human society slips into violent reverse as once-peaceful residents, driven by primal urges, re-create a world ruled by the laws of the jungle.

 

3. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz read by Anne Hathaway

 

Befunky

Images via Amazon and Muzul

 

Follow the adventures of young Dorothy Gale and her dog Toto as they get swept away into the magical land of Oz , where they encounter characters and places you may remember from the movie – and several more that never made it to the big screen – on an unforgettable journey to the Emerald City.

 

4. Cassandra Clare’s The Mortal Instruments: City of Heavenly Fire read by Sophie Turner

 

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Images via Amazon and Kildare Nationalist

 

Darkness has descended on the Shadowhunter world. Chaos and destruction overwhelm the Nephilim as Clary, Jace, Simon, and their friends band together to fight the greatest evil they have ever faced: Clary’s own brother. Nothing in this world can defeat Sebastian – but if they journey to the realm of demons, they just might have a chance….

 

5. Graham Greene’s The End of the Affair read by Colin Firth

 

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Images via Amazon and Survival

 

The End of the Affair, set in London during and just after World War II, is the story of a flourishing love affair between Maurice Bendrix and Sarah Miles. After a violent episode at Maurice’s apartment, Sarah suddenly and without explanation breaks off the affair. This very intimate story about what actually constitutes love is enhanced by Mr. Firth’s narration, who said “this book struck me very, very particularly at the time when I read it and I thought my familiarity with it would give the journey a personal slant.”

 

6. Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale read by Clare Danes

 

Audiobooks

Images via Amazon and the Beauty Bean

 

After a violent coup in the United States overthrows the Constitution and ushers in a new government regime, the Republic of Gilead imposes subservient roles on all women. Offred, now a Handmaid tasked with the singular role of procreation in the childless household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife, can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost everything, even her own name. Despite the danger, Offred learns to navigate the intimate secrets of those who control her every move, risking her life for mere glimpses of her former freedom, and records her story for future listeners.

 

7. Emile Zola’s Therese Raquin read by Kate Winslet

 

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Images via Amazon and Famous People

 

Thérèse Raquin is the story of a young woman forced into an unhappy marriage to her dull, sickly cousin and smothered by her overbearing aunt. When her husband’s childhood friend enters her life, it leads to a torrid affair that sets her spirit free for the first time, but with shattering consequences. Steeped in the atmosphere of 19th-century France and with a darkly rich foreboding, it is a story that brings out the best of its narrator’s incomparable talents.

 

8. Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse read by Nicole Kidman

 

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Images via Amazon and Adweek

 

Split into three parts, the story observes Mrs. Ramsay, Mr. Ramsey, and their children at their vacation house on the Isle of Skye. While the novel follows seemingly trivial events between the family members, the plot takes a backseat to philosophical introspection, which gave the novel its fame as an icon of modernist literature. The Ramseys’ quest to recapture meaning creates a powerful allegory of man’s impermanent battle with the tangible world.

 

9. Chester Himes’ A Rage in Harlem read by Samuel L. Jackson

 

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Images via Amazon and Vulture

 

Himes, described by The Sunday Times as “the greatest find in American crime fiction since Raymond Chandler”, was no stranger to the world of crime: in his late teens and early 20s, he served 7 years in the Ohio State Penitentiary for armed robbery, the confession to which was beaten out of him by the police. He delivers the tale of his hopelessly naïve hero suddenly finding himself on the run from a hypocritical and far-from-heroic police force with lurid violence and brutal humor. There is no voice better than Mr. Jackson’s to narrate this hardboiled story of love and crime, set in a richly imagined, mid-20th century Harlem.

 

10. Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice read by Rosamund Pike

 

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Images Via NewsOK and Dimitrios Kambouris

 

In Pride and Prejudice, the Bennett sisters try to find their way in the repressive strictures of 19th-century society. Austen shows the folly of judging by first impressions and the experience of falling in love, and she superbly describes a world which, despite being more than two centuries old, still resonates with modern concerns.

 

11. Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express read by Dan Stevens

 

Images via Amazon and TV Guide

Images via Amazon and TV Guide

 

“The murderer is with us – on the train now…” 

Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Samuel Edward Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. One of his fellow passengers must be the murderer. 

Isolated by the storm, detective Hercule Poirot must find the killer among a dozen of the dead man’s enemies, before the murderer decides to strike again….

 

Feature image courtesy of AMReading

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