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10 Best Book Titles of All-Time

The easiest way into a book is the title. If a title is interesting, most readers are quick to become intrigued, eager to delve in. If a title is drab and unexciting, some readers may expect the book to be the same and lose interest. With that in mind, here are the ten best book titles to get a reader stoked.

1. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick


One of the legendary media titles of all-time, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has a lot to do with androids and a little bit to do with electric sheep. It hints at one of the more pressing questions about robotics, though, which is the capacity for robots to think – Philip Dick was considering the issue in 1968. The book was the basis for the movie Blade Runner.

2. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

If you were to see this Celeste Ng novel in a bookstore, you would probably think, “That’s going to be a really sad story about someone dying.” And you would be right. The title grips a reader because they want to know what wasn’t told and why it wasn’t told. Everything I Never Told You is so much more than a sob story, though, and that’s why it won countless awards back in 2014.

3. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (and Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling

Mindy Kaling gets right to the heart of the issue in this comedic autobiography. Let’s be real: we all ask this question when we’re laying in bed on a Friday night, curled up with a book. At least if we’re reading Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? we’ll have Mindy by our side! 

4. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test screams cool, since nothing is cooler than Kool-Aid…and electricity. And LSD, especially in the 1960s. Tom Wolfe’s nonfiction story details the touring life and LSD use of a band. That’s a pretty cool story to tell.

5. Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea by Chelsea Handler

Instead of looking for God, Chelsea Handler is looking for a drink in Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea. It’s funny and blatant, just like the comedian. The best-selling autobiography of essays helped to launch Handler into even greater fame.

6. The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

Before it was a feature film (and soon-to-be Broadway musical), The Devil Wears Prada was a best-selling book. Lauren Weisberger’s title sticks so well because of the imagery it invokes, with an illusion of a fiery being wearing Prada heels. We’ve probably all met someone like this, too… 

7. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is now a successful stage adaptation, but the title lacks some originality; it’s actually a Sherlock Holmes quote from an Sir Arthur Conan Doyle short story. Mark Haddon applies it perfectly, however, to the story about a savant who is just a bit different than everyone else.

8. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

One of the best selling self-help books of all-time, How to Win Friends and Influence People immediately gets to the point. Dale Carnegie wanted people to be influenced by his book about influencing people and a title about finding success was the perfect way to get people’s attention.

9. Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett

The classic children’s book uses a spectacular image to grab people’s attention: Could you imagine looking up in the sky and seeing meatballs beginning to rain down? That’s the colorful image the equally colorful book creates with its title. Judi Barrett’s then-husband, Ron Barrett, helped the title come to life with some stunning illustrations.

10. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Love in the Time of Cholera is one of the most respected books of all-time. It helps to have a title that raises the stakes before a reader even opens the novel. Gabriel Garcia Marquez notes “time” in his title, but the story has a tragic, timeless quality about it. You already know that a story of love during an epidemic that killed thousands will be heart-wrenching.