Category: Satire

9 Most Hilarious NBC & SNL ‘Game of Thrones’ Parodies

Game of Thrones is coming to end.

Well, HBO is developing a prequel series and George R.R. Martin still has to finish the series, so Game of Thrones will live on on the silver screen and on the page. But the main show, the only show as of now, the show that brought many of us to this fantastic story and allowed book readers to sit back with smug looks on their faces, is coming to a close.

In honor of that, let us sit back and reflect.

And laugh a little as we go through all the parodies of Game of Thrones through the last nine years (that’s nearly a decade of murder over a big chair!)

 

1. Game of Desk – NBC

 

Jimmy Fallon, Game of Desks

Image Via NBC

Let’s run back to May 24, 2013. You might not have been in your comfy seat, but you felt that warm and fuzzy feeling as a smile came across your face.

 

Jimmy Fallon as Jon Snow

Image Via The Daily Beast

Recall that smile, and together we’ll watch back when times were simple. Among other things, Jimmy Fallon was the host of Late Night on NBC. He and his teams of expert writers transformed the 30 Rockefeller Center into its own version of Westeros. The Iron Thrones became the Iron Desk, Dragons were Peacocks, and the Red Wedding hadn’t aired yet.

Sorry I reminded you.

 

2. Game of Game of Thrones- S.N.L

 

Game of Game of Thrones

Image Via NBC

On Sep 25, 2013 we were graced with this wonderful parody. Bill Hader, future Richard Tozier in It Chapter 2, stands before three super fans played by Taran Killam and Aidy Bryant, but the third fan, Duncan (Zach Galifianakis) has come dressed as a dragon. Why is Jaime called Kingslaver? Who killed Half-hand? Easy questions, but Duncan is asked this: What is the capitol of Wisconsin?

Oh, I feel attacked, and the sketch isn’t even in full swing yet.

 

3 – George RR Martin – S.N.L

 

George RR Martin - SNL

Image Via SNL

Even back in 2014 we were making jokes about how slow George writes. Oh, if only we knew.

But if want to know why George R R Martin hasn’t finished The Winds of Winter and Dreams of Spring yet? Well on April 6, 2014 we got an answer, sort of.

It’s exactly what George R R Martin would say if he actually let loose and spoke his mind.

Bonus points if you want to know how he got to name the White Walkers?

 

The Night King

Image Via The Independent

I’ll give you a hint: a white guy just walked past me.

 

4. Jon Snow at a Dinner Party – NBC

 

Jon Snow at a Dinner Party - NBC

Image Via Uproxx

What happens when you bring a brooding Jon Snow to a dinner party in a Brooklynn Townhouse? On April 7, 2015, five days before season 5’s premiere, Seth Myers learned that winter was coming. Spring has sprung, he prattled, but Jon Snow gave his usual warning, “Winter is coming.”

“So much for global warming,” one patrons jests.

“You won’t be laughing when the white walkers rip you limb from limb.”

It’s funny because the Night King hadn’t risen the dead in front of our eyes.

 

5. Melisandre at a Baby Shower – NBC

 

Melisandre at a baby shower

Image Via The Daily Dot

Hope you didn’t have a baby shower before Feb 18, 2016, because you might have invited the wrong guest. Seth Meyers did in his sketch on Late Night where he brought the Red Priestess herself, Melsiandre, to a baby shower. “The night is dark and full of terrors,” she warned, sitting in a room with not only Seth Myers, but his pregnant wife and human rights attorney Alexi Ashe. At least didn’t set anyone on fire.

Oh, wait.

 

6.  Game of Thrones Season 6 – S.N.L

Game of Thrones Season 6- SNL randy
Image Via Inverse
On April 3, 2016, SNL gave the stage to Peter Dinklage and Emilia Clarke (Kate McKinnon) as they took viewers behind the scenes on Game of Thrones’ sixth season, giving us our first look of Tyrion with the pre-CGI Dragons. Yes, they sound like raptors but Randy is hilarious.
And if Drogon sounds like Randy, then he totally should talk.
Jon Snow - SNL
Image Via Business Insider

Back on May 8, 2016 it was a simpler time. “Jon Snow is dead!” all the characters say, while we the audience sat back and said, “Shut up and bring him back.” In this sketch, Cecily Strong and S.N.L host Brie Lawson (Captian Marvel) act as audience surrogates, showing that maybe things were a lot easier during episodes 601 and 602 when we know what was coming.

The best part is Jon keeps waking up and being told “Not yet!” by Melsiandre.

 

8 . Game of Jones – NBC

 

Leslie Jones and Seth Meyers
Image Via NBC

Aired Aug 9, 2017, it’s less of a parody but more of a commentary. Seth Meyers steps by Leslie Jones’s apartment to listen her live instead of just reading, like most of us, her live-tweets.

Watch it. No spoilers, but Varys stops by just Jamie meets Drogon, as well as Daenerys Targaryen, for the first time.

 

9.  Khal Drogo Ghost Dogo- S.N.L

 

Game of Thrones Season 6- SNL, Drago's Ghost Dojo

Image Via Paste Magazine

You might remember this one since this sketch only aired on Dec 8, 2018. It’s KHAL DROGO’S GHOST DOJO! It’s a place where all the characters who died on Game of Thrones can go. With Khal Drogo there for Dothraki public access, what can go wrong?

 

Viserys Death

Image Via Science Alert

Either way you cut it, its laugh-out-loud hilarious to see Khal Drogo meet several other dead characters. The first guest is a punch in the gut, however, since it’s the lovable puff-bag Hodor. Honestly, that “hold the door” joke was as painful as the Red Wedding. At least they made it up with hearing him actually speak in coherent sentences.

On a related note, sorry for bringing up the Red Wedding. I know you probably forget about it.

Oh, who am I kidding? The North Remembers.

 

Featured Image Via Nerdist

Kurt Vonnegut Portrait

The 50th Anniversary of ‘Slaughterhouse-Five’ is Upon Us

I wish I could tell you the exact circumstances under which I first encountered Kurt Vonnegut‘s Slaughterhouse-Five for the first time, but I can’t. Not exactly. I’m not sure whether it was assigned reading in one of my middle school English classes or if I just stumbled upon it. The latter makes more sense when taking into consideration two facts: a lot of schools had banned books like Slaughterhouse-Five, and I was a pretty awful student back when George W. was in the white house. What I do remember is that when I first began reading the soon to be fifty-year-old novel (March 31th) I was in a white, windowless room, being stared at by a teacher who had clearly drawn the short straw that afternoon. Detention. I would like to think that Mr. Vonnegut would find irony in that scenario; perhaps it would even make him smile.

 

Image Via Thetakeout.com

 

Or Not.

Imagine being an unsuspecting delinquent, opening Slaughterhouse-Five or The Children’s Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death for the first time: I was blown away by how psychedelic it was. Vonnegut’s prose was irreverent, ridiculous, and, above all, courageous. Vonnegut plunged blindly into the abyss of existential uncertainty and danced in the darkness. One of the most imaginative novels ever written with a minimalist style—Slaughterhouse-Five felt like Vonnegut knew a hell of a lot more about the world and grammar than me and was choosing words that I could understand. Maybe there was nothing to understand? It was pretty damn cool. Vonnegut made literature cool—especially for a kid in detention.

 

 

Image Via wrbh.org

 

In the introduction to Slaughterhouse-Five, Vonnegut explains how he had been trying to write about the firebombing of Dresden during World War II ever since his imprisonment there. This is the reason that Slaughterhouse’s protagonist, Billy Pilgrim, was also in Dresden during the bombing. Billy’s story is an interesting one—the narrative of his life involves just as much love, humor, and tragedy as anything you could probably imagine. What makes it uber unique is that Billy acquires a certain amount of objectivity similar to the reader’s own. Billy is “unstuck” in time as he has no control over where and when in his life he might be at any given moment. One moment, Billy could be at his daughter’s wedding—the next, fornicating with a movie star. It’s all very non-linear. This ability is supposedly a side-effect of his Tralfamadorian kidnapping; extraterrestrial beings teach Billy to see time in a very Matthew McConaughey-like (Interstellar) way. All moments are permanent, always happening, forever. Billy is most definitely an unreliable narrator throughout, and Slaughterhouse-Five‘s chaos can undoubtedly be interpreted in a variety of ways. All I knew at that time was that I needed more Vonnegut.

 

Image Via Quickmeme.com

 

Vonnegut is famous for incorporating reoccurring elements into his novels, such as characters, names, and themes. (He also likes to write himself into his stories and could be considered a pioneer of “meta,” but that’s beside the point.) One of the things about Slaughterhouse-Five I found most compelling was the incorporation of the Tralamadorians or the planet Tralamadore. So I followed the Tralamdorians. Tralamdore is the name of various fictional planets in Kurt Vonnegut’s novels; the race and history of the planet vary from novel to novel (Slaughterhouse-Five; God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater; Hocus Pocus; and Timequake). My alien chasing eventually led me to one of Vonnegut’s earlier novels, The Sirens of Titan.

 

Image Via Goodreads.com

 

While not as popular as Slaughterhouse, The Sirens of Titan is considered by some to be Vonnegut’s best novel. (Maybe just me… no, I read someone else say that before. I’m sure of it.) Douglas Adams has even cited Sirens as being his inspiration for The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. Written ten years prior to Slaughterhouse-Five‘s publication, simply to satisfy Vonnegut’s publisher as they awaited Cat’s Cradle, Sirens is considered less “experimental.” Although the story is linear and Vonnegut himself does not make an appearance—its message is anything but typical.

Sirens follows Malachi Constant, a man with an extraordinary amount of luck—men and women of the cloth might even call his luck divine (although Vonnegut would make fun of them for doing so).  At the beginning of the novel, the reader meets Malachi’s father, Noel, who builds the family fortune buying stocks based on words from the book of Genesis. Malachi inherits this fortune and builds upon it, becoming the wealthiest playboy in the world.

One day, Malachi is invited to witness the materialization of a man, Winston Niles Rummford, whose existence has been stretched across space and time (due to a mishap with his dog and something called a chrono-synclastic infundibulum), similar to Billy Pilgrim’s conundrum. Rummford’s ability to read minds and predict the future startles Malachi as Rummford tells him about his future. In addition, he shows Malachi a photograph of the most beautiful women Malachi has ever seen—women who supposedly inhabit the planet of Titan. As Malachi tries to outwit Rummford’s manipulation and pursue the kind of unattainable beauty of the women in the photo, the reader goes on a nihilistic yet humorous journey through space. It is with an engrossing amount of ridiculousness that the novel contemplates free-will, morality, and existence.

Some might find the novel’s humor cold. Others may find its message to be a commentary on the futility of fighting fate or attempting to understand it, given that even the novel’s omniscient character succumbs to the inevitable. I found the novel’s climatic revelation actually quite moving.

 

Mild Spoiler Alert!

 

After years of space travel, mind control, a Martian invasion, and a religion formed in his honor (sort of), Malachi finally finds himself on Titan. There, Vonnegut reveals that the beautiful sirens from Rummford’s photo are inanimate statues on an uninhabited planet. In fact, the only people who reside on Titan are Malachi and his family. As Malachi sits there, alongside a woman he never intended to be with and a son that thinks he’s a bird (didn’t I say ridiculousness?) he realizes that the “purpose of human life, no matter who is controlling it, is to love whoever is around to be loved.”

Vonnegut wrote both Slaughterhouse and Sirens with a serious outpouring of emotions—but, most importantly, he wrote with immense joy. He loved writing: he did it to discover more about the world and himself. In 2006, a group of students from a high school in New York City was assigned the task of writing to their favorite author. Their letters warranted the following response, which I think epitomizes the heart and soul behind 50+ years of kick-ass storytelling:

Image Via Letters of Note

 

 

Featured Image Via My Student Voices.

See the First Trailer for George Clooney’s ‘Catch-22’!

George Clooney is back with a mini-series adaptation of the acclaimed classic Catch-22 by author Joseph Heller.

 

Image via Amazon.

 

The book, set during World War 2 ,  focuses on the life of Captain John Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. The plot mainly follows the fictional 256th Squadron, while they attempt to maintain their sanity while fulfilling their service requirements so that they may return home.

As heavy as the topic of war is overall, Heller’s novel is famously humorous, and manages to make a pretty amusing story out of the psychological struggle of surviving the scourge of war under an unsupportive government that does not want its soldiers to leave the battlefield. Sounds like one heck of a ride!

Clooney is directing, executive producing and starring in the role of Lt. General Scheisskopf, alongside Hugh Laurie as Major de Coverley and  Kyle Chandler as Colonel Catchart, alongside Christopher Abbott, who you might know from the hit series The Sinner and HBO’s series Girls who will play Captain Yossarian.

 

Snapshot of the 265th squadron. | Image via Philipe Antonello/Hulu.

 

Clooney’s new mini-series will debut on Hulu in the US on May 17th and will be broadcast on Channel 4 shortly thereafter.

 

Image result for catch 22 adaptation cast

George Clooney as Lt. General Scheisskopf. | Image via Philipe Antonello/Hulu.

 

Related image

Hugh Laurie as Major de Coverley. | Image via Philipe Antonello/Hulu.

 

Kyle Chandler as Colonel Catchart. | Image via Philipe Antonello/Hulu.

 

Christopher Abbott as Captain Yossarian. | Image via Philipe Antonello/Hulu.

 

In addition to photos, we also have our first trailer! Check it out here!

 

 

So say goodbye Nesspresso commercials, and let’s welcome George Clooney back to what he does best!

 

Featured Image Via Consequence of Sound.

Beloved Children’s Author Tomi Ungerer, Dies at 87

If you’re like me, an anxious contradiction suffering from a hint of narcissism induced by a lingering quarter-life crisis, then you may often feel like time is running out. It’s not, we know that; we just figured we’d accomplish everything we ever dreamed of before the age of thirty…

The one thing that calms us and brings us together, the thing we can always take solace in, is the power of stories.

This begins when we’re young; reading stories like Peter Rabbit, The Ugly Duckling, Little Red Riding Hood, perhaps even more subversive stories like The Light PrincessThe Princess and The Goblin, Zeralda’s Ogre, or Otto: The Autobiography of a Teddy Bear. Later some of us move on to comic books about superheroes achieving the impossible, defying limitations. Now we read denser things, fiction that aims to dissect the human condition. In the end, nothing beats the didactic nature of a child’s tale. The purpose of these disjointed introductory paragraphs is to bring to you the unfortunate news of legendary artist, Tomi Ungerer‘s death—a man who understood Imagination’s ability to eliminate fear.

 Image Via Culto.latercera.com

An article on The Guardian‘s website, written in 2012, discusses the legendary, yet under-appreciated children’s book innovator, refering to how Ungerer’s humor could be described as “crazy” how his work contains “surprising” and “inexplicable” details created by a sometimes controversial, and truly wacky soul. The author of the article describes the man as apologetic for his nature upon meeting him; spouting countless aphorisms, and energy propelled by the type of insecurities that plague the wisest of men. Ungerer describes his approach to children’s literature:

“Curiosity is vital. The finest gift you can give your children is a magnifying glass, so with a little effort they can make their own discoveries.” To make it too easy is to curb the instinct to explore.

The French author and artist seemed to epitomized the expression “tongue in cheek.” He was aware of himself and of the world, he understood the power of language and visuals. His work subverts genre expectations, particularly in regard to his children ‘s books, as his stories convey their own brand of social satire. What would appear to be simple, relatable stories carry layered messages that pull your soul in the right direction.

Image Via Amazon.com

Whether it be his story Moon Man, about an alien who just wants to be accepted by humanity or The Three Robbers, about a girl who turns greed on its head, the books are charming and relatable, entertaining to both old and young. He was one of the pioneer’s of the age-defying child’s narrative, the type of stories parents can read with their children. The types of stories that remind adults that maybe they don’t have to grow up in the traditional sense; that wonderment and political naivety of a child may be relevant in the most excruciating of times…

His lengthy and unmatched career has resulted in the publication of over 140 books (in German, English, and French), various political posters, and some erotic stuff that doesn’t really make sense to mention in the context of this article…(but riveting and a true testament to his diversity). The range and depth of Ungerer’s skills appeared to never cease—a well that was dug through the bottom of the earth, reaching eternity. At one point he even designed the poster for the classic comedy Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Image Via Imdb.com

Tomi Ungerer became the first ever Ambassador for Childhood and Education for the Council of Europe and has a museum dedicated to him in Strasbourg: a first for a French artist. His experiences as a child living in German-occupied France inspired the book Tomi: A Childhood Under the Nazis and shed a light on the perspective of a man who hated only a couple things in this life: intolerance and discrimination. In 1976, Ungerer moved to Ireland with his wife and recently died in Goleen, Co Cork at the age of eighty-seven.

Tomi Ungerer vor seinen Zeichnungen bei einer Ausstellung in Straßburg 2010.

Image Via Berliner-zeitung.de

People have reacted to his passing on Twitter, honoring Ungerer:

It was a tweet I found on Tomi Ungerer’s personal Twitter page that moves me the most; the following video contains an interview with Ungerer, where he expresses one of the most optimistic and inspiring outlooks on death I think I’ve ever had the great pleasure of hearing. Ungerer’s legacy was sculpted by a man full of life, a life unaffected by superficial things like time and age: he was a painter, writer, intellectual, folk hero, legend, a god damn superhero with the power of imagination.

 

 

Featured Image Via Instagram.com