Category: Paranormal

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Based on the NY Times Bestseller, this TV adaptation of A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness blends drama, history, romance and fantasy in this wonderful tale. Watch Diana Bishop, a history of science professor, learn that witches, vampires, and other magical creatures exist after discovering a special book at the Bodleian Library.

Join her as she makes magical friends and enemies. But the question remains: is she ready for this new magical world?

Tune in on Sunday, April 7th at 9/8c on AMC!

A NY Times review of the TV adaptation says: “The real action, however, involves the interspecies affair — banned by centuries-old tradition! — between Diana and Matthew. It’s a love for the ages that starts out kind of stalkery, the way these things do, and graduates to torrid but clothed canoodling enacted by the commensurately gorgeous [Teresa] Palmer and [Matthew] Goode.”

Entertainment Weekly calls the book,“A thoroughly grown-up novel packed with gorgeous historical detail and a gutsy, brainy heroine to match. . . . Harkness writes with thrilling gusto about the magical world.”

 

TUNE IN SUNDAYS 9/8C ON AMC!

Horror Noire Sheds Light on a Forgotten Genre of Film History

Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror has been making the rounds recently. Released as an exclusive on Shudder, the documentary explores the history of black people in the horror genre, from the ugly roots where black people were written as literal monsters by films such as Birth of a Nation to modern black horror film Get Out. The documentary has received critical acclaim for exploring a topic often swept under the rug or ignored entirely. But what’s lesser well known is that Horror Noire is based on a book. This book, Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present by Robin R. Means Coleman explores the same topic in its pages, providing an excellent companion piece to the documentary or vice versa.

 

Duane Jones plays Ben in Night of the Living Dead
Image Via Horror News Network

 

Coleman’s interest in the black horror genre began with seeing Night of the Living Dead on rotation at a drive in theatre. In that film, Ben is one of the first significant black protagonists represented onscreen in a non-stereotypical fashion. He takes charge of the situation and lasts beyond his white peers, until the end of the film. There, Ben is shot and disposed of by a group of men hunting down zombies. He’s cast aside with the other dead, his body burned as the credits roll over this image, a terrifying end to the film. This film made an impact on Coleman and began her scholarly research in horror.

 

The book cover of Horror Noire by Robin R. Means Coleman
Image Via Horror News Network

 

In the book, Coleman defines horror films through the lens of black representation through two lenses. “Blacks in Horror” include black actors in significant roles but their roles are stereotypical. ‘Black Horror’ meanwhile finds horror films shaped and created by black directors, writers, etc. to create thematic works that resonate with their audience. Examples of ‘Blacks in Horror’ include films such films where black people serve as the comic relief, the victim for the monster, or have black culture portrayed through a white audience’s eyes, often not well. ‘Black Horror’ includes films such as Blacula, Tales from the Hood, and Get Out. These distinctions are examined critically throughout the book with a wide variety of horror films featuring black people or made by a black audience are dissected in detail, with the lines between the genres often being blurred depending on the era.

Coleman defines each era of black horror by the decade, from the earliest silent films to the modern age, showcasing how black representation goes up and down via the decade. It is interesting to showcase how horror allowed black people representation and true power onscreen, despite being marginalized at the same time. Horror, as Coleman defines it, allows a sense of retribution and equalization that other films genres would not provide for a long time. In this sense, Blacula is defined in the book’s pages as a truly wall shattering piece of piece, dismissed by white audiences but embraced by a black audience, as a black vampire looms large onscreen.

 

The documentary based on Coleman's book, Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror
Image Via Indiewire

 

Horror Noire is a must read for fans of the documentary, as well as fans of horror and film history. Covering in-depth aspects of tons of ‘black horror’ films, from the mainstream to the cult to the exploitation, this book is heavily recommended and sheds new light on what has often been unfairly dismissed as a trash genre, showcasing how much horror has meant to generations of black audiences, in shades of good, bad, and the ugly.

 

 

Featured Image Via Horror News Network 

 

New Trailer For ‘Pet Sematary’ Released!

There are so many Stephen King books becoming movies in the next few years, and a new trailer has been released for one of his scariest stories.

Paramount Pictures has released a new trailer for the remake of Pet Sematary. Published in 1983, it tells the story of Dr. Louis Creed who relocates his family to Maine and lives near a pet cemetery that is near an ancient burial ground where pets come back to life. When one of his children dies, he buries them in the pet cemetery and things just get progressively worse from there.

Fans of the book will notice a big change between the book and the movie within this trailer. We won’t spoil it here but do you think you can find it?

Jason Clarke stars as Dr. Creed and John Lithgow plays his neighbor Jud. The film will have its world premiere at South By SouthWest on March 16th before being released on April 5th.

Watch the trailer here:

 

 

Featured Image Via ComingSoon.net

New Stephen King Book Cover Revealed!

A new Stephen King novel is always something to get excited about, and his latest one definitely sounds like a real page-turner.

King has revealed the cover of his new novel The Institute, which tells the story of a boy named Luke with special powers who is kidnapped and sent to a facility. As other children at the facility start to disappear, Luke must find a way to escape.

King has described the novel as a battle of “good vs. evil” with a story “as psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It

Announced in late January, the cover of the novel was revealed in an exclusive interview with Entertainment Weekly.

 

Image result for stephen king the institute

Image Via Entertainment Weekly

 

 

The book will be available September 10th.

 

Featured Image Via GeekTyrant