Category: Just for fun!

11 Hilarious Literature-Related Tweets

Monday gets a lot of hate, but Tuesday is arguably worse- you’re not even half way through the week, you still have a misery-hangover from Monday, it’s probably raining, you may have seen a dead rat on your way to work…any number of unpleasant things can have happened by Tuesday.

 

But never fear, for Bookstr is here with a compilation of hilarious literature-related tweets from the endlessly amusing inhabitants of Twitter dot com. So, let these tweeters bring a smile to your face as we edge ever closer to hump-day, and sure, by then it’s nearly the weekend!

 

Via Tenor

 

 

Featured Image Via Know Your Meme

'Choose Your Own Adventure'

‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ Interactive Experience Now Available With Alexa

As children, most of us loved ‘choose your own adventure’ stories—until our lives became one! These books were always as simple as they were complicated, encouraging readers to make choices that result in either positive or negative outcomes. Naturally, this is a lot more fun when these choices don’t result in real consequences (say, unemployment or just a bad haircut) and instead, force readers to start over from the beginning. The fun only ends when you work your way to the correct ending… and if your choices are as bad as mine, that could take any number of hours.

 

Choose Your Own Adventure originals

Image Via Medium

 

Since the original series ran between 1979 and 1998, these interactive sci-fi and murder mystery stories may not be as familiar to Gen-Z and the youngest Millennials. Still, the ‘choose your own adventure’ format resurfaces every few years with trending topics: Max Brallier released a zombie edition, Can You Survive the Zombie Apocalypse?, back when everyone thought zombies were about to be the next vampires. (In all fairness, they’re both dead. And neither would actually be that sexy.) Humor writer Dana Schwartz, the brains behind the Guy In Your MFA parody Twitter account, also used this format for her recent memoir, Choose Your Own Disaster. And, of course, Black Mirror‘s ‘Bandersnatch‘ episode is a recent example.

Good news: ‘choose your own adventure’ is about to be everywhere—and not just in the existential sense.

 

'Choose Your Own Misery'

choose your own misery is a choose your own adventure series for adults, featuring the limitless horrors of dating and the office
Image Via thrift books

 

Amazon Alexa recently introduced a new feature through Audible: Choose Your Own Adventure. The Amazon and Audible partnership uses Audible’s voice actors and Amazon’s accessibility to walk readers through two classic adventures (The Abominable Snowman and Journey Under the Sea) from the comfort of their own homes. Together, the books come with sixty-five possible endings to distract you for hours from all the choices your real life is waiting for you to make.

To start your adventure, just tell your Alexa-enabled device, “Alexa, open Choose Your Own Adventure from Audible!”

 

Featured Image Via The Mary SUe

 

 

A Homeless Man’s Coloring Book Pages Show Us Another Side of Creativity

A lesson for children and adults alike.

Healing, like creativity, is a process; there is no on/off switch. It flows like a river, sporadically obstructed by nature and chance. Shit happens—emotionally, spiritually, physically, we get hurt and we turn to various outlets to heal. People exercise, meditate, cleanse, float in some sort of sensory reduction tank (because apparently, that’s a thing), and others create. Regarding books, I do not mean to exclude the reader from this act of creation. There’s a well-known quote by Samuel Johnson circling our illustrious world wide web that says: “A writer only begins a book. A reader finishes it.”

 

Look at that face, that’s a solid blue steel.
Image Via Wikipedia

 

The reader fills in all the blanks—I know this because of all the literary theory classes those college people made me take…Reading allows the human mind to escape the limitations our so-called realities place upon it. Creating is the same. In the moment, your creation feels like all that matters. But it’s still about more than just you.

A local news station in Cleveland recently did a piece on a homeless man who enjoys drawing as a means to cope with his own limitations. Eugene Sopher draws pages for a coloring book that, due to Sopher’s precarious financial situation, may never be published. To Sopher, that doesn’t matter.

 

 

“I do this drawing, and it’s medicine, baby,” said Sopher. “I’m in the zone. Not trying to mix it with drugs, but it’s the best high I’ve ever had.”

 

His lack of finances and exposure have led to some unconventional PR methods: he relies on strangers to make copies for him so that he may share is art with the world. The wide variety of pages he has created contain lessons for young and old alike. Some of his pictures warn about the dangers of gang violence or meeting strangers online, and others aim to simply put a smile on your face. Sopher, who suffers from depression and bipolar disorder, has not had an easy life. He has felt the weight of the world and the resulting discombobulation. At forty-four years young, he spends a good amount of time drawing uncolored pages so that he can escape any personal grimness and help his readers.

 

 

 

“I can do something because if they’re reading that, they can say, ‘You know what? That happened to me. Oh, you what know, I went through that,” said Sopher. “A lot of the reason I keep my cartoons in black and white is it gives you a chance to put color to them.”

 

Sopher’s story and art remind us that creativity is not some sort of commodity purchased in the restricted section of society. It’s not exclusively available to those deemed ‘intellectual.’ It’s part of all of us, a silver lining that bridges the gap between reality and perception, body and soul. Regardless of one’s age, race, or gender—whether it be the lawyer who journals in her free time or the homeless man who lives to doodle—we are all connected by imagination and our ability to create.

 

 

 

Images Via News5cleveland.com

5 Times Library-Loving Cats Made the News

Everybody knows the Venn diagram of people who like reading and people who like cats is damn near a circle, but what about cats who like reading? Yep, seems people are pretty into them, too. Here are five instances of particularly persistent book-loving felines whose love of libraries made the news:

 

1. Max

 

Image Via The Washington Post

 

Max made the news back in 2017 with his relentless attempts to gain entry to his local library, despite the protests of his owners and staff. He was so persistent that the library was forced to put up a sign discouraging patrons from allowing Max into the library with them, explaining that it was in nobody’s best interest, least of all his own, for him to be in there.

 

2.  Browser

 

Image Via The Guardian

 

Browser the cat’s eviction from his library of choice sparked ‘international outcry’ when it made headlines in 2016. Thousands of people around the world expressed their support for the cat who resided, and still resides, at the library in White Settlement, Texas. After the local council decided to evict Browser on the basis that his presence prevented some members of the community from utilizing the library, other library patrons objected. The Guardian reports that at a local meeting regarding Browser’s fate, “a woman spoke about the history of cats in libraries. A man mentioned WebMD statistics on the low prevalence of cat allergies. Others talked about how the cat brought children into the library to read. A little boy was sad he had only been able to pet the cat once.”

Luckily for the town’s beloved Browser, the decision was overturned and he was allowed to remain at the library.

 

3. Dewey

 

Image Via iheartcats.com

 

Dewey, full name: Dewey Readmore Books, was deposited in the returns slot of a library in Spencer, Iowa when he was a kitten. Dewey captured the hearts of the librarians and became the library’s very own cat, even inspiring his own book,  Dewey: the Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched The WorldNo YOU’RE crying.

 

4. Mu

 

Image Via Maynooth University

 

Mu is Ireland’s Maynooth University’s library cat, who very kindly provided an interview with a student journalist for the Maynooth University Times this past October. During the interview, Mu provided many insights into his life, including: “I have resided here for many a year, and, by many a year, I mean I do not understand the concept of time.”

 

5. Penny

 

Image Via Jezebel

 

Penny is another library cat whose proposed eviction sparked objection. Jezebel reports that she had lived at Massachusetts’ Swansea Public Library for nine years before her presence was raised as an issue due to concerns over allergies. A petition in favor of Penny on Change.org garnered over 1,800 signatures.

Patrick Higgins, the man behind the campaign to have Penny removed, was gobsmacked by public support for her, and, in response, gave one of the most ‘I’m the baddie in a children’s film wherein the cat is the hero’ statements of all time: “We’ve got pictures of the cat on Facebook laying on top of a laptop, and they think this is okay!” quoth Higgins, presumably slamming his fist on an oak desk. “I just don’t understand it. The cat has gone all over the world. You’ve got the petition with over 2,000 people over a freaking cat.” And what, Higgins?

Unfortunately, Penny passed away in 2014, but lived in her beloved library until her final days.

 

 

Featured Image Via The Today Show

This Library Lets You Go on Blind Dates With Books

The phrase “Never judge a book by its cover” is pretty common, but people quite literally still do it when checking out books, but this new game at Roanoke County Public Library will make you think a little differently!

To play, all you have to do is grab a book from a special little table in the library. All of these books are wrapped up in special wrapping paper. The only information that you are given is a small little blurb on the front that describes the genre that you are reading. You aren’t allowed to unwrap the book until after you check it out.

Billed as a “blind date”, the library then gives you a sheet to fill out once you return the book titled ‘Rate Your Date’. You can answer questions based on how your “date” went, whether or not it was a “good match” as well as rate your date with a number of hearts.

This new game arrives just in time for Valentine’s Day, so if you’re looking for something intimate this holiday, there’s nothing more heartwarming than a good book.

You can read the full article here.

 

 

Featured Image Via AARP