Category: Fiction

The Best Visual Novel Out There

Visual novels are a strange breed. They’re a blend of books, movies, and video games all in one. They’re interactive narratives that, with the correct storytelling and writing, can prove to be immersive, incredible stories. They originated in Japan, but have made a niche for themselves throughout Europe and the United States. They are mainly produced for video game consoles, predominantly the Nintendo DS, but since then have had releases on computer systems, and iOS and Android devices.

 

 

Since they are a bit of a puzzling genre, where should you start?

 

 

Image Via Gfycat

 

If you have either iPhone or Android devices, I would highly recommend starting with the Ace Attorney series. You play as an emerging defense attorney, taking on the defense of falsely accused clients who have been charged for murder. But behind these murders, however, are complex storylines that are not afraid to take massive plot twists and leave you astounded. Before trials, you investigate the scene of the crime as well as other locations related to murder at hand, and interrogate characters with unique personalities and collect evidence. During the trial phase, you find the truth by cross-examining witnesses and finding contradictions between the testimonies and the evidence they have collected. The cases all last a maximum of three days, with the judge determining the outcome based on evidence presented by the defense attorney and the prosecutor.

 

Image Via MobyGames

 

It is heavily text based, so if you appreciate good writing you’ll fit right at home with Ace Attorney. The character development is superb and the way the plot flows is satisfying and entertaining. Also, you get to cross examine a parrot, so if that doesn’t sell I don’t think anything will. If you’re looking for something new and eccentric to check out, definitely give it a try, you won’t be disappointed.

 

Image Via Kiwi Farms

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Know Your Meme

Five Book Opinions from Cats

We all have some hot book takes, and what’s better than a good take? A hot take from a cat. Sure, they’re funny, but they’re also relateable. Well, some of them. Hopefully not #3. Any opinion from a cat is a quality opinion, and here are a few about your favorite books.

 

 

1. When you love nothing

Image via Planet eBooks

 

I hope you like more than two things, but if you’re gonna keep the list short, books are certainly top pics. Kind of makes you wonder which tow, doesn’t it? Relatable when all you want is to jump into fiction to escape your real world problems. Rest in peace, Tardar Sauce.

 

 

2. We’re still not over it

Image via I Can Has Cheeseburger

 

MASTER gave Dobby a SOCK. Seen here, a tabby kitten cosplaying her favorite Harry Potter character. Her ears might not be big enough, but 13/10 for effort, and she’s certainly mastered the huge eyes. Does Dobby ever bite the sock? Time for a reread. RIP Dobby. Yikes.

 

 

3. Don’t touch my things

Image via Book Bub

 

I know the ring makes you really protective, but do you get the sense Smeagle had siblings? “Mom said it’s my turn on the one ring!” – Smeagle, probably. Regardless, he’s attached, and this cat has captured his covetous energy perfectly.

 

 

4. Finely aged memes

Image via Book Bub

 

Sure, this meme format is basically antique, but memes age like fine wine. Besides, it’s hard to argue. I was an Aslan stan as a child, and can say that this is a good impersonation, if the scale might make it less convincing in person. I definitely want to pat the fluff.

 

 

5. Misleading book titles

Image via Book Bub

 

Finally it seemed like there was some literature he could really appreciate, so imagine the disappointment of getting two thirds through the book, and realizing it’s never going to be about bird hunting. Top ten anime betrayals of all time.

 

 

 

Featured image via Melanie Rockett

Top Picks-Five YA That’ll Broaden Your Horizons!

Each week, Bookstr will be looking at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your ever growing TBR pile.

Today, we are looking at some of the most sought after Young Adult novels that will pull you into their world and broaden your horizons.

 

 

5-Wilder Girls by Rory Power

 

Rory Power

Image Via Penguin Random House

 

Crime fiction editor Rory Power’s debut novel is part gripping-post-apocalyptic-romance, part-high-octane-thriller, and all heart that you should definitely check out.

 

Wilder Girls

Image Via Amazon

 

We are transported to the world of Hetty where she lives in Raxter School for Girls, trapped there thanks to a horrific plague that put the world in disarray. But when Byatt goes missing, Hetty will have to break quarantine an brave the horrors that lie beyond the fence…

Kirkus Reviews call it “a staggering gut punch of a book,” Young Folks pleads “I’m desperate for more”, and we here at Bookstr hope that Powers writes another novel that’s even half-as-good as this July 9th release.

 

4-Vow of Thieves by Mary E Pearson

 

Mary E Pearson

Image Via Goodreads

A masterclass in Young Adult Fiction, Mary E Pearson’s A Room on Lorelei Street won the 2006 Golden Kite Award for fiction. Her book The Adoration of Jenna Fox was a finalist for the Andre Norton Award, and her newest release has shocked and awed old and new readers alike. A sequel to Dance of Thieves (which is set in the same world as The Remnant Chronicles), Vow of Thieves was released this past August 6th and it should be in everyone’s hands.

 

Vow of Thieves (Dance of Thieves Book 2)

Image Via Amazon

 

Elite soldier and skilled thief Kazi and Jase Ballenger are madly in love and it seems to be happily-ever-after since the end of the last book, but we still got a whole book to go. Outside threats are a sure thing, but betrayals run deep and deadly when someone in their circle traps them in a web of deceit…

Those who love hard-won victories and dark fantasy will love this novel, especially if they thirst for buckets of blood. In the words of Kirkus Reviews, this August 6th release is “[a] smashing, satisfying adventure”

 

 

3-Hello Girls by Brittany Cavallaro and Emily Henry

Brittany Cavallaro and Emily Henry

Britanny Cavallaro (top) and Emily Henry (bottom)/ Image Via The Nerd Daily

 

Brittany Cavallaro has written A Study in Charlotte, A Question of Holmes, The Case for Jamie, and many more. Joining her is Emily Henry who has written When the Sky Fell on Splendor, The Love That Split the World, and A Million Junes.

 

Hello Girls

Image Via Amazon

 

Together, they bring us Hello Girls.

On one hand we have Winona whose perfect father isn’t perfect at all. The short of it, he locks the pantry door to control her eating habits and beats her behind closed doors. On the other hand, we have Lucille whose is barely getting by thanks to her thankless job as a waitress and her emotionally unstable mother and drug-dealing brother.

When Winona and Lucille meet, they realize that when graduation comes they need to get out of here as quickly as possibly.

They steal a convertible and go on a road trip from their small Michigan town to Chicago, running away from their old life and entering a new one where the only person they can depend on is each other.

Kirkus Reviews says the book “provides a fun, fast-paced plot with resourceful feminist protagonists,” and that’s basically all you need to know from this August 6th release

 

2-Frankly in Love by David Yoon

 

David Yoon

Image Via Entertainment Weekly

 

This might be his debut novel, but David Yoon has already made a lot of headway.

 

YA's Next Superstar

Image Via Davidyoon.com

 

He’s the Illustrator of Everything, Everything, and his book has already got Entertainment Weekly calling him “YA’s Next Superstar” (which he notes as “a little dramatic to say the least“), and Kirkus Reivews calls his novel “deeply moving account of love in its many forms”.

Okay, but what’s this book about?

 

Frankly in Love

Image Via Amazon

 

Frank Li is a Korean American, born and raised in Southern California. His life seems to be going well when he meets the girl of his dreams: Brit Means. They get along and love each other, but his parents want him to find a Korean girl and Brit, well, she’s white

So Frank teams up with Joy Song, a family friend whose in a familiar bind. Together, they come up with a plan to keep their parents off their backs while they stay with the people they love.

But things don’t always work out the way you plan.

Want to check it out? A lot of people will when it releases this September 10th!

 

1-Slay by BriTTNEy Morris

Brittany Morris

Image Via Publisher’s Weekly

 

After seeing Black Panther in the theaters, “I left the theater a Wakandian queen,” Brittney Morris explained. Same thing the second time she saw it. Following that high, it took her eleven days to write this sure-to-be bestseller Slay.

 

SLAY

Image Via Amazon

 

At school, seventeen-year-old Kiera Johnson is an honors student, a math tutor, and one of the only Black kids at Jefferson Academy.

At home, Kiera joins hundreds of thousands of Black gamers who duel in the worldwide role-playing game SLAY.

When a teen is Kansas City is murdered over a dispute in SLAY, news outlets blame the video game, labeling it as racist, exclusion, and a violent hubs for thugs and criminals. Some even threaten to the developer for “anti-white discrimination”.

No one knows it, not even her closest friends, but Kiera is, in fact, the developer.

Kirkus Reviews claims that “[g]amers and black activists alike will be ready to SLAY all day” and we here at Bookstr promise that this book will be the next best thing when it reaches a bookshelf near you this September 24th.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon

Six Iconic Shakespeare Memes

Shakespeare’s plays are whackier and whackier the more you read. Confusion, dirty jokes, and some pretty unbelievable things happening at sea. So many things are just begging to be memed. It’s a shame memes weren’t even invented until four hundred years after his death. At least we can give his works the meming they deserve retroactively.

Image via Pintrest

 

What an icon. Shakespeare invented countless words, including the word countless. But let’s get to plot nonsense.

I confess, my love of hamlet shows a little here, but who can blame me? There’s a reason it’s so widely read. Plus, Hamlet himself is such an incredibly quotable character, who wouldn’t make a meme? Like his most famous line.

Image via Dorkly

 

But it’s not just the things he says when he’s alone and feeling emo. Hamlet comes face to face with almost everyone in the play, in a way that changes it around him, even when he’s not staging mini murder plays.

Image via Citizen Sociolinguistics

 

I think we can all agree Ophelia deserved better. Who does he think he is, a prince? He-hem. Usually tossing a girl around a room (in some adaptations) is not the way to her heart. But you know what’s actually a worse seduction tactic?

Image via Dorkly

 

Yikes. That’s one way to get her alone. Not one I can condone, though. Alright, enough about Denmark. We could go on like this forever.

Let’s talk about history. No, it’s not the picture of an impaled bottle of Caesar salad dressing, as iconic as that is. It’s not the only Julius Caesar meme.

Image via SparkNotes

 

What happens when you kill the one fun friend? Then again, I guess all getting together to stab someone could be considered a party of sorts. It’s certainly one way to bond with your coworkers. Work outing? Tried it and I CANNOT recommend.

Image via Pintrest

I had to include a Much Ado About Nothing meme, because it’s my all time fave, and this is my favorite adaptation. Plus, just about every character is an absolute meme, start to finish.

 

 

Featured image via Shakespeare Teacher

8 of Michelle Obama’s Must-Reads

Book lovers and Obama supporters alike wait with anticipation every year to hear Barrack Obama’s book picks for that summer. Fortunately, you now have another round of books to choose from thanks to Michelle who has a few book recommendations of her own. Despite your ever-growing to-be-read pile, when Michelle Obama tells you to read a certain book, you listen!

Following the release of her own memoir, Becoming, Michelle reveals eight more must-reads in her “By the Book” interview, published on December 6, 2018 in the New York Times. Other titles come from an interview with Jenna Bush Hager and a memorial posted on Instagram for what would have been a Holocaust victim’s ninetieth birthday.

 

 

8-Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon

Image Via Image via The Stanford Daily

 

Part of the reason why Morrison received the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature, Song of Solomon follows the life of Michigan native, Macon through his life as he searches for a sense of identity.

 

7-The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Image via Penguin Books Australia

 

Before the major motion picture, Rachel was just a girl who liked to ride the train everyday to London and back. It’s definitely not because the train passes her ex-husband’s house or the because she can see the perfect couple she envies so who live a few houses down. Definitely not.

 

 

6-White Teeth by Zadie Smith

White Teeth

Image Via Image via Book Riot

 

Smith’s London-centric novel follows two friends, one Bangladeshi and one Englishman, as they navigate family, friendship and life in the city.

 

5-Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

Image via Apple Books

 

The archetype for unreliable narrators, Gone Girl will have you guessing until the very last page. Follow Nick and her husband Amy who disappears, but why…and how…and where?

 

4-An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage

Image Via Image via Oneworld Publications

 

Jones’ novel follows newlyweds who separate after a daunting rape trial. When they reunite later in life, things somehow get even more complicated.

 

 

3-Educated by Tara Westover

Educated

Image via Booktopia

 

Westover’s biographical memoir tells the story of how she fell in love with learning after growing up with little to none of it at all.

 

2-The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank

The Diary of Anne Frank

Image Via Image via Book Depository

 

Frank’s diary which she kept as a young girl before her family was sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust relay the horrors of the terrible tragedy.

 

1-Commonwealth by Anne Patchett

Commonwealth

Image Via Inprint

 

Patchett’s bestseller tells the story of a family whose dynamic gets turned upside down at a family christening and what happens when that child grows up and decides to share that story.

 

 

Featured Image via AARP