Category: Literary Fiction

Booze & Books(tr): Toasting the Anniversary of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’

This week, we celebrate the 59th publication anniversary of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, the treasured American classic that tackles racial injustice and intolerance.

 

Image via Amazon

 

The story has many moments to celebrate, many of which include the heroic Atticus Finch, who instantly became an American icon. Whether you’re re-reading the classic novel, checking out the graphic novel edition, or watching the beloved 1962 film adaptation starring Gregory Peck, here are some of Atticus Finch’s best moments to toast with your favorite drink.

 

Toast and drink when Atticus says:

 

 

1. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”

 

2. “The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.”

 

3. “…Before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.”

 

4. “Are you proud of yourself tonight that you have insulted a total stranger whose circumstances you know nothing about?”

 

5. “This time we aren’t fighting the Yankees, we’re fighting our friends. But remember this, no matter how bitter things get, they’re still our friends and this is still our home.”

 

6. “You just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don’t you let ‘em get your goat. Try fighting with your head for a change.”

 

7. “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do.”

 

8. “Our courts have their faults as does any human institution, but in this country our courts are the great levelers, and in our courts all men are created equal.” 

 

 

 

Featured Image via Legacy

 

Longlist for World’s Richest Short Story Prize Announced

‘Richest’ here does not mean substantial content of the short stories — although each of these eighteen stories undoubtedly has that too. ‘Richest’ here literally means the most money. The winner of this award will receive £30,000 ($38,074.95), which is the largest amount offered in any English language short story prize contest. 

The prize in question is for The Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award. It is open to any writer who has been published in Ireland or the UK. The story must be under 6,000 words. The longlist has just been announced and the eighteen writers include both well known names and less familiar up and coming writers. 

 

Emma Cline and The Girls

 

The more well known names include A.M. Homes and Emma Cline. Homes, the author of over ten books, is nominated for her story, “The National Caged Bird Show.” Cline, the author of the bestselling novel The Girls, is nominated for her story, “What Can You Do With a General.” 

 

The full list:

Kathleen Alcott, “Natural Light”

Kevin Barry, “The Coast of Leitrim”

Emma Cline, “What You Can Do With a General”

Paul Dalla Rosa, “Comme”

Joe Dunthorne, “All the Poems Contained within Will Means Everything to Everyone”

Wendy Erskine, “Inakeen”

A.M. Homes, “The National Caged Bird Show” 

Caoillin Hughes, “Prime”

Louise Kennedy, “In Silhouette”

Toby Litt, “Impatience” 

Danielle McLaughlin, “A Partial List of the Saved”

Gerad Mckeague, “Wet Bloody Country”

Alecia McKenzie, “Trees”

Paddy O’Reilly, “All the Languages”

Nicholas Petty, “It is Summer at Camp Pomodoro”

Brian Van Reet, “Lazarus”

Kevin Wilson “Biology”

Constance Wu

Constance Wu to Star in ‘Goodbye, Vitamin’ Adaptation

Universal Pictures has just optioned the rights to Rachel Khong’s Goodbye, Vitamin. Set to join the project as lead actress and executive producer is Crazy Rich Asians and Fresh Off the Boat star Constance Wu.

 

Khong’s book captures the story of Ruth, a single woman who moves back in with her father ailing of Alzheimer’s. The story is a tragicomedy, where most of what would be the melodramatic points are lost due to her father’s memory loss. Ruth and her mother, with no cure to rely on, begin feeding him dried jellyfish supplements and vitamin pills in hopes of some help. It’s quirky, it’s weird, and it is absolutely brilliant! The book won a series of awards, including the California Book Award for First Fiction.

 

Goodbye, Vitamin cover image and Rachel Khong

image via paperback paris

Dylan Clark will produce with his Universal production company, Dylan Clark Productions, and Jennifer Yee McDevitt is set to do the adaptation.

featured image via los angeles times
Cover image of 'Speak'

Hachette Children’s Group Snags Rights to ‘Speak’ Graphic Novel

When Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson was published in 1999, it immediately spoke to thousands of teenage girls. Finally, something was capturing an all too common threat across high schools and colleges: sexual assault. The powerful story that has sparked conversations across high schools is now getting a powerful reboot in graphic novel form thanks to Hachette Children’s Group.

Kate Agar has acquired the UK and Commonwealth rights to Speak: The Graphic Novel from Macmillan, who published the work with illustrations by Emily Carroll, in the United States earlier this year. The story that took high schools and colleges by storm only stands to be more powerful in graphic novel form. The book is set to release in August 2019 along with a new edition of the classic novel, which Hachette Children’s Group also published since the 1999 release.

 

'Speak: The Graphic Novel' cover image
Image Via Bookish

After being attacked at a party just before starting high school, Melinda accidentally busts the party by calling the police. No one at the party knows why she called the police, and she immediately becomes an object of public scorn. Her best friends turn on her, leaving her alone to deal with the fallout. Through out the story, Melinda doesn’t speak. She can’t articulate to anyone why she called the police, and even when she does make new friends they also turn on her.

Because of Melinda’s inability to speak up, the story is extremely powerful. It isn’t about survivors or victims refusing to tell their stories, it is about no one being there to listen. What’s powerful about this story in graphic novel form is that there is no descriptive text to surround the dialogue. Melinda’s silence becomes harder to ignore as a reader, adding a level of depth to an already heartbreaking story.

In an interview with The Bookseller, Agar explained why it was so important for them to acquire the graphic novel:

As soon as I saw Emily Carroll’s masterful adaptation, I knew that we had to have this graphic novel edition sitting alongside Laurie Halse Anderson’s classic on our list. Sadly, the story at the heart of Speak remains as relevant and pertinent as it was 20 years ago, and the graphic novelisation is an amazing format in which to tell it.

Anderson has agreed with Agar, stating that she is glad it will be Hachette to publish the graphic novel. She adds that Speak can help communities, schools, and people in general learn how to deal with these situations and speak up!

 

Laurie Halse Anderson and 'Shout' Cover Image

image via whyy

Also published this year, was Laurie Halse Anderson’s book of poetry, Shout. In response to nothing changing among the way we handle survivors’ stories in the media, especially with allegations towards those in high seated positions, Anderson once again picked up the pen to express her rage.

featured image via the mary sue