Category: Classics

Celebrate Black History Month with books!

Celebrate Black History Month With These 10 Powerful Novels

It’s the first day of Black History Month, and what better way could there be to celebrate the black community’s rich artistic legacy than with these ten iconic novels? These outstanding works of literature represent the diverse experiences of the black community, collectively featuring black authors and characters of varied genders, sexual orientations, nationalities, and mixed racial identities. If your favorite book isn’t on the list… be glad to have an extra recommendation! Truthfully, there are too many powerful books to list, and the collection below represents only the smallest fraction of the black community’s enormous cultural achievements. So read on! Whether classic or contemporary, these ten books represent some of the world’s greatest works of literature.

Beloved by Toni Morrison

 

'Beloved' by Toni Morrison

 

Staring unflinchingly into the abyss of slavery, this spellbinding novel transforms history into a story as powerful as Exodus and as intimate as a lullaby.

Sethe was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. Her new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved.

Filled with bitter poetry and suspense as taut as a rope, Beloved is a towering achievement by Nobel Prize laureate Toni Morrison.

 

GIovanni’s Room by James Baldwin

 

'Giovanni's Room' by James Baldwin

 

Baldwin’s haunting and controversial second novel is his most sustained treatment of sexuality, and a classic of gay literature. In a 1950s Paris swarming with expatriates and characterized by dangerous liaisons and hidden violence, an American finds himself unable to repress his impulses, despite his determination to live the conventional life he envisions for himself. After meeting and proposing to a young woman, he falls into a lengthy affair with an Italian bartender and is confounded and tortured by his sexual identity as he oscillates between the two.

Examining the mystery of love and passion in an intensely imagined narrative, Baldwin creates a moving and complex story of death and desire that is revelatory in its insight.

 

Their Eyes were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

 

'Their Eyes Were Watching God' by Zora Neale Hurston

 

Fair and long-legged, independent and articulate, Janie Crawford sets out to be her own person — no mean feat for a black woman in the ’30s. Janie’s quest for identity takes her through three marriages and into a journey back to her roots.

One of the most important and enduring books of the twentieth century, Their Eyes Were Watching God brings to life a Southern love story with the wit and pathos found only in the writing of Zora Neale Hurston. Out of print for almost thirty years—due largely to initial audiences’ rejection of its strong black female protagonist—Hurston’s classic has since its 1978 reissue become perhaps the most widely read and highly acclaimed novel in the canon of African-American literature.

 

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

 

'Things Fall Apart' by Chinua Achebe

 

Things Fall Apart tells two overlapping, intertwining stories, both of which center around Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first of these stories traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world in which he lives, and in its classical purity of line and economical beauty it provides us with a powerful fable about the immemorial conflict between the individual and society.

The second story, which is as modern as the first is ancient, and which elevates the book to a tragic plane, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo’s world through the arrival of aggressive, proselytizing European missionaries. These twin dramas are perfectly harmonized, and they are modulated by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul. Things Fall Apart is the most illuminating and permanent monument we have to the modern African experience as seen from within.

 

The Underground Railroad by Colson whitehead

 

'The Underground Railroad' by Colson Whitehead

 

Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hellish for all the slaves but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood—where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned and, though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor—engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven—but the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. Even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

 

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

 

'The Color Purple' by Alice Walker

 

The Color Purple is a classic. With over a million copies sold in the UK alone, it is hailed as one of the all-time ‘greats’ of literature, inspiring generations of readers.

Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls ‘father’, she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker – a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

 

wHITE tEETH by Zadie Smith

 

'White Teeth' by Zadie Smith

 

At the center of this invigorating novel are two unlikely friends, Archie Jones and Samad Iqbal. Hapless veterans of World War II, Archie and Samad and their families become agents of England’s irrevocable transformation. A second marriage to Clara Bowden, a beautiful, albeit tooth-challenged, Jamaican half his age, quite literally gives Archie a second lease on life, and produces Irie, a knowing child whose personality doesn’t quite match her name (Jamaican for “no problem”). Samad’s late-in-life arranged marriage (he had to wait for his bride to be born), produces twin sons whose separate paths confound Iqbal’s every effort to direct them, and a renewed, if selective, submission to his Islamic faith.

Set against London’s racial and cultural tapestry, venturing across the former empire and into the past as it barrels toward the future, White Teeth revels in the ecstatic hodgepodge of modern life, flirting with disaster, confounding expectations, and embracing the comedy of daily existence.

 

Invisible man by Ralph Ellison

 

Ralph Ellison's 'Invisible Man'

 

First published in 1952 and immediately hailed as a masterpiece, Invisible Man is one of those rare novels that have changed the shape of American literature. For not only does Ralph Ellison’s nightmare journey across the racial divide tell unparalleled truths about the nature of bigotry and its effects on the minds of both victims and perpetrators, it gives us an entirely new model of what a novel can be.

As he journeys from the Deep South to the streets and basements of Harlem, from a horrifying “battle royal” where black men are reduced to fighting animals, to a Communist rally where they are elevated to the status of trophies, Ralph Ellison’s nameless protagonist ushers readers into a parallel universe that throws our own into harsh and even hilarious relief. Suspenseful and sardonic, narrated in a voice that takes in the symphonic range of the American language, black and white, Invisible Man is one of the most audacious and dazzling novels of our century.

 

SIng, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

 

Sing Unburied Sing

 

Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award–winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America.

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager.

When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another thirteen-year-old boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love.

Not Without Laughter by Langston Hughes

 

'Not Without Laughter' by Langston Hughes

 

Although best known as a poet and pioneer of the Harlem Renaissance movement, Langston Hughes proves himself one of modern literature’s most revered and versatile African-American authors with Not Without Laughter, a powerful classic novel.

This is a moving portrait of African-American family life in 1930s Kansas, following young Sandy Rogers as he comes of age. Sandy’s mother, Annjee, works as a housekeeper for a rich white family, while his father, traverses the country in search of work.

Not Without Laughter is a moving examination of growing up in a racially divided society. A rich and important work, Hughes deftly echoes the black American experience with this novel.

 

All In-text Images Via Amazon
Featured Image Via Toledo Parent
Gone with the Wind

Iconic ‘Gone with the Wind’ Returns for a 2-Day Theatrical Run!

Movieweb reports that the Golden Age of Hollywood classic, Gone with the Wind, will be returning to theaters in celebration of its 80th anniversary.

The recipient of ten Academy Awards (two of which were honorary) and earner of an inflation-adjusted $1.8 billion has garnered fans and acclaim for decades. Even before its release, the adaptation of the Pulitzer-Prize winning novel was one of the most anticipated movies of its time, especially with the production’s extensive “search for Scarlett.” Talent scout Katharine Brown searched the East Coast for an unknown actress and eventually cast Scarlett O’Hara to fill the role.

 

Gone with the Wind

Image via Amazon

 

Gone With the Wind explores the depth of human passions with intensity as Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled, manipulative daughter of a wealthy plantation owner, comes of age just in time to see the Civil War forever change her way of life and marriage.

The legendary film will be shown for two days on February 28th and March 3rd thanks to Warner Bros. and Fathom Events.

 

 

 

Featured Image via MovieWeb

Dr. Seuss' most beloved children's characters

Next Time You Hate Your Writing, Remember: Dr. Seuss Almost Burned His First Book

Most writers second-guess the quality of their work, whether these doubts are frequent or limited to insomnia-causing late night angst sessions. Fewer writers guess that those on the bestseller list have these same fears. This week, a letter from a young Theodore Geisel—a.k.a. Dr. Seuss—is available at auction for $3,500. Like Geisel's books, the letter tells a fascinating yet unbelievable story: a vulnerable, personal account of an aspiring author who nearly burned his first children's manuscript.

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Michael J Seidlinger Posts Humorous Kafka Writing Routine on Twitter

Filipino-American author, Michael J Seidlinger, is known for his novels My Pet Serial KillerThe Laughter of Strangers, and The Fun We’ve Had. He recently posted on Twitter to remind us all of renowned author and cultural icon Franz Kafka and his tumultuous writing routine, recorded in Kafka’s own diary. Followers and Seidlinger have had substantial fun with Kafka’s methods for creativity.

 

 

 

The aforementioned Twitter thread

 

Image Via Twitter

 

The Twitter thread, continued

 

Image Via Twitter

 

 

Would you follow this writing routine?

 

Featured Image Via Timesofisrael.com

Illinois High School Debuts Literary Murals for English Department

Students at Mundelein High School returned to class after winter break to find that their halls decked out with some pretty interesting artwork.

 

The Illinois school debuted new literary themed murals for the school’s English department, with each mural based on a book that is treasured by the teachers who work in that department.

 

The six books are All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely, Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, Beartown: A Novel by Fredrik Backman, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, and October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard by Leslea Newman.

 

Since the school reopened on Tuesday, the murals have gone viral and have received a highly positive response online. Speaking to the Daily Herald, the school’s spokesperson Ron Girard said he is hopeful that more murals will be added soon.

 

“This project is a great way to motivate students to read more and to begin conversations about their reading, even in the hallways.”

 

Here are some photos of the murals:

 

Images Via BBC

 

Images Via BBC

 

If this doesn’t motivate the students to read more, then I don’t know what will.

 

 

Featured Image Via Legat Architects