Category: Fiction

Kristofer Hivju Says an Alternate ‘GoT’ Ending Exists

According to CNN, Kristofer Hivju claims that an alternate ending to the legendary, infamous, and notorious series finale of Game of Thrones exists.

“We shot an alternative ending,” the Hivju said at the British Film Institute in London. “That was mostly for fun, but I don’t know if I’m allowed to tell you about that.”

 

 

Like legions of fans, Hivju explains that he was surprised by how the series ended.

“The funny thing is after Season 7, I had my theories, fans had theirs’, everybody, the cast had their theories, so there were thousands of theories,” he continued. “To choose one path would be difficult to say but there were many things I didn’t see coming; there was the element of surprise, which I liked.”

An HBO representative was contacted about the claim, but suggested Hivju might have been joking.

Either way, fans may never find the closure they’re looking for. #ReleasetheSnydercut. I mean GOTcut…

 

 

Featured Image via CNN

 


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Bookstr’s Three to Read This Week 11/21/19

Thanksgiving is coming up. We’ll have license to feast, families will resume internal feuds, the Goku balloon will make its return to Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade (Dragonball Z still counts as a book too). Anyway, there’s plenty of stuff and stuffing to be thankful for, including these new book releases!

Check out Bookstr’s Three to Read, the three books we’ve picked for you to read this week!

 

Our Hot Pick

Little Legends: Exceptional Men in Black History

 

 

Synopsis:

An important book for readers of all ages, this beautifully illustrated and engagingly written volume brings to life true stories of black men in history.
Among these biographies, readers will find aviators and artists, politicians and pop stars, athletes and activists. The exceptional men featured include artist Aaron Douglas, civil rights leader John Lewis, dancer Alvin Ailey, filmmaker Oscar Micheaux, musician Prince, photographer Gordon Parks, tennis champion Arthur Ashe, and writer James Baldwin.
The legends in this book span centuries and continents, but what they have in common is that each one has blazed a trail for generations to come.

 

Why?

New York Times bestselling author-illustrator Vashti Harrison returns with her latest addition to the hit Little nonfiction series. Harrison provides an enlightening crash course on some of history’s most iconic figures and unsung heroes that may have been previously overlooked. Their achievements span across all fields of study and professions you can think of, and surely will inspire future icons in the making.

 

 

Our Coffee Shop Read

Ronin Island Vol. 1

 

 

Synopsis:

After a mysterious attack devastates a great swath of 19th century Japan, Korea, and China, survivors from all three lands find refuge on a hidden island and build a new society. Hana, the orphaned daughter of Korean farmers, and Kenichi, son of a great samurai leader, have little in common except for a mutual disdain for the other. But these young warriors will have to work together when an army invades the island with shocking news: the Shogun has returned and the Island is expected to pay fealty in exchange for protection from a new threat…a mutated horde that threatens to wipe out all humanity.

Written by bestselling author Greg Pak (Mech Cadet Yu, Star Wars) and beautifully illustrated by Giannis Milonogiannis (Old City Blues, Prophet), Ronin Island explores an idealistic coming-of-age story against the backdrop of a morally grey time of war where the reasons for fighting are questioned at every turn.

 

Why?

Comics superstar Greg Pak has written epic contributions to the superhero genre before, but is now taking on an ambitious reinterpretation of history with some mythic flare. It’s Seven Samurai meets monster-invasion-apocalypse—brought to life with the art of Giannis Milonogiannis. Pull a Samurai Jack and travel to another land and time from the seat of your local coffee spot (he went to the future, but you get the idea).

 

 

Our Dark Horse

The Bromance Book Club

 

 

Synopsis:

The first rule of book club:
You don’t talk about book club.

Nashville Legends second baseman Gavin Scott’s marriage is in major league trouble. He’s recently discovered a humiliating secret: his wife Thea has always faked the Big O. When he loses his cool at the revelation, it’s the final straw on their already strained relationship. Thea asks for a divorce, and Gavin realizes he’s let his pride and fear get the better of him.

Welcome to the Bromance Book Club.

Distraught and desperate, Gavin finds help from an unlikely source: a secret romance book club made up of Nashville’s top alpha men. With the help of their current read, a steamy Regency titled Courting the Countess, the guys coach Gavin on saving his marriage. But it’ll take a lot more than flowery words and grand gestures for this hapless Romeo to find his inner hero and win back the trust of his wife.

 

Why?

It seems as though men have feelings too, and they show it when and where you least expect it. Some guys hype you up for a touchdown, other guys hype you up to save your marriage. With heart and humor, author Lyssa Kay Adams captures one of life’s many beautiful and nourishing occurrences that is the bromance—the loving companionship between dudes that lifts them up, and genuinely makes their lives better. If you can’t get enough, Booklist promises that, “Readers will look forward to more books in the Bromance Book Club series after this promising start.”

 

 

All In-text Images Via Amazon.

 


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Sarah Dessen Apologizes to Grad Student for Twitter Outrage

Sarah Dessen is well known for her Young Adult contemporary novels. This past summer she released her fourteenth novel, The Rest of the StoryAll of her novels focus on a teen girl, so of course her key demographic is teen girls, but apparently Northern State University found her novels compelling enough to add to their “Common Read”, which is a book the entire university is asked to read. One of the students attending the school at the time decided to voice her opinion, in which she stated according to Newsweek, that Dessen is great for teens but is not up to the level of Common Read, so she worked closely with the program to stop them from choosing one of her books.

 

Image via Sorrywatch

 

 

Dessen then took it upon herself to post a screenshot of the comment, which then led to fans and authors rallying to her side. Authors such as Jodi Picoult, Angie Thomas, Jenny Han, Roxane Gay and many more.

 

Image via Trendmap

 

Then a couple days later, Dessen decided to apologize for the twitter outrage she caused and the attack on the student that made the comment.

 

 

Image via Notheydidnt

 

Other authors followed suit and even the school tweeted an apology. The girl however had to deactivate her social media accounts due to backlash from fans for her comment, which was made in 2016. She now studies languages with a focus on cyber harassment. According to her, she is using her experience as a guide to help her understand how language is used to express many different perspectives.

 

 

Featured image via Newsobserver

 

 


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These Four Poets Had the Oddest Jobs and You’ll Never Guess What They Were

Famous poets. We only know them for their enchanting verse. Many late great poets didn’t start out writing in verse, or if they did, they had to do something else to support that habit, as they didn’t come from money or fame. Enter some really odd jobs you wouldn’t otherwise expect of young bards.

 

4-Maya Angelou

 

image via amazon

 

Before Maya Angelou wrote I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings or won the Presidential Medal of Freedom, she found a job as a San Francisco streetcar conductor. In fact, she sat every day for two weeks in the office enduring racial slurs from the secretaries until the hiring manager finally yielded and gave her the position. She became the first black streetcar conductor in San Francisco. What’s more, she was only sixteen-years-old!

 

3-Robert Frost

 

image via amazon

 

Robert Frost, who wrote the infamous poem, The Road Not Taken, had a very dangerous job in his twenties called light trimming where he stood over active machinery on a wobbly ladder undoing arc lamps from the ceiling in order to repair them. Fortunately, he kept writing and his poetry gained so much notoriety he didn’t have to go back to light trimming ever again.

 

2- Langston Hughes

image via amazon

 

Langston Hughes was a very musical poet closely associated with jazz and the Harlem Renaissance. One of his most well-known books is Montage of a Dream Deferred. But before any of his work gained attention he was a student at Columbia University and held jobs such as busboy, cook, launderer, and even a seaman. Being a seaman inspired one of his poems, “Death of an Old Seaman Cecil Cohen.” It proves not all manual labor is meaningless if it leads to great art.

 

1- T.S. Eliot

 

image via amazon

 

Last but not least, T.S. Eliot, famous for his incredibly depressing 20th-century oeuvre, “The Waste Land.” He rocked a bowler hat for his odd job, which was not so odd but actually a nine to five clerk position at a bank called Lloyd’s in London. He even got two-weeks-a-year vacation time just like every other working stiff employed there. Not much to say about this sad man except, cool hat.

 

 

Poets get a reputation for being odd considering a lot of them, well, are. Some of them make their own jam, some are recluses, some are too obscure in their writing, meaning they are purposefully trying to be misunderstood. This group of poets, however, were pretty candid in their work as they wanted to be understood. They received high praise, too. Robert Frost was the 1958 Poet Laureate and won more than several Pulitzer Prizes, Langston Hughes won a Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, Maya Angelou earned more than 30 honorary degrees, and T.S. Eliot won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. Consider checking their work out and remember, they’re speaking from experience. Even if it was odd.

 

 

Featured Image Via HollyWood Reporter

 

 


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5 Reasons You Should Read the ‘Witcher’ Books Before the Show Drops

This highly anticipated Netflix series has been a hot topic in recent months. Whether that anticipation comes from the series being lauded as “The next Game of Thrones by critics, or because it is being met with frustration due to the apparent differences between the television series and the video games, both the Netflix adaptation and the games are the result of Andrzej Sapkowski’s highly acclaimed eight-book series.

The series follows the adventures of Geralt of Rivia, a man who was subjected to various mutations as a child and, because of this, he can fight creatures that normal humans wouldn’t stand a chance against. Through the Law of Surprise, Geralt adopts his ward Ciri, a young princess with prolific powers. While Geralt is content to remain neutral in the face of great political upheaval, he must become a part of that conflict to see that order is restored to the world.

In the past, the books were adapted into a 90s Polish film and television series that were not met with favorable reviews, so this most recent series not only has the video game fans to contend with, but it also has the previous series’ shortcomings added on for increased pressure.

So why not sit down to watch this series with an idea of what to expect?

 

 

1. The netflix series is an adaptation of the book series

What some game fans don’t realize is that the games take place after the book series. While some of the events, like the Battle of Sodden, are mentioned in the games, you don’t really get a feel for what happened if you haven’t read the books. Triss’s account of what took place at that one battle in Blood of Elves is positively gut-wrenching. The books also help you have a deeper understanding of the turmoil that exists between and in countries like Temeria, Novigrad, and Cintra.

Though there will likely be homages sprinkled throughout the series for the video game fans (I personally hope so), the Netflix series is, at its core, an adaptation of the books. If you’re anything like me, you probably like to read the stories before sitting down to watch the movie or show. Not to say that I’m that one friend who sits there and says “Well, they changed that from the books,” but I most definitely am.

The fact that the Netflix series is a book adaptation does seem to be throwing a few fans for a loop, as Yennefer’s appearance is never remarked upon in the game series, so it has become the cause of some confusion. The books, on the other hand, does explain why Yennefer looks this way.

 

Image via Glamour Fame

 

Regardless, if a person watches the series having already read the books, they’ll probably have a better idea of why certain decisions were made by the team that created this series.

 

2. This series does resemble ‘a game of thrones’ in style and tone

 

Going off of what critics have said, yes, the Witcher does possess certain qualities that were prized in George R.R. Martin’s series A Song of Ice and Fire. There are multiple points of view to follow, so when you need a breather from following Geralt around in the narrative, you can read Ciri’s point of view. The same grittiness and violence that you observed in Martin’s work is also present in Sapkowski’s books. The looming threat of war is also present in the Witcher books as well, and you get to witness how it all begins and how it all falls apart (I would suggest starting with Blood of Elves if the movers and shakers facilitating a war behind the scenes interests you).

 

 

3. the political situation in the world is a lot easier to follow

image via pinterest

 

Although the television series hasn’t dropped, one of the faults in the game series was that the political stage of the Witcher universe was very hard to follow and often unclear. Which makes sense, because the political situation was dense and complicated and, if not given the space and breadth to be explained, it definitely felt like walking into an exam unprepared. However, a game has the ability to explore a world in a much more in-depth way than a television series can, so this is a concern that does hold water.

An example of this would be the Scoia’tael, a group of predominantly elvish rebels who regularly commit acts of violence against humans. While the game briefly touches upon their motives and what they ultimately wish to accomplish, it only provides a glimpse at the problem. The books, however, go into great detail about the political and social climate that the non-human races endure, and so the motives of these characters become a lot more transparent.

As mentioned previously, the turmoil between and in countries like Novigrad, Temeria, and Cintra is also expanded upon in the books. If anything, the books go to great lengths to ensure that the readers understands exactly why the royalty and the sorcerer’s lodge commit the acts that they do. So if there is any possibility that the television series will struggle along the same vein as the video games, the books will do an excellent job filling in the blanks.

 

4. We still don’t know how faithful the adaptation will be

For all we know, the Netflix series may remain extremely faithful to Sapkowski’s literary vision, but the fact remains that this is still an adaptation. One of the big reasons that I go into most movie premiers having already read the book is because I want to judge the adaptation by the creative decisions that were made. I want to know what the book was like, and then I want to see what changes were made. Were those changes justified? Why? Do I (gasp) like the movie more than I like the story it was based off of? Or do I feel like adding in something else from the book might have helped? Ultimately, did the adaptation bring something new and interesting to the table?

I intend to watch this series with my hopes high, because I think that Sapkowski’s original books already presented a creative vision with an impressive breadth and magnitude to it, and I think that this adaptation has the potential to do the same. Hopefully this adaptation will provide enough steam for more fantasy books to be made into movies and television series.

 

 

5. The books are really interesting

At the end of the day, you should read a book because it intrigues you—and the Witcher books do exactly that. The references to Slavic folklore, the sword fights, and Geralt and Yennefer acting as parents to Ciri are elements that pulled me into the story and kept me reading. These books have multiple layers of political intrigue, interpersonal relationships, mythology, and did I mention sword fighting? The books, like a lot of fantasy literature, are also able to provide a social commentary through the interactions displayed between the inhabitants of the world.

If you would like to dip your toes into the Witcher universe and give it a shot, I would suggest starting with The Last Wisha short story collection that reveals how Geralt got the nickname ‘The Butcher of Blaviken,’ and how he and Yennefer first met.

 

Featured image via Cnn

 

Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please donate and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.

 


Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please donate and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.