Category: Education

Three Ways to Craft a Poem If You’re out of Ideas

Go to Poets & Writers and check out their writing prompts. They have innumerable resources for getting started on writing.

 

3-Try Making a “Found Poem”

 

image via amazon

 

Try what’s called a ‘Found Poem.’ A Found Poem takes existing texts and reorders them, whether it’s a sentence, several words, or several passages. You can take from one paragraph or an entire book; do as you wish. As an example, check out Ezra Pound’s, Cantos. He includes letters written by presidents and popes, as well as an array of official documents from governments and banks.

 

 

2-Try Making a STRUCTURED Poem

 

Sometimes structure and boundaries help creativity flourish— try a ghazal, a pantoum, or Jericho Brown’s invented form called the duplex. The ghazal and pantoum structure can be looked up at Poetry Foundation.

 

image via kickstarter.com

 

1-Try Making an erasure!

 

Erasures! Rip a page from a leftover magazine or book you no longer need, and slowly cross out words then string the leftover ones together and create a poem by, you got it, erasing words.

 

image via pinterest

 

If all else fails: 5-7-5.  Or 5-3-4. The syllabic structure of an American haiku is relative. Write three of those and you have a three-stanza poem!

 

 

 

Featured Image Via GoWaterside

 

 


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5 Wildlife Books Cooler Than National Geographic

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s picks are wildlife recommendations to immerse yourself in the natural world. Dig in!

 

5. Sleep: How nature gets its rest by Kate Prendergast 

 

 

Sleep: How Nature Gets Its Rest by Kate Prendergast is all about educating you on how animals of the world get their rest. Some animals sleep alone. Others sleep in packs. Some slumber at night, and others prefer the daytime for getting some z’s. Whether large or small, familiar or unusual, all animals must find a way to get some rest. Did you know that giraffes sleep standing up? That sloths sleep upside down? Or that fish sleep with their eyes open? Take a close look at the sleeping habits of meerkats, bats, horses, birds, and other animals around the world in a book for young nature enthusiasts that is certain to spark a sense of wonder.

 

4. the Breath of a whale by Leigh Calvez

 

 

The Breath Of a Whale by Leigh Calvez tells the story about the world’s most remarkable creatures: the whales. Leigh Calvez has spent a dozen years researching, observing, and probing the lives of the giants of the deep. Here, she relates the stories of nature’s most remarkable creatures, including the familial orcas in the waters of Washington State and British Columbia; the migratory humpbacks; the ancient, deep-diving blue whales, the largest animals on the planet. The lives of these whales are conveyed through the work of dedicated researchers who have spent decades tracking them along their secretive routes that extend for thousands of miles, gleaning their habits and sounds and distinguishing peculiarities. The author invites the reader onto a small research catamaran maneuvering among 100-foot long blue whales off the coast of California; or to join the task of monitoring patterns of humpback whale movements at the ocean surface: tail throw, flipper slap, fluke up, or blow. To experience whales is breathtaking.

 

3. being Caribou Karsten Heuer 

 

Being Caribou by Karsen Heuer conveys the magnificent world of caribou in an incredible journey, up close and personal. Determined to convey both the enormity of the caribous’ migration and the delicacy of their habitat, Karsten Heuer and his wife spent their honeymoon following the herd. For five months, they traveled an uncharted course on foot over mountains, through snow, and across frozen rivers, with only three semi-scheduled food drops for support. As with the caribou, Heuer and his wife faced dwindling fat reserves and stalking by ravenous grizzlies and wolves just awakened from hibernation. Both a rousing adventure story and a sober ecological meditation, Being Caribou vividly conveys this magnificent animal’s world.

 

2. Death at Sea World by David Kirby 

 

 

Death At SeaWorld by David Kirby centers on the battle with the multimillion-dollar marine park industry over the controversial and even lethal ramifications of keeping killer whales in captivity. Following the story of marine biologist and animal advocate at the Humane Society of the US, Naomi Rose, Kirby tells the gripping story of the two-decade fight against PR-savvy SeaWorld, which came to a head with the tragic death of trainer Dawn Brancheau in 2010. Death at SeaWorld introduces real people taking part in this debate, from former trainers turned animal rights activists to the men and women that champion SeaWorld and the captivity of whales. In section two the orcas act out. And as the story progresses and orca attacks on trainers become increasingly violent, the warnings of Naomi Rose and other scientists fall on deaf ears, only to be realized with the death of Dawn Brancheau. Finally he covers the media backlash, the eyewitnesses who come forward to challenge SeaWorld’s glossy image, and the groundbreaking OSHA case that challenges the very idea of keeping killer whales in captivity and may spell the end of having trainers in the water with the ocean’s top predators.

 

1. When the Whales Walked by Dougal Dixon

 

 

When the Whales Walked by Douglas Dixon is all about evolution! Since evolution has become a popular primary school topic in the UK, a fleet of books on the subject has hit the shelves. Most opt for the all-too-familiar tale of the intrepid Darwin aboard the HMS Beagle and finches in the Galápagos, or the peppered moths that would follow. Here, the authors opt for something else, offering 13 stories about the early experimentation of animal forms in a bid to help younger readers understand how we got here. Besides the eponymous whale, there are chapters on early dinosaur flight and warm-blooded crocodiles, alongside more familiar stories of snakes with legs and fish with feet.

All in-text images via Amazon

Featured Image Via Amazon

Four books stacked on top of each other (left side) beside an open book

Laugh out Loud with These 5 Insane Places to Read!

You can read anywhere. You can read in your house, on the bus, in a train, on a plane, you can read with the sunset behind you or with a sword fight in front of you.

 

Two people staring at each other through their respective books

Image Via NPR

 

But, using high tech sciencey things, we now know for sure, beyond any reasonable doubt, that these are the top five definite worst places to read.

 

5-In a burning building

 

Firefighters trying to put out a burning building

Image Via Practical Eschatology

 

The building is on fire. Well, time for a good book!

Don’t be that dude. The flames will destroy the pages and it’ll be too hot to properly read. You’ll get light headed. You will burn alive.

 

A book burning

Image Via The Guardian

 

And worst case, the book will burn into ash, and books shouldn’t be burned.

 

4-On Train Tracks

 

Don’t do this.

 

A POV shot of someone lying on traintracks

Image Via Time Magazine

 

There are two problems with this. For one, if you sit down normally then you could be sitting in a dark tunnel. Not good if you want to see what you’re reading without the assistance of a flashlight.

 

The subway arrives

Image Via Aliexpress

 

But let’s say the tunnel is lit up, like the picture above, or you’re outside, like the picture above that. Well, either way you’re sitting down on a terrain meant for a train that wasn’t meant for you to sit on. Sounds like your bum could be in a lot of pain. And if you lie down, that could hurt your spin. Not good.

ALSO A TRAIN COULD SMASH INTO YOUR FACE!

Picture this: You’re reading a good book. Completely engrossed. Eyes on the book, you don’t see that light coming for you at the end of the tunnel. But you hear it. You try to stand up, but you fall. It’s not so bad, you think, that could be something good. But here’s the thing…

 

Ben Affleck as Daredevil
Image Via Decider

“THAT’S NOT HEAVEN, THAT’S THE C TRAIN!”

And now instead of reading, you got hit by a train. Now that just sounds like a pain in the neck…

 

 

3-In the ocean

 

A person swimming (drowning?) in the ocean
Image Via Video Blocks

 

You’re underwater with a good book. Pacific ocean, let’s say? Yes, let’s say that.

The ocean is sparkling, glittering. Above you, colorful fish swim around you, dancing about like angels. You look down, but guess what? You can’t read. The water has washed the pages and smeared the ink.

 

Someone reaching above the surface of the water, straining to reach an unseen helping hand

Image Via Tony Evans

 

Now you have nothing to read while you drown. Life sucks sometimes, don’t it?

 

2-Space

 

Space

Image Via Wired

 

This seems romantic. Hurdling through the cosmos, a book in your hands, flying with the cosmos to the stars beyond the stars. Your eyes go to that first line and-

 

Even Starload nearly died in space...and he's half Celestial

Image Via Guardians of the Galaxy

 

You’re dead now. Wanna know why? Because you can’t breathe in space.

 

 

1-Skydiving

 

Skydiving

Image Via Skydive Mossel Bay

 

So you have your favorite book with you, but then a strange man in a red costume tells you to get ready. You put your trust bookmark in (don’t dogtail the page, you monster) and you put it at your side. There’s a parachute on your back. The plane opens up. You’re about to go skydiving.

With the wind whipping your face, you look below and see the ground. It looks like a painting. You take a breath and fall.

 

Skydiving

This is you, but you have a book in your hand  / Image Via Skydive Oz

 

As you tumble to the ground, you realize this might not ever happen again. You could die. Your blood is drumming through your veins. Your heart is going fast. With adrenaline pumping through you, you could just speed through the lines. When are you going to get another opportunity like this?

You open up your book and start to read. You’re reading fast, so fast, and you read both pages at breakneck speed. You flip the page, but you’re fighting against the wind. This is going to be harder than you think.

With all your might, you flip the page and readjust your hand, but the wind is too much. Not only is the wind literally shredding pages out of the book, but it feels like it could tear the skin off your hand.

The book flies out of your hand. That book cost a lot of money and you need to finish it before you give it back to mother earth. You look to where it’s gone, and you maneuver your body after it.

 

Skydiving

Image Via Fatherly

 

The light is harsh against your eyes. You squint, reaching out. But, Ghosh, what is that light? It’s yellow and it’s orange and it’s-!

 

A burning building, with leaping flames and billowing clouds of smoke.

Image Via Dissolve

 

A burning building. You can manage this. Reaching down, you grab the book. Yes, you have the book, and you will make this work. See that burning building? What a perfect place to read, you think, having not read this list.

 

Parachuting
Image Via BBC

You pull the parachute and gently glide into the burning building. But guess what?

 

A book burning

Image Via The Guardian

 

The book will burn into ash, and books shouldn’t be burned.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via INC


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Librarians Are Taking a Stand for Banned Book Week

It’s Banned Book Week and librarians are fighting back.  Last year over four-hundred-eighty books were banned, and a majority of the books had to do with the LGBTQ community. This year the books don’t even have to have an LGBTQ protagonist—just a single LGBTQ background character is reason enough for a book to be banned.

 

Image via Libguides

 

The target demographic for this week of banned books is, of course, children and teens. The top books on the list are Young Adult novels and children’s books. The number one book on the list is written by author Alex Gino, George which has a transgender character. Even the best selling book, The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas landed at number four due to readers being led to have negative views of the police.

 

 

This is why librarians are fighting back and encouraging readers to go on Twitter and be a part of Dear Banned Author Letter-Writing campaign. It gives a voice to young readers to advocate for their favorite banned books and fight against censorship.

Featured Image via Huffington Post