Category: Education

The Amazing Book Covers of Kavalier and Clay

It has been 20 years since Michael Chabon’s legendary novel was published on September 19th, 2000. In that short time, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay has won a Pulitzer Prize, and many many other awards.

The book follows two cousins, Joe Kavalier and Sam Clay, as they reunite when Joe comes to America to escape Nazi Europe. The pair combine their skills, Joe the artist, and Sam the writer, to navigate the newfound world of comic books. It follows their careers, and intertwined love lives: Sam struggles with his queerness in a time when it wasn’t accepted and Joe falls in love with a woman he can’t have. Chabon lets readers into a world that is torn by war and patches it with the love and creative connection that the two cousins share.

It is incredible that in only 20 years the book has become a modern American classic. But, what is more incredible is the number of book covers that it has gone through.

There is a quote in the book that reads, “Forget about what you are escaping from. Reserve your anxiety for what you are escaping to.” Here are the TAAOKAC book covers. There are so many of them and they are all amazing. They say not to judge a book by its cover, but hopefully, after seeing these, TAAOKAC will be something you want to reserve your anxiety for and escape into.

Happy 20th.

1. The first edition published by Random House in 2000

image via amazon

2. The 2001 paperback edition with Houdini on the cover

image via goodreads

3. the post-Pulitzer edition in august 2001

image via goodreads

4. The Italian Edition in 2001

image via goodreads

5. the Swedish edition in 2002

image via goodreads

6. the german edition in 2004

image via goodreads

7. the french edition in 2004

image via goodreads

8. the Chinese edition in 2012

image via goodreads

9. the rebranding of all Chabon books to look this way in 2012

image via goodreads

10. the polish edition in 2019

image via goodreads

11. the new paperback edition in 2012

image via goodreads

12. the gorgeous limited edition illustrated edition that costs $135

image via the folio society

 

featured image via empireonline.com

Dr. Seymour Schwartz, Author of ‘Principles of Surgery,’ Passes at Age 92

Dr. Seymour Schwartz, Distinguished Alumni Professor for the Department of Surgery at the University of Rochester and author of the Principles of Surgery, passed away last Friday at age 92 while at his son’s residence in St. Louis, Missouri.

Read more

5 Things Interning At A Literary Agency Taught Me

Interning at a literary agency was like being paid to eat candy all day. Except that I wasn’t paid and the books I read usually weren’t sweet. The internship entailed reading and reviewing manuscript submissions, working the front desk (aka awkwardly offering visitors coffee/tea and then just getting them water), and sending out mail.

Over the course of those four months, I read tons of books and it’s likely only one or two of them will ever make it to publication. It was a time of ‘business casual’ clothing and free Nespresso coffees that taught me a lot about how the publishing industry works.

1. No, the literary agency doesn’t publish books

The different facets of the publishing industry can be confusing because there are so many of them. There’s the publishing company, the editors, the lawyers, the agents, and more. The job of the agent is to get a book to publishers. Usually, agents have relationships with companies and they will take a client and their work to the company to get published. Jericho Writers reported that the odds of sale with an agent are around 67%. Chances are much lower if an author just cold submits their manuscript to a publishing company.

2. there’s a method to all the career madness

If you were wondering how someone manages to make it in the industry, there’s actually a system in place that allows you to rise up. After getting hired as an agent’s assistant, you can work under them learning for about two years, before starting to take on clients of your own. Another year or two after that, once you’ve established yourself with a couple of works, you can break away and become an agent. Generally, the agency that you’ve been working for will hire you, but you can take your clients elsewhere or start up your own agency as well. Over the years you will work your way up by gaining more clients and (hopefully) representing some bestsellers.

3. There really are a ton of white women

In my agency alone there were 9 that I was aware of. Granted, there were a bunch of male agents, but no male assistants and no males of color. But yes, the stereotype is alive and thriving.

4. it’s worth submitting a proposal before writing your manuscript

There’s nothing quite as disappointing as pouring hours into your work only to have it rejected. Agents will only accept clients that they can sell, otherwise they won’t make any money. They get paid only when their client does, and do not run on a set salary. So, before sitting down and throwing your whole life into an idea, send some proposals around to agencies first to see if someone will represent it. This will also force you into a deadline for your writing (which some of us NEED) and will allow for better feedback throughout the process.

5. submit your work with normal formatting

Times New Roman. 12pt. font. Double spaced. It’s so easy to do. No agent is going to be impressed if you decide to write in Courier Neue because you think it looks nicer. In fact, most won’t even read the manuscript if it isn’t formatted correctly. It’s worth just sticking to the standard so there will be nothing distracting your reader from the actual work.

feature image via masterclass.com