Category: Young Readers

Its National Redhead Day! Celebrate The Best Literary Redheads!

Its National Redhead Day, or as its more widely known National Love Your Red Hair Day, celebrates all of you out there with gorgeous locks of flaming hair. This celebration is made to make redheads feel confident and embrace their natural beauty, especially with the unique coloration they are blessed with. To celebrate in our own way, let’s count down some of the best redheads across the literature spectrum and see the abundance of them!

5. Ygritte: ‘A Song of ice and fire’

Image via Seven kingdoms of westeros

Ygritte hails from the gritty world of A Song of Ice and Firethe beloved of Jon Snow. A wildling who lives beyond the Wall, Ygritte is known as one who has been ‘kissed by fire’ and is considered lucky due to her red hair. She certainly lives up to that image, being a warrior who fights alongside the men and runs circles around Jon Snow whenever they’re onscreen together. Her red hair helps define her and certainly makes her stand out among her people.

 

4. Nancy Drew

Image via Wikipedia

Nancy Drew from her own series is an interesting one. While she was always a redhead, as seen the original cover art for her books, she was later rebranded as blonde! But redhead Nancy will always stick in the popular consciousness and being honest, she’s way cooler with red hair than blonde hair (no offense to you blondes out there!) But Nancy Drew is an iconic character, a spirited, adventurous, smart girl who solved mysteries and inspired dozens to follow in her footsteps. Her hair was the icing on the cake for this badass gal.

 

3. Tintin: ‘The adventures of Tintin’

Image via Tintin Wiki

Tintin, the titular hero of the famous Belgium comic The Adventures of Tintinmay not have exactly the best hairstyle to compliment his ginger colors (seriously, what is with that quiff?) but he more than makes up for it with his actions. He’s not a sidekick or a supporting character but the main hero and despite his small stature, he kicks all kinds of ass. Tintin has taken on smugglers, drug kingpins, Al Capone, assassins, pirates, and even supernatural creatures. Tintin may be a little bland personality wise, often be outshines by his supporting cast such as grumbling sea captain Haddock and bumbling professor Calculus. But his red hair makes him stand out and he’s always exciting readers with his next adventure!

 

2. Anne of Green Gables

image via Pininterest

Anne Shirley is a classic heroine. The star of her novel, Anne of Green Gablesno list would be complete without mentioning this spirited young girl. Having grown up in an orphanage and based from family to family, Anne’s life takes an upswing when she moves into Green Gables. Her hair is a focal point of her worries, as her childhood friend and future husband often mocks her by calling her ‘carrots’, to her chagrin. But it bothers her less as she grows older and becomes truly part of her. With no red hair, there would be no Anne Shirley.

 

1. The Weasleys:Harry Potter’

image via Harry Potter wiki

The Weasleys from Harry Potter are everyone’s favorite family. Molly Weasley is the ultimate mother, essentially adopting Harry as a bonus child while managing her very large brood of children. Ron is central to the series’s power trio, being Harry’s best friend, while his sister Ginny ultimately marries Harry at the end of the series. And there was no better identifying marker for the family than their trademark red hair, making them all instantly memorable from hair styles alone.

Happy National Redhead Day! Remember, love your hair and tell us who some of your favorite redheads in literature are!

Featured Image Via Pininterest 

November Netflix: 3 Books to Screen Adaptations Coming Out!

Its a new month so that means new movies and TV shows to stream on Netflix! Can you name them all?

 

 

1-The King

The King

Image via IMDB

 

Based on Henry V by William Shakespeare, this adaptations come November 1st! Timothee Chalamet will be portraying Henry V, and Robert Pattinson will be in it as well, playing the Dauphin.

 

2-Let it Snow

Let It Snow

Image via Wikipedia

 

Based on the John Green Novel of the same name, this adaptations arrives November 8th! The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina star, Kieran Shipka, will be in it. As well as Marvel star, Jacob Batalon.

 

3-Green Eggs and Ham

Green Eggs and Ham

Image via Geekytyrant

 

Based on the Children’s book by Dr. Seuss, this adaptation comes out November 8th! Familiar names, such as Tracy Morgan, Diane Keaton, Adam DeVine, and Keegan-Michael Key, from Key and Peele will be narrator.

 

 

Click Here for a full list of all new releases coming to Netflix

 

 

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I Am Excited About the YA National Book Award Finalists!

On Tuesday, October 8th, the finalists for the National Book Award in Young People’s Literature were announced! Here are the five books that are influencing the minds of our youth!

 

Pet by Akweake Emezi

 

Image Via Amazon

 

This story follows Jam, a transgender, selectively mute girl who lives in the fictional utopia of Lucille which claims itself to be post-bigotry and violence, and has supposedly eradicated all “monsters”. However, after Jam accidentally bleeds on her mother’s painting, the image of a horned creature with metallic feathers and metal claws comes to life, looking to defeat the human monster that threatens the home of Jam’s best friend, Redemption. Together, Jam, Redemption, and the creature—which they call Pet—set out to find the monster. Narrated by Jam in both voice and sign language, which is conveyed through italic text, Pet is a great read for fans of speculative horror!

Look Both Ways: A Tale Told in Ten Blocks by Jason Reynolds

 

Image Via Amazon

 

 

In this book, Reynolds tells ten relatable stories, all beginning after school ends, over ten blocks encompassing multiple schools. The stories follow an overlapping black cast experiencing life as it comes at them. The stories cover topics such as familial love, first crushes, near-death experiences, cancer, bullying, and so on. Combining reality and humor, Reynold’s Look Both Ways leaves a bittersweet feeling on the reader’s tongue. 

 

Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay

 

 

This novel follows high school senior Jay Reguero as he struggles to find out the truth about what happened to his cousin, get him the justice he deserves, as well as find his own identity as a Filipino-American. Navigating the secrets that his cousin kept and his guilt for losing touch, Jay comes of age in this story of a victim of the fictional President Duerte’s war on drugs.

 

Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All by Laura Ruby

 

 

This novel intertwines the stories of two young girls on the cusp of WWII in Chicago—Frankie Mazza, a fourteen-year-old artistic “half orphan”, and the narrator, the ghost of Pearl Brownlow who died when she wasn’t much older than Frankie. Throughout the novel, Pearl observes Frankie’s life and reflects on her own, coming to terms with the events that preceded and ultimately led to her death. The journeys of the two girls bring to light the tribulations that girls suffer through at the hands of the patriarchy and the importance of living to the fullest. 

1919: The Year That Changed America by Martin W. Sandler

 

 

Unlike the other finalists, Sandler’s book is a nonfiction outline of life-altering events that occurred in the year 1919 and how those events have shaped the present day. From Boston’s Great Molasses Flood, to Communist Red Scare, to the passage of the 19th Amendment and Prohibition, Sandler ties all these events and more to current events such as Black Lives Matter, women’s presence in business and the government, climate change, gun control, and so on. 1919 is a great resource that shows how big of an impact history has on the present day.     

Rainbow Rowell’s ‘Wayward Son’: A Hero, After the Fact

A year after Rainbow Rowell released her much beloved novel Carry On, the first book in the Simon Snow series, the second in the series, Wayward Son, has been published. Carry On received stellar reviews from audiences; some even claimed it to be comparable to the Harry Potter series. Last year, fans of the novel were left with a void in their hearts after finishing Carry On, but now that void, which can only be filled by more Simon and Baz interactions, can be filled… but not in the way audiences may expect. Rowell’s Wayward Son tells the story of what happens to the hero after the battle has been fought and the war has been won. What readers will learn is that there are always new battles to fight, and not everything ends in happily ever after.

 

 

*Spoilers Ahead*

 

At the end of Carry On, Simon sacrifices his magic in order to defeat the Insidious Humdrum—who turns out to be sort of a version of himself? I know kind of weird—Baz graduates from Watford at the top of his class, all thanks to Penelope who decided not to return for her last term at Watford; and Agatha runs off to California, attempting to get as far away from magic as she possibly can. Wayward Son fast forwards a year into the future. Simon and Penelope share an apartment in London. Baz and Penelope are both attending university, and Simon is doing relatively nothing. He sits on the couch day after day, needing Penelope to spell his wings and tail if he ever wants to wander the outside world. A complete one-eighty from how we left it, Baz and Simon’s relationship is beginning to suffer. Simon is always cranky, and Baz doesn’t know where they stand as a couple. It’s almost as if stripping the magic from Simon created someone completely different. This is when Penelope has her amazing idea to take a trip to America—something she and Simon had always talked about doing—and what starts out as an innocent idea to help cheer Simon up becomes an even bigger threat to their lives and the magical world.

 

Relationships and identity are major themes throughout this novel. All three main characters struggled with their identities for the duration of Wayward Son—Simon struggled with being stripped of his hero status, Baz contemplated his identity as a vampire, and Penelope attempted to find where she fits in a world outside of Watford. As these three characters struggled with their own identities, their relationships were tested, especially pertaining to Baz and Simon. Baz has felt estranged from Simon ever since they defeated the Humdrum and Simon lost his magic. They don’t do any of the things they did when their relationship first began, they don’t seem as close. Much of this had to do with Simon’s identity crisis. He was always the hero up to this point. Now it seems to him that he’s lost his purpose.

 

 

Rainbow Rowell did a fantastic job portraying hero after-the-fact in Wayward Son­. In most action-adventure novels, the story ends with the hero saving the day and living happily ever after. However, the audience seldom sees the hero after his or her job is done. In this novel, we see exactly that, and in Simon’s case, the future is fairly bleak as he struggles to find a new purpose in life and to convince himself that he is deserving of Baz. Similarly, with Penelope, although she has moved on and is attending university, she is struggling to figure out how she fits into the outside world. At Watford, she was the top of her class and able to fix anything with a snap of her fingers (literally and figuratively). However, as she discovers during their road trip across America, the real world doesn’t work like that. There are mages more powerful and experienced, and obstacles not introduced to her at Watford.

 

Although the book did very well in regard to its themes and its portrayal of a different side of the main character, I found that it moved a bit slower than its predecessor, Carry On. The story moves a lot like a road trip across America might move—long stretches of seeing relatively the same thing. The beginning of the book and the beginning of their trip is a lot of Penelope being cranky and hungry, and Baz being confused about where he and Simon stand. It wasn’t until Nebraska that the story really got going.

 

Another aspect of the novel that was lacking was a resolution between Simon and Baz. Now, I realize that not all stories have a happy ending, and certainly not all relationships do either. However, I would have liked to know which direction they were leaning toward: working it out or letting each other go. Adding this to the novel wouldn’t necessarily have made Wayward Son better or worse, but I would’ve enjoyed it. Although there was no definite consensus about Baz and Simon, Baz does bring up an insightful point that stuck—is Simon acting like the Simon he first started dating because he feels like the hero again? Or is this how it’s going to be even when he’s not being the hero?  As Simon, Baz, and Penelope encounter more obstacles and battles on their trip, Simon starts to cheer up and feel like himself again, most likely because he feels like he’s doing something important again and he has things to protect his loved ones from.

 

All in all, Wayward Son is a fantastic sequel to Carry On. It portrays feelings most all adolescents feel after graduating high school or the equivalent: lost and confused (but with more trees, sky, and magic).

 

 

K-Pop Star Jessica Jung to Release YA Book In 2020

Another musician is stepping into the literature world. Entertainment Weekly reported K-pop star Jessica Jung will be publishing her own book next year: Shine.

 

Image Via Billboard

 

Inspired by most of her own life, the book follows Korean-American Rachel Kim as she is recruited by a K-pop label and follows her training into becoming a successful artist, and her relationship with a K-pop legend.

Jung is a former member of the South Korean girl group, Girls’ Generation, before branching into other businesses like fashion and acting and eventually going into a solo music career. Her discography includes nine studio albums with Girls’ Generation and three EP’s as a solo artist. She was included in Forbes’ 30 under 30 Asia list in 2017’s most influential people.

 

 

This will be the first of a two-book deal that Jung has with publisher Simon & Schuster imprint, Simon Pulse. In addition to the book deal, Shine has already been commissioned for a live-action adaptation by the same team behind To All The Boys I Loved Before.

Jung expressed how excited she was to publish her own book in her EW interview:


“With Shine, I wanted to tell a big, fun, escapist story that also examines in-depth, behind- the-scenes aspects of the K-pop world. My goal was to tell a transparent, candid story — in a way that sometimes fiction does best.”

 

 

You can pre-order Shine today.

 

 

Featured Image Via Hype MY