‘The Woman in the Window’ Sparks Major Controversy

Dan Mallory’s thriller novel The Woman in the Window (written under pseudonym A.J. Finn) is headed to the big screen in May, spearheaded by English director Joe Wright. This won’t be Wright’s first rodeo when it comes to book adaptations; he is best known for his work directing Pride and Prejudice (2005), Atonement (2007)and Anna Karenina (2012)It is, however, the first to be met with severe criticism before even reaching the masses. Apparently, test audiences of the movie were left confused about the plot overall, forcing the crew into reshoots and a later release date than originally planned.

IMAGE VIA AMAZON

The film will star Amy Adams as Anna, an agoraphobic child psychologist who thinks she may have witnessed a violent crime while spying on her neighbors. If this plot sounds familiar, it’s probably because we’ve seen (and read) it countless times. “Unstable woman reports suspicious activity that no one believes due to her instability” has become something of a money-making formula (see: Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train, The Woman in Cabin 10). While we love that courageous female protagonists are having a moment, we’re not particularly in love with this trope.

Aside from the severely overdone narrative, much of the controversy surrounding the upcoming film centers around debuting author of the bestseller, Dan Mallory. You know the little white lies most of us tell to get into college or get out of a long day at work? Mallory has been accused of, and admitted to, lying about the death of his mom and brother and his own battle with brain cancer. This vaguely echoes the social-climbing John Early character who fakes cancer for a book deal in the hilarious TBS hit Search Party. Mallory, however, claims that his lies about physical health battles were to protect a very real struggle with mental illness. Whatever the case may be, Mallory’s overnight success remains impressive.

IMAGE VIA LA TIMES

Sometimes we just need to enjoy things for what they are, and with a star-studded cast and famed director, this is sure to be entertaining at the very least. If you’re a fan of female-lead thrillers, scoop up a copy of The Woman in the Window before you catch the film in May.

Featured image via Slash Film 


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