‘The Fault In Our Stars’ Director Josh Boone to Adapt Stephen King’s ‘The Stand’ for TV

  Two years ago, Josh Boone, who directed John Green tear-jerker The Fault In Our Stars, shelved what was rumored to be a four-film adaptation of Stephen King’s Revival. However, Consequence of Sound have reported that Boone is attached to direct a ten-hour series at CBS All Access based on King’s 1,200-page novel The Stand.    ABC produced a four-part miniseries in 1994, but as Consequence of Sound so rightly point out, “the material demands an adaptation that won’t be limited by the strictures of network television.”   In 2016, Boone said:   The movies based on King’s books that don’t work …

Adaptations
stephen king

 

Two years ago, Josh Boone, who directed John Green tear-jerker The Fault In Our Stars, shelved what was rumored to be a four-film adaptation of Stephen King’s Revival. However, Consequence of Sound have reported that Boone is attached to direct a ten-hour series at CBS All Access based on King’s 1,200-page novel The Stand

 

ABC produced a four-part miniseries in 1994, but as Consequence of Sound so rightly point out, “the material demands an adaptation that won’t be limited by the strictures of network television.”

 

In 2016, Boone said:

 

The movies based on King’s books that don’t work so well are the ones that don’t take the heart of the characters that beat in the books. I’m a huge John Carpenter fan, but on Christine, there’s an aching sadness and deep character development in the book that’s just not in that movie. What I’d like to do is Anthony Minghella-depth adaptations of King’s books, if that ambition makes sense.

 

According to Amazon, the plot of The Stand is as follows: 

 

When a man escapes from a biological testing facility, he sets in motion a deadly domino effect, spreading a mutated strain of the flu that will wipe out 99 percent of humanity within a few weeks. The survivors who remain are scared, bewildered, and in need of a leader. Two emerge–Mother Abagail, the benevolent 108-year-old woman who urges them to build a community in Boulder, Colorado; and Randall Flagg, the nefarious “Dark Man,” who delights in chaos and violence.

 

 

Featured Image Via Rolling Stone: Illustration by Roberto Parada