‘Strange Planet’ Webcomic Lands a Book Deal

Any devoted fan of Nathan W. Pyle’s viral webcomic series Strange Planet will probably agree — these eye-candy toons are laugh-out-loud funny, and just one is never enough. Entertainment Weekly announced today that HarperCollins Publishers will publish a book based on the Strange Planet series by creator Nathan W. Pyle in the fall. In the book, readers will find comics they know and love well in addition to never-before-seen content.       Pyle made it big with a simple idea. In the world of Strange Planet, colorful aliens comfort and support one another while making extremely simplified allusions to their surroundings. One of the most …

Book Culture Debut Authors Just For Fun Young Readers

Any devoted fan of Nathan W. Pyle’s viral webcomic series Strange Planet will probably agree — these eye-candy toons are laugh-out-loud funny, and just one is never enough.

Entertainment Weekly announced today that HarperCollins Publishers will publish a book based on the Strange Planet series by creator Nathan W. Pyle in the fall. In the book, readers will find comics they know and love well in addition to never-before-seen content.

 

 

 

Pyle made it big with a simple idea. In the world of Strange Planet, colorful aliens comfort and support one another while making extremely simplified allusions to their surroundings. One of the most well known comics depicts two blue alien creatures against a bright pink background; one of the creatures is obviously crying. In an effort to console the other, one alien requests a “mutual limb enclosure.” Even more upset now, the crying alien says “You are absorbing my face fluids.” The other alien is again unfazed: “Let me absorb, let me absorb,” it says.

Even if Pyle’s personal and religious beliefs have earned him criticism from fans and the media, his comics certainly resonate. (Pyle recently found himself in hot water on Twitter when fans discovered his support of the March for Life movement.) But he insists his own beliefs do not interfere with the art he creates. Pyle has a massive following online — more than two million followers on Instagram alone — and his doodles were recently featured on the LinkNYC kiosks in Manhattan which are large, interactive, LED-lit boards intended to welcome tourists to the city and provide additional resources for city residents.

 

 

 

Despite the writer/artist’s sometimes controversial private life, however, his online renown can only hint at the response his book is due to receive.

For more information on Pyle, click here. You can pre-order your copy here.