Read to Write: Prompt Books

Writer’s block is probably the worst thing to happen to any writer. You’re sitting there, stuck and grasping for straws. What’s wrong? Why can’t you write? Where did all your ideas go? I can’t say for sure what the answers to these questions are, but I know one guaranteed solution: prompts. Prompts allow writers to create without having to come up with the more difficult plot points and storylines. There are two books in particular that do this is amazing and unique ways. The first is Naming the World edited by Bret Anthony Johnson. The book is a collection of …

Book Culture Debut Authors On Writing

Writer’s block is probably the worst thing to happen to any writer. You’re sitting there, stuck and grasping for straws. What’s wrong? Why can’t you write? Where did all your ideas go? I can’t say for sure what the answers to these questions are, but I know one guaranteed solution: prompts.

Prompts allow writers to create without having to come up with the more difficult plot points and storylines. There are two books in particular that do this is amazing and unique ways. The first is Naming the World edited by Bret Anthony Johnson. The book is a collection of prompts and exercises geared towards the creative writer. The entire piece is broken down into sections that focus on big ideas like Plot and Narrative and Descriptive Language, each filled with prompts that get your creative juices flowing. Each exercise is unique and a great way to try something new.

 

 

Image via Amazon

The revised and expanded version of Jeff Vandermeer’s Wonderbook is also something to behold. Unlike Naming the World, Vandermeer’s book is a guide to quality writing. Most of the text is a mix of Vandermeer’s insightful suggestions as well as nested essays from other writers. However, it is the images in Wonderbook that make it so special. Almost every page of Vandermeer’s book has an image on it, meant to fuel your mind in a way the text can’t. Every picture is its own prompt, daring you to make something new from it. And if visual prompts aren’t your thing, Vandermeer gifts his readers with a “Writing Challenge” in every chapter.

 

 

Images via ABRAMS Books.

Both these books have done wonders for my writer’s block, going as far as fueling entirely new stories. Prompts are a truly wonderful thing for a writer to use; a book of them is a godsend.

 

Featured Image via Swipe File

 


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