Off Broadway Production of ‘Three Sisters’ Cast

Anton Chekhov’s play, Three Sisters, is coming to Broadway. The play was originally written in 1900, and it centers on a conflict between illusions and reality, as well as three sisters who aren’t capable of changing their lives, but instead are squandering them in a provincial town. The very first performance of the play took place at the Moscow Art Theater and it is considered one of Chekhov’s best plays. Now, it is being adapted into an off Broadway production by Sam Gold, who will be the director. Clare Barron will be writing the screenplay.

Image result for the three sisters chekhov book cover

Image via Amazon

The actresses who will be portraying the sisters are Quincy Tyler Bernstine, who will be playing Olga, Irina will be played by Lola Kirke, and Greta Gerwig will be portraying Masha. Bernstine is an Obie Award winner, Kirke was in the hit movie based on the novel of the same name, Gone Girl, and Gerwig was just nominated for an Oscar for directing the (Oscar nominated) movie, Little Women. Gerwig isn’t only the award winner on the cast. Oscar Issac, of Star Wars fame, won a Golden Globe, and Steve Buscemi is a Golden Globe and Emmy award winner. Issac will be playing Vershinin, and Buscemi will be portraying Chebutykin.

 

Tony award winner Tony Ramos will be doing the costume design, and Andrew Liberman will be doing the set design, along with Brett J. Banakis. They, with others, will help bring this play to life once again. This will be the third reimagining of this play, and previews for it will begin on May 13, which is ahead of original date of June 1. It will run until July 12. Be sure to get tickets before then!

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Featured Image via The Economist