New App Helps You Get Through Those Long Classics

This week sees the release of a brand new app devoted to bringing you the classics. In a world where spare moments and leisure time seem few and far between, us readers welcome technology that helps us fit in as much reading as possible. The app is called Serial, and it works like this: You download a classic book (nothing contemporary!) through the app, which then prescribes you one twenty minute section of the book a day. Serial tells you exactly how many days it will take to finish. After just a few daily commutes and pre-bedtime reading sessions, you’re …

Literary Fiction
WRBG

This week sees the release of a brand new app devoted to bringing you the classics. In a world where spare moments and leisure time seem few and far between, us readers welcome technology that helps us fit in as much reading as possible.

The app is called Serial, and it works like this: You download a classic book (nothing contemporary!) through the app, which then prescribes you one twenty minute section of the book a day. Serial tells you exactly how many days it will take to finish. After just a few daily commutes and pre-bedtime reading sessions, you’re finished! That’s the main selling point: no matter how lengthy the book, and how many days the app predicts it will take, you are only ever reading twenty minutes a day. No more, no less. It’s a bit like a mental workout plan, for people whose attention is stretched thin between work and the multitude of screens vying for our attention.


Image courtesy of Itunes

Naysayers will likely lament the diminished attention spans of millennials, and take this app as further proof of our unwillingness to pick up a good ol’ fashioned book [TREES]. In reality, it’s no surprise readers these days have a hard time trudging through these dense works at marathon speed; a lot of them weren’t meant to be read that way in the first place!

 Many classics offered by the app were originally serialized in the literary magazines of their time. The general public of yore kept up with Charles Dickens, Crime and Punishment, Anna Karenina, and many other classics, just like modern folk keep up with their favorite TV shows: in segments.


 

                                                       Image courtesy of Itunes 

If anyone is disinclined to jump on the trend, it will most likely be those book lovers who think the look, smell, and feel of book cannot be beat. I’d be inclined to agree with them, but if more people are reading because of technology, then I don’t mind the two working side by side.

Featured image courtesy of Life Hacker