Netflix’s ‘Tall Girl’ Falls Short. Watch ‘Life As A Zuccini’

Tall Girl is the newest teen “dramedy” on Netflix. It was released to less than stellar reviews. There are many complaints about the movie but the biggest is that being 6ft 1 isn’t the end of the world.   Image Via Netflix The main character of the movie, Jodi, is a junior in high school and towers over everyone. She is very insecure about her height, her dad is weirdly obsessed with figuring out how to to stop her from growing and she is into the hot exchange student who is with the mean girl.  There is a lot to …

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Tall Girl is the newest teen “dramedy” on Netflix. It was released to less than stellar reviews. There are many complaints about the movie but the biggest is that being 6ft 1 isn’t the end of the world.

 

Image Via Netflix

The main character of the movie, Jodi, is a junior in high school and towers over everyone. She is very insecure about her height, her dad is weirdly obsessed with figuring out how to to stop her from growing and she is into the hot exchange student who is with the mean girl. 

There is a lot to unpack there but my review of this movie is literally, Jodi you are just tall. Of course, someone being tall can be a point of insecurity and she gets constantly bullied by her classmates which in no way helps her self-esteem. But the movie tries to convey this message in such a clunky way that it seems completely unbelievable. 

Jodi conventionally attractive, rich, and talented. But she acts like her being a normal height of a little over 6ft is oppressive. Looking at the criticism for this movie, people are upset because people are dying and starving while Jodi acts self-centered rather than being grateful for what she has. It’s not her fault, she’s a character written this way. She has friends, one of whom is love with her, both of her parents in her life, a sister and the only thing “wrong” is that she’s a tall girl. 

 

 

While My Life as a Zucchini or Ma Vie de Courgette is on the same platform it does an amazing job at showcasing worse situations and how they are overcome. My Life as a Zucchini is a french animated film which follows a nine-year old boy, Icare who likes to be called Courgette because his mom always did. He gets sent to live in an orphanage with other kids and his life is genuinely worse then Jodi’s but he doesn’t complain about his situation. It takes him some time to adjust but he gets used to his new life. And figures out how to make the most of it. 

 

Image Via Rotten Tomatoes

Again, Jodi is a junior, in reality, if there was a 6ft 1 girl in your school, you would notice for maybe freshman year but then you go about your business. The way the filmmaker presented this seems so unrealistic. Did none of her classmates have anything better to do, then ask ‘How’s the weather up there?’ for three years? And the exaggerated shots they take and how they leave so much room above her head tries to trick us into thinking that she is taller than she actually is. Like she’s actually a giant If these were only done from her perspective to show how she sees people and not how other people see her the point would’ve been driven home better. 

Instead of trying to date the hot guy who is also tall by the way, the story should’ve been about Jodi working on Jodi. Oh and for some reason, Stig, the hot foreign guy in question, is literally the only other tall person in the entire school. Are we supposed to believe that there isn’t a basketball team? Even in the well off-school, she attends?  

 

 

And at the end, Jodi pulls a Mean Girls and speaks on stage at homecoming about how she accepts herself and how no one should be ashamed for being different. These are great lessons and in a better movie it could have worked but Jodi doesn’t earn this ending.  She practically stumbles through the plot because quirky girls and girls who are so different from other girls get plot armor and barely learn anything, then she comes to this life-changing realization much to the surprise of the audience because of plot. It was unearned and shallow. I don’t mean to hate on this movie but it had some good bones and it could have been better. 

On the complete opposite side of the spectrum, we watch as Courgette grows. He meets the other children, his caretakers, teacher and even gets bullied by one of the boys in the home. But he learns how to stand up for himself and has some genuine character development, unlike Ms. thirteen men’s Nikes.

I won’t spoil these movies but I highly suggest that you check them out if you want to see what I mean. I can’t give a more glowing review of  My Life as a Zucchini. I watched it over the weekend, not knowing what it was and I was pleasantly surprised.  And I think you guys will be too. It’s a beautiful movie so get your tissues ready. But if you want to read before you watch, the original book written by Gilles Paris , Autobiographie d’une Courgette is on amazon for you to buy. 

 

 

Featured Images Via What’s On Netflix and Flixwatch