Netflix on an Adaptation Roll with 50 Projects in the Works

Netflix is quickly becoming the hot-spot for book adaptation.

Publishers Weekly’s recent article covered all the ins and outs of Netflix’s process of acquiring literary adaptation rights. It’s a very interesting read, from Netflix’s relationship with book publishers like Simon & Schuster, to their persistent appearance at book fairs around the world.

Overall, the streaming service is pouring a lot of care and hard work into their adaptation projects, with roughly fifty adaptation projects underway at the moment.

Netflix’s adapted series have been a huge part of their booming success, from  Orange Is The New Black to 13 Reasons Why, adaptations are what has helped Neflix to become the 180-million-subscriber entertainment giant it is today.

 

 

 

Outside of adapted TV series, Netflix is also creating feature length films, including Button Man by John WagnerI’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain ReidPashmina by Nidhi Chanani, and The Willoughbys by Lois Lowry.

 

 

 

Specific author’s work are being focused on as well.

 

American thriller novelist and Executive Producer for Netflix Harlan Coben is one such author. Coben’s novel The Stranger is the first of many of his works to be filmed.

 

Harlan Coben

Image via Harlan Coben Bio

 

…developing 14 of his projects into series and features for Netflix’s global subscriber base. The streaming company is sharing Coben’s material with global producers to get new perspectives on his work, exploring adaptations that could be made around the world.

 

 

Roald Dahl‘s children’s books are another series of stories that Netflix has in its sights.

 

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Image via Animation Magazine

According to Publishers Weekly:

In November, the company announced plans for a “slate of premium animated event series and specials” based on a long list of Roald Dahl books. That series of adaptations was the result of a joint agreement with the Roald Dahl Story Company.

 

The exciting thing about Netflix being in charge, is they are actually doing their homework and making sure that they know what they’re doing. They even have an entire team dedicated to reading over the material they are adapting.

 

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Kelly Luegenbiehl, VP Creative for Netflix International Originals | Image via Hollywood Reporter

 

“We have development teams who are reading all night and every weekend,” said Kelly Luegenbiehl, VP of creative for international originals at Netflix.

 

Joanna Volpe, Founder, President, and Literary Agent at New Leaf. | Image via New Leaf Literary

 

“Netflix executives can discuss the books in-depth,” said New Leaf Literary founder Joanna Volpe. “That’s why we are seeing such great adaptations: because they are reading it and getting to the heart of the books.”

 

 

 

 

Featured Image via Reedsy