Katerina reading 10 Things I Hate About You

Monday Motivation: The Three Books You Need to Read This Week

There are so many wonderful books in the world and with more published every week it can be hard to know where to start, especially on Mondays when everything is ten times harder than it usually is. So let us do the work for you. Here are the three books you need to be reading this week. You’re welcome. 

 

What:

 

The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolizter

 

Image Via Publishers Weekly

Image Via Publishers Weekly

 

Synopsis: 

 

Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank, dazzlingly persuasive and elegant at sixty-three, has been a central pillar of the women’s movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer- madly in love with her boyfriend, Cory, but still full of longing for an ambition that she can’t quite place- feels her inner world light up. And then, astonishingly, Faith invites Greer to make something out of that sense of purpose, leading Greer down the most exciting path of her life as it winds toward and away from her meant-to-be love story with Cory and the future she’d always imagined. (Via Amazon

 

Why?

 

Despite this being her twelfth book for adults, The Female Persuasion has prompted speculation that Wolitzer’s moment has finally come. She took on sexism in the publishing industry in her essay for the New York Times Book Review, “The Second Shelf: On the Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women,” and many articles have, since the publication of The Female Persuasion, noted that Wolitzer isn’t just as good as quintessential American novelists like Jonathan Franzen and Jeffrey Eugenides, she is, in fact, better. Nicole Kidman is set to star as Faith in the adaptation of the book, so get reading before it hits cinemas! The adaptation will be produced by Kidman’s production company Blossom Films, which also produces Big Little Lies. According to Entertainment Weekly, Kidman hinted last week at developing the project and posted on Instagram that she “didn’t need to be persuaded” to adapt the novel.

 

What:

 

The Power by Naomi Alderman

 

Image Via SheThePeople

Image Via SheThePeople

 

Synopsis: 

 

In The Power, the world is a recognizable place: there’s a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power–they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

The Power is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways. (Via Amazon)

 

Why?

 

With the film adaptation of Alderman’s novel Disobedience, starring Rachel Weisz and Rachael McAdams, coming out in the US this week, plus a TV show of The Power in the works, Alderman, winner of the Baileys Prize for Women’s Fiction among other accolades, is already enjoying a fair amount of success. She was named one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists in 2013, and was mentored by none other than The Handmaid’s Tale author Margaret Atwood. She’s definitely one to read before these two adaptations hit the screens! (Also I saw a woman reading The Power on my train this morning and she looked pretty engrossed.)

 

What:

 

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler

 

Image Via Electric Literature

Image Via Electric Literature

 

Synopsis: 

 

Newly arrived in New York City, twenty-two-year-old Tess lands a job working front of house at a celebrated downtown restaurant. What follows is her education: in champagne and cocaine, love and lust, dive bars and fine dining rooms, as she learns to navigate the chaotic, enchanting, punishing life she has chosen. The story of a young woman’s coming-of-age, set against the glitzy, grimy backdrop of New York’s most elite restaurants, in Sweetbitter Stephanie Danler deftly conjures the nonstop and high-adrenaline world of the food industry and evokes the infinite possibilities, the unbearable beauty, and the fragility and brutality of being young and adrift. (Via Amazon)

 

Why?

 

Ads for the STARZ TV adaptation of Danler’s first novel are plastered on billboards and buses all over New York right now, and the young author is only set to get bigger so you better read Sweetbitter before it’s spoiled for you, because it will be spoiled for you. People are already digging this book in a big way, and they are going to go nuts for the TV show. Danler’s novel is written based on her own experiences working in the high end service industry in New York, and she even landed her agent when she served him in the restaurant where she worked! Danler adapted the screenplay herself for Brad Pitt’s Plan B production company. 

 

Featured Image Via Tumblr.