‘Hunger Games’ Prequel Reveals The Mockingjay’s TRUE Meaning

I don’t know about you, but I actually haven’t made a serious dent in my copy of the prequel novel despite having gotten it just over a week ago … but already we’re getting some serious spoiler-y content on the internet!

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Alright, my fellow THG fans: I don’t know about you, but I actually haven’t made a serious dent in my copy of the prequel novel despite having gotten it just over a week ago – I’m too ashamed to even say how far I’d gotten in it – but already we’re getting some serious spoiler-y content on the internet!

 

 

 

 

Just telling you all right now: this piece will specifically be on the true significance behind the mockingjay, given the added context provided by the prequel and this article on the subject by ScreenRant if you want to read more about it, so needless to say…

*Spoiler warning for The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes ahead!

 

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Image via Barnes & Noble

 

Now, if you remember my article back in October of last year in which I listed out my general predictions on what the prequel could be about, I stated that based on the then-newly revealed title alone, the prequel would very likely be exploring the origin of the mockingjays, on top of the info we already got from the main books, and of course from a certain deleted scene from the Catching Fire movie (a clip which I unfortunately can’t find). Well, let me just say: I so called it!

I knew it would be just a layer of extra meaning to the fictional bird, but the info I found out on it from ScreenRant turns out to be so much better – and far more ironic – then I could’ve ever imagined: while we knew that mockingjays happened to be the crossbreeds of male jabberjays – the Capitol’s genetic invention, or muttations, created to spy on the rebels during the war – and female mockingbirds, another reason as to why Snow saw them as a threat from the rebels, a symbol of the rebellion that Katniss will eventually lead, is actually quite personal

 

 

 

 

The Capitol’s hatred of mockingjays grew from whenever the birds would gather round District 12 executions and pick up on victims’ last words to only later repeat back – resulting in this common saying: “It’s not over until the mockingjay sings”; and for Snow, his hatred in particular stemmed from his association of the birds with one Lucy Gray, a singer from District 12 he adored, whose songs were often replicated in mockingjay song, but when realizing his character, she abandoned him forever – and possibly even died in a winter storm.

Try rereading the main books the same way now! Just knowing that Snow – Coriolanus in his younger days – had a potential love-interest who straight up left him because of who he was (and honestly, who could blame her?) and exponentially fueled his hatred for mockingjays because of it… I mean, wow. And also, for the Capitol, the birds were mainly a constant reminder for them that even the ones they were executing – traitors and the like – were deep down still human, just from hearing the victims’ last words being chirped back to them.

 

 

 

 

Now we see just why Katniss just got under Snow’s skin so much… And you would think that because of his poor upbringing, trying to survive just like Katniss – albeit in the Capitol – he would have a better way to go about things… but put a Harry Potter spin on this and compare Katniss and Snow to Harry and Voldemort: both similar upbringings, but two vastly different worldviews, which makes all the difference…

This is definitely something for me to look forward to actually reading about in the book, so if you’ll excuse me, I’m gonna jump right back in before I see any more spoilers…

 

 

Featured Image via The Hunger Games Wiki – Fandom