percy jackson

Here’s What to Read if You Love Mythology

We’ve all heard mythological tales of monsters and guardians, good versus evil and so on from our parents and grandparents, regardless of what culture we grew up in.  Stories of gods, angels, and other worlds are commonplace. Mythological worlds act as a strong base for memorable fictional worlds created by authors.

 

Modern mythological fiction provides an unseen, complex, deep and often dark sides of these mythological worlds. 

 

Here are what I believe to be some of the best, most engrossing works of mythological fiction.

 

1. The Percy Jackson Series by Rick Riordan 

 

Image Via How to Read Me

Image Via How to Read Me

 

Ordinary boy Percy Jackson finds out that the Greek Gods are not just real, but he is the son the son of Poseidon; a big responsibility rests upon the young shoulders. 

Author Rick Riordan blends the ancient Greek Myths with the modern day in a perfect harmony, the formal behind his critically acclaimed success. He also wrote about Egyptian and Norse Mythology in a similar fashion.

 

2. Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

 

Image Via Goodreads

Image Via Goodreads 

 

Neil Gaiman has gathered the great Norse myths, which have inspired countless modern cultures, and retold them unlike ever before, from the dawn the the world to the halls of Valhalla.

The collection of these myths by Gaiman was somewhat essential since unlike all other forms of mythologies, Norse myths had not be compiled in any ancient scriptures. So this book acts as a hub, a compilation of the Norse Myths. 

 

3. Shiva Trilogy by Amish Tripathi  

 

Image Via Deccan Chronicle

Image Via Deccan Chronicle

 

Shiva is one of the three main Hindu Deities. Amish imagines Shiva as a common man, and depicts his journey and rise to Godhood. Set in the Indus Valley Civilization, the world’s oldest civilization, the trilogy blends history, fiction and mythology, while exploring the lives of various less-known gods, their contributions to the world and their rise to Godhood with Shiva.

 

4. The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

 

Image Via raseef5.com

Image Via raseef5.com

 

I am not certain if this book belongs in this list or is it perhaps the parent of the genre. Dante’s The Divine Comedy  is a 14th-century three-part poem, beginning with Dante’s Inferno. Dante is led through Hell, guided by the ancient Roman poet Virgil in the first poem. It is followed by Purgatorio and Paradiso which tour purgatory and paradise. 

The Divine Comedy has had a lasting effect on the literature and philosophy of the world. In fact, many of depictions of Hell and Paradise common in art and literature originate from this very poem. 

 

 

Featured Image Via How to Read Me