Here’s Our List of Awesome Authors’ Memoirs and Biographies!

  Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are memoirs and biographies! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!   5. educated by Tara Westover   Image via Amazon   Educated by Tara Westover tells the incredibly true story of Tara’s journey through the world of education. Hailing from the mountains of Idaho, Tara was isolated from mainstream society and when she entered a classroom for the first time, she was seventeen …

Book Culture

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are memoirs and biographies! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

5. educated by Tara Westover

 

Image via Amazon

 

Educated by Tara Westover tells the incredibly true story of Tara’s journey through the world of education. Hailing from the mountains of Idaho, Tara was isolated from mainstream society and when she entered a classroom for the first time, she was seventeen years old. Raised in a turbulent household, Tara decided to make something of herself. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home. This is a beautiful true story about rising from nothing and going against the system to prove you can do anything.

 

4. The Day went Missing by Richard Beard

 

Image via Amazon

 

The Day That Went Missing by Richard Beard is a tragic story that is not an easy read but a well written tale of dealing with an unspeakable loss. On a family holiday, Richard and his young brother Nicholas are playing in the ocean. Then, tragedy strikes when Nicholas disappears under the waves and drowns. Richard’s family doesn’t attend the funeral and he keeps returning to the cottage, choosing to forget Nicky’s tragic death. Forty years later, Richard has become an acclaimed novelist and is determined to reclaim his lost childhood. He begins a pain staking journey to recreate the day of the accident and recover his brother in some small way through memory.

 

3. All you can ever know by Nicole Chung 

 

Image via Amazon

 

All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung tells the tale of her trans-racial heritage and her quest to track down her birth mother. Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a trans-racial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up―facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn’t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from―she wondered if the story she’d been told was the whole truth. With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child.

 

2. Who Drowns the Flowers in Your Mouth by Rigoberto Gonzalez 

 

Image via Amazon

 

Who Drowns the Flowers in Your Mouth by Rigoberto Gonzalez is a beautifully written book by a poet. Burdened by poverty, illiteracy, and vulnerability as Mexican immigrants to California’s Coachella Valley, three generations of González men turn to vices or withdraw into depression. As brothers Rigoberto and Alex grow to manhood, they are haunted by the traumas of their mother’s early death, their lonely youth, their father’s desertion, and their grandfather’s invective. Rigoberto’s success in escaping―first to college and then by becoming a writer―is blighted by his struggles with alcohol and abusive relationships, while Alex contends with difficult family relations, his own rocky marriage, and fatherhood. Descending into a dark emotional space that compromises their mental and physical health, the brothers eventually find hope in aiding each other. This is an honest and revealing window into the complexities of Latino masculinity, the private lives of men, and the ways they build strength under the weight of grief, loss, and despair.

 

1. Solitary by Albert Woodfox 

 

Image via Amazon

Solitary by Albert Woodfox is the unforgettable life story of a man who served more than four decades in solitary confinement―in a six foot by nine foot cell, twenty-three hours a day, in a notorious Angola prison in Louisiana―all for a crime he did not commit. That Albert Woodfox survived was, in itself, a feat of extraordinary endurance against the violence and deprivation he faced daily. That he was able to emerge whole from his odyssey within America’s prison and judicial systems is a triumph of the human spirit, and makes his book a clarion call to reform the inhumanity of solitary confinement in the U.S. and around the world. Remarkably self-aware, that anger or bitterness would have destroyed him in solitary confinement. But sustained by the shared solidarity of two fellow Panthers, Albert turned his anger into activism and resistance. This book is an ode to prisoners and a showcase of incredible resilience that turns to strength.

 

Featured Image Via Amazon