feminism

Feminist Presses Gaining Strength in U.S. Publishing Industry

Are you familiar with feminist presses? Their mission is to advance women’s rights and amplify feminist perspectives. They publish works from minority writers, such as women of color and LGBTQ authors. By doing so, they empower the writers whose voices are underrepresented to have their concerns addressed, and produce an arsenal of feminist discourse that can challenge the dominance of patriarchy. Publishers Weekly says: 

 

According to the University of Wisconsin’s Office of the Gender and Women’s Studies Librarian, there are approximately 20 feminist presses in the U.S., and most of them are niche and/or micro presses…their sales have surged in recent years and that they are feeling optimistic about the future

 

In the same article, PW introduced The Feminist Press (located in New York), the oldest feminist publishing house in the U.S., est. 1970. Jisu Kim, the senior marketing, sales, and publicity manager, reported that sales in 2017 were up 80% from 2015. 

 

The following books are the feminist best-sellers published by The Feminist Press:

 

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Images via Amazon

 

From the left to the right, they are:

 

Moreover, PW introduced another feminist press-Aunt Lute (located in San Francisco)-which has published multicultural feminist books since 1982, and it claimed that sales in 2017 were up 20% from 2015. 

 

The following books are the feminist best-sellers published by Aunt Lute:

 

AL

Images via Amazon

 

From the left to the right, they are:

 

Seal Press is another feminist press located in Berkeley California which was founded as an indie press in 1976 and sold to Avalon Publishing Group in 2001. In 2016, Seal Press became a Hachette imprint. The executive editor Laura Mazer said that the press has always remained true to its feminist origins. 

 

The following two are recommended by Mazer:

 

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Images via Amazon and Brookeaztell.com

 

From the left to the right, they are:

 

I’m happy to see this boom in feminist publishing industry. As the French feminist Hélène Cixous argued in her article “The Laugh of the Medusa” (1975), women should develop what Cixous called “Écriture féminine” (or “feminine writing”) by which women write themselves: their language, their bodies, their erotics, and their feelings. The power of Écriture féminine becomes a great weapon that challenges the violence of patriarchy.

 

Hey, let’s get copies of the above-mentioned feminist books and experience the power of Écriture féminine! BOOM!

 

 

Featured Image via GTL