Edwidge Danticat and Caribbean Relatability

Late last year, I had the unbelievable pleasure of meeting Haitian-American author, Edwidge Danticat. I had read her first novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, over the summer and she quickly became one of my favorite storytellers.   image via ny times   If I’m being quite honest, I fell in love with Danticat’s work, especially the relatability I feel in reading it. As a Caribbean-American woman, it’s rare that I find novels and stories that reflect things that I’m familiar with. Danticat must have heard me complaining because I can relate to a lot of her stories and their nuanced portrayals …

Book Culture Female Authors

Late last year, I had the unbelievable pleasure of meeting Haitian-American author, Edwidge Danticat. I had read her first novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, over the summer and she quickly became one of my favorite storytellers.

 

image via ny times

 

If I’m being quite honest, I fell in love with Danticat’s work, especially the relatability I feel in reading it. As a Caribbean-American woman, it’s rare that I find novels and stories that reflect things that I’m familiar with. Danticat must have heard me complaining because I can relate to a lot of her stories and their nuanced portrayals of island/immigrant life.

 

 

While I love all of Danticat’s work, I’m especially a sucker for New York Day Women, a short story from Danticat’s Krik?Krak! collection. The story follows Suzette, the adult daughter of Haitian immigrants, as she spies on and follows her mother around New York City. At one point in the story, Suzette’s mother mentions that clothes should not be given to Goodwill when they can be saved and shipped home. “We save our clothes for the relatives in Haiti,” she says. The line makes me instantly think of my own mother, who packs up old clothes to ship to Jamaica every so often.

 

image via edwidge dandicat

 

Can we just say that I love Edwidge Danticat? She gave me a place to see myself and my family in fiction. She has inspired me to write stories like my own without fear of not being accepted.

featured image via ebay


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