Celebrating Pride Month: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

Pride month occurs in the United States to mark the Stonewall riots which took place at the end of June 1969. From that moment on, pride events are held around the world after Bill Clinton proclaims June as “Gay & Lesbian Pride Month” in 1999. To celebrate this month I wanted to share one of the best LGBT fictions, Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo, which was published in 2019. After I will summarize the novel, I also share a list of LGBT novels.

 

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Evaristo is the first black and the first British person to win the Booker Prize for fiction. The tragedy and sufferings of black women are the focus of the book. The women who are featured in the book represent numerous generations of black women who are linked by identification, family, grief, and love. The majority of the women are single mothers who are depicted as striving for success in their lives. Amma has a daughter and is working hard to realize her dream of starting a theatre. She succeeds in her objectives after putting in a lot of work. Carole’s mother, like Amma, is a single mom as well. Latisha is again a single mother with three children to care for. She owns a food business to provide for her children’s needs.

 

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Some of the women are involved in homosexual relationships. For example, Bummi had a homosexual relationship with her employee and decided to disclose it in order to avoid being insulted. Dominique has a gay connection with Nzinga and leaves her family for her, but she subsequently abandons her when she discovers her domineering personality. Almost every character is employed in some capacity. Bummi owns a cleaning company, Latisha owns a grocery shop, and Amma owns a movie theatre. Shirley is a school teacher, and Dominique organizes a women’s art festival. Females are responsible for their families as well as their careers. The work depicts the universal challenges, aspirations, and tensions that women face. The work depicts all different types of women.

By giving each character the opportunity to narrate, the author has provided insight into the characters. The novel isn’t only about African women; it’s about all women, regardless of colour, class, or nation. Throughout the novel, Evaristo, through the struggles of characters, signifies the subversion and deconstruction of the norms and codifications of the “host land” which is the UK. Women characters with hyphenated identities, struggle with a biased and marginalizing mentality of the host land and try to retain their sense of belonging. Being non-conformist characters, their struggles provide the reader with an excellent insight into the subversion of the norms related to race, class, and gender and what it means to succeed in a patriarchal world as a woman. Thus, this novel emphasizes the accomplishments of characters as homosexual women and mothers of African descent and shows how never yielding against the norms eventuates in success.

Check out the list below for more LGBTQ+ recommended reads.

1. We Are Everywhere: Protest, power, and pride ın the hıstory of queer lıberatıon by Matthew Riemer and Leighton Brown

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2.FAIREST: A memoır BY MEREDITH TALUSAN

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3.STONE FRUIT BY LEE LAI

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4.LESS: A NOVEL BY SEAN ANDREW GREER

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5. UNDER THE UDALA TREES BY CHINELO OKPARANTA

IMAGE VIA AMAZON

 

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