three to read

Bookstr’s Three to Read for This Week 9/17

Monday always seems to come around too quickly, doesn’t it? Thankfully, that means we are back, too, and we’re bringing with us three great books for you to read this week. If you’re unsure about what book to pick up next, hopefully, this list will help you choose!

 

This week, our Hot Pick is the novel on the tip of everybody’s tongue is The Fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkein, , our Coffee Shop Read is The Golden Pawn by L.A. Chandlar and our Dark Horse is, aptly, Horse by Talley English. 

 

Our Hot Pick

The Fall of Gondolin by J.R.R. Tolkien

 

Image Via Bustle

Image Via Bustle

 

Synopsis: 

 

In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar: he is called the Lord of Waters, of all seas, lakes, and rivers under the sky. But he works in secret in Middle-earth to support the Noldor, the kindred of the Elves among whom were numbered Húrin and Túrin Turambar.

 
Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo’s desires and designs.

 
Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo’s designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon’s daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo.

 

Why?

 

Okay, so this both is and is not a new book. Yes, it has only just been published, however it was actually written while Tolkien was in hospital after the Battle of the Somme. Assembled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien, this Middle-earth based tale is a must-read for any fans of The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings and is billed as “the first real story” of Middle-earth. This gorgeous hardcover contains beautiful color illustrations by The Lord of the Rings artist Alan Lee that really enhance the reading experience. 

 

Its publication has come as a surprise to all, as when the last ‘new’ Tolkien book, Beren and Lúthien was published last year, Christopher Tolkien had described it in the  preface as “my last book in the long series of editions of my father’s writings”. We’re certainly glad they decided to go ahead with the publication of The Fall of Gondolin, and highly recommend it! 

 

 

Our Coffee Shop Read: 

The Golden Pawn: an Art Deco Mystery by L.A. Chandlar

 

Images Via Twitter

Images Via Twitter

 

Synopsis: 

 

November 1936. Mayor La Guardia’s political future buckles under a missing persons case in New York City. Simultaneously, Lane unravels devastating secrets in the outskirts of Detroit. As two crimes converge, judging friends from enemies can be a dangerous game . . .
 
Finally summoning the courage to face the past, Lane Sanders breaks away from her busy job at City Hall to confront childhood nightmares in Rochester, Michigan. An unknown assailant left Lane with scattered memories after viciously murdering her parents. However, one memory of a dazzling solid gold pawn piece remains—and with it lies a startling connection between the midwestern tragedy and a current mystery haunting the Big Apple . . .
 
Meanwhile, fears climb in Manhattan after the disappearance of a respected banker and family friend threatens the crippled financial industry and the pristine reputation of Lane’s virtuous boss, Mayor Fiorello “Fio” La Guardia. Fio’s fight to restore order leads him into more trouble as he meets a familiar foe intent on ending his mayoral term—and his life . . . 
 
Guided by overseas telegrams from the man she loves and painful memories, only Lane can silence old ghosts and derail present-day schemes. But when the investigation awakens a darker side of her own nature, will she and New York City’s most prominent movers and shakers still forge ahead into a prosperous new age . . . or is history doomed to repeat itself?

 

Why?  

 

L.A. Chandlar returns with another delicious historical mystery, seamlessly weaving aspects of historical fiction, mystery, thriller and romance into one brilliant novel, perfect for sinking your teeth into on a cozy day in a coffee shop! The Gold Pawn is the sequel to Chandlar’s 2017 debut The Silver Gun, but works perfectly well as a stand alone novel. 

 

The tale is perfect for anyone who loves the Art Deco period, and has a thing for intrigue. Check out the book trailer below, and don’t miss our Facebook Live interview with L.A. Chandlar on October 3rd at 1pm EDT. 

 

 

Our Dark Horse 

Horse by Talley English.

Image Via New Dominion Bookshop

Image Via New Dominion Bookshop

 

Synopsis:

 

The haunting debut of a plainspoken, utterly original new voice: a novel about a girl on the cusp of her teenage years, who is growing up faster than she ever hoped she would.

When Teagan’s father abruptly abandons his family and his farm, Teagan finds herself wading through the wreckage of what was once an idyllic life, searching for something–or someone–to hold on to. What she finds is Ian, short for Obsidian: the magnificent but dangerously headstrong horse her father left behind. But even as she grows close to Ian, patiently training him, trying to overcome her fear of him, Teagan is learning that life and love are fragile. With an unflinching eye and remarkable restraint, Talley English tells a piercing story about how families hold together and fall apart; about loss and grief; about friendship; about the blunt cruelty of chance; and, finally, about forgiveness.

 

Why?

Perhaps our most apt Dark Horse pick to date, Horse by Talley English is about a horse so dark his name is Obsidian. How could we not pick it?

 

I could leave it at that, but there’s so much more to say. Publishers Weekly call English “a talented writer whose strong, striking sentences compensate for the weaker aspects of the story,” while Kirkus Reviews note that “English’s stripped-down prose works well to convey Teagan’s increasing alienation.” We absolutely loved the pared back style of the prose, paired with the deep emotion of the situations and events that make up the narrative and we definitely think you should waste no time checking this out!