A Book About Tampons Just Won A Major Prize

The Cannes Lion International Festival of Creativity is a global event celebrating the best in communications and advertising. One of the biggest prizes of the event went to a book about tampons. The Tampon Book was self-published by The Female Company as a way to bring awareness to unfair tax discrimination for the product in Germany. The country considers tampons a “luxury good” and therefore taxed up to 19% for necessary hygiene products. In order to get around this rule, The Tampon Book was published. At only 42 pages featuring stories and illustrations of menstruation, the book also includes 15 …

Book Culture

The Cannes Lion International Festival of Creativity is a global event celebrating the best in communications and advertising. One of the biggest prizes of the event went to a book about tampons.

The Tampon Book was self-published by The Female Company as a way to bring awareness to unfair tax discrimination for the product in Germany. The country considers tampons a “luxury good” and therefore taxed up to 19% for necessary hygiene products. In order to get around this rule, The Tampon Book was published. At only 42 pages featuring stories and illustrations of menstruation, the book also includes 15 organic tampons packaged within. Since books are only taxed at 7%, the company found this to be a good way to get around the tampon tax.

 

Image Via The Female Company

 

The website where you can purchase the book also features a link to a petition on Change.org where you can put political pressure on Germany to reduce the tax. So far, the petition has garnered close to 175,000 signatures. Let’s see how many more it can get!

 

The Tampon Book won the PR Grand Prize at the festival. PR Grand Jury Chair Michelle Hutton explained why:

We believe that ‘The Tampon Book’ is a great example of modern communications. It combines creativity with the craft of public relations.

Of course, the phenomenon of gendered taxation extends far beyond tampons. This is the “Pink Tax,” a disproportionate cost for women’s services and products. Statistically, skincare products, shaving products, deodorant, and clothing are arbitrarily overpriced for female consumers.

A creative protest is always the best kind of protest.

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via New York Post