You Can Now Rent Hunter S. Thompson’s Cabin on AirBnb

You Can Now Rent Hunter S. Thompson’s Cabin on AirBnb

Good news for all you drug-addled gonzo journalists scouring the mountains of Colorado, near Aspen: you can now rent the cabin that Hunter S. Thompson lived in during the latter portion of his life.     The property is up on Airbnb for $550 a night. Thompson’s widow, Anita Thompson, is renting out the lodge to support the Hunter S. Thompson scholarship for veterans at Columbia University. Thomson referred to the cabin located on Owl Farm as his “fortified compound.” He spent his days there drinking, taking drugs, shooting guns, and, of course, writing. It was also the location where …

George R.R. Martin Commits to Staying in Cabin in Mountains Until ‘Winds of Winter’ Complete

George R.R. Martin Commits to Staying in Cabin in Mountains Until ‘Winds of Winter’ Complete

I know you and I are likely in the same boat of weary travelers waiting for the next installment of Game of Thrones. The final season of the television show is set to premiere in April, which will officially leave poor George R. R. Martin in the dust in terms of letting the series’ plot get away from him. But Martin has a plan to finally get the next book in the series, titled The Winds of Winter, onto shelves as soon as possible.   In a recent interview with Alexandra Wolfe for the Wall Street Journal, Martin communicated with her “from a remote mountain …

Fans of Harriet Beecher Stowe, The ‘Cabin’ of your Dreams is for Sale

Fans of Harriet Beecher Stowe, The ‘Cabin’ of your Dreams is for Sale

Disassembled and stored in a trailer twenty years ago, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s house has now been restored and placed online for sale.    Constructed in 1811, the Litchfield house served as abolitionist writer Harriet Beecher Stowe’s birthplace and residence until she reached 14. Eleven children lived under the its roof until it became a sanitarium, and was subsequently purchased by a private school.   Via the Hartford Courant   The Forman School sold this property for a puny one dollar in 1997, and it was later deconstructed for storage. The buyer had initially intended to establish a museum showcasing the early history of …