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5 Books That Almost Had Wildly Different Endings

Spoilers ahead!

So it may be that 'all's well that ends well,' but some of these books nearly didn't! The secret alternate endings of these five popular novels are different from the endings that made it to our bookshelves. (That's 'different' as a synonym for completely bizarre.) Some endings changed the tone of the story in ways the author decided against. Some endings changed other important things, like whether or not anyone would buy the book.

 

1. The Fault in Our Stars

 

'The Fault in our Stars' by John Green

 

It's hard to imagine John Green changing one thing about his devastating hit The Fault in our Stars (besides the title, which would work just as well as Buckets of Our Tears). Actually, Augustus' death was almost the second most tragic thing about the novel. In a twist that Green himself describes as "epically terrible," the novel initially ended with Hazel Grace and author Van Houten attempting to murder a drug dealer in order to honor Augustus' life... knowing that they will likely die (just relatable teenager things). This ending supposedly lasted only forty pages, which begs the question—what? It gets worse. Green also considered using the ending of the novel to explore the Trolley Problemwhich, to sum it up, asks whether it's more morally heinous to let a trolley crush five people or to personally divert the train to crush only one person. His editor admitted later that she "[couldn't] tell whether or not it [was] a joke." It wasn't. 

 

2. The Dream Thieves

 

'The Dream Thieves' by Maggie Stiefvater

 

Maggie Stiefvater's Raven Cycle series stands as one of the most positively critically reviewed YA series of all time. Its second book, The Dream Thieves, is particularly rife with the dark (best friends replaced with subservient clones) and the delightful (every possible use of 'Dick' as a nickname for Richard). In one earlier draft, troubled protagonist Ronan enters into a magical drag race with distinctly-more-troubled antagonist Kavinskywhich, contextually, is not as strange as it sounds. The two subsequently have their magic race up the side of a mountain, and in a reckless but astoundingly unsurprising move, Kavinsky drives his car off the edge of a cliff. Stiefvater herself summarizes the whole plot as: "Fireball! Death!" This is also an excellent description of the novel's actual ending. However, this earlier draft lacks the redemptive elements and positive LGBT representation of the rewriteespecially since the rewrite is also full of cars and danger.

 

3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

 

'Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows' by J.K. Rowling

 

One of the most chilling lines in the Harry Potter universe reads: neither can live while the other survives. It would then logically follow that... to use J.K.'s own words... neither can live while the other survives. So it doesn't exactly add up that J.K. Rowling almost concluded her series with Voldemort AND Harry surviving. In one strange version of the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows ending, the spirits of Voldemort's dead parents appear during their showdown to comfort Harry and turn Voldemort into a child. When Voldy tries to zap Harry with his final curse, it rebounds, freezing him as a living statue. If you're wondering how the rebounded spell doesn't kill him, you can keep on wonderingthere is no real explanation. Fortunately, we have the original standoff between Harry and Voldemort, as well as all the powerful scenes and lines that come with it. 

 

4. Thirteen Reasons Why

 

'Thirteen Reasons Why' by Jay Asher

 

Especially after its TV debut, Thirteen Reasons Why is almost universally recognizable as a story of the tragic suicide of a high school student and the following series of upsetting confessional tapes detailing fellow students' contributions to her death. But what if Hannah didn't die? According to author Jay Asher, that's exactly what almost happened. As the near-suicide of a close relative inspired Asher's work, he considered that Hannah might also live. In the end, he decided against it. He felt that Hannah's survival meant fewer consequences for the students who tormented her, as well as lower stakes surrounding the issue. Asher explained: "it felt false for this particular story and for the seriousness of the issue. If someone goes through with a suicide, there are no second chances for anyone involved." 

 

5. 1984

 

'1984' by George Orwell

 

We all recognize George Orwell's 1984 as the classic behind the phrase "Big Brother is watching." Fewer people know that this grim tale once had an alternate endingone that made the ending tonally more optimistic (not an easy feat, given how depressing this story gets). Free-thinking Winston undergoes torture in order to destroy any part of him that might rebel against the novel's totalitarian government. But just before the end, he has a brief nervous break and thinks to himself: 2 + 2 = 5. This signifies the extent to which Winston, wholly indoctrinated, now accepts Big Brother's lies. However, Orwell's first edition tells a different story. There, the sentence ends with 2 +2 = (without the number 5), implying that Winston manages to hold onto some sense of self and that resistance is real. One letter subtly but unmistakably changes the meaning of the entire novel... and makes it a whole lot sadder.

 

 

 

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