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15 Cant-Miss Book Releases in March

Kazuo Ishiguros first novel in ten years, Lauren Olivers latest YA release, and more are sure to get you reading this month.

With so many great titles in March, we’ve narrowed it down to 15 must-reads. Biographies, memoirs, popular fiction, thrillers, and more all make the list, with a few exceptional standouts including Kazuo Ishiguro’s new novel The Buried Giant. The Unloved by Deborah Levy dives into desire and the nature of identity, while Jon Ronson’s So You’ve Been Publically Shamed will make you think about the blame-game. Want a sharp and witty look at two politically powerful Roosevelt cousins? Hissing Cousins is sure to satisfy. See all of our picks below and let us know what you’re excited to read.

The Bookseller by Cynthia Swanson

Courtesy of Harper Collins

Release Date: March 3

The Bookseller blurs the lines between fiction and reality as content bookshop owner Kitty Miller dreams of a different life as Katharyn Andersson when she falls asleep. Although Kitty thought her routine, single life was enough—Katharyn’s husband, elegant home, and good friends get more enticing by the night.

The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro

Courtesy of Random House

Release Date: March 3

The author of Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day returns with his fantastic new novel, The Buried Giant. The story follows the journey of a couple through a troubled land of mist and rain in search for their son they haven’t seen in years.

The Sellout by Paul Beatty

Courtesy of Macmillan  

Release Date: March 3

Paul Beatty’s wit brings humor to an otherwise serious situation, as he confronts race, urban life, the father-son relationship, and other controversial topics in his new book. The result is satire that is as funny as it is somber.

The Unloved by Deborah Levy

Courtesy of Bloomsbury

Release Date: March 3

After a group of tourists from various countries gather to celebrate the holidays in a remote French chateau, a woman is brutally murdered. A child Tatiana claims to know who has done it, and so the books dives into an investigation of more than just the death—but into the nature of identity, love, rage, and desire.

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Courtesy of Random House

Release Date: March 10

Yanagihara’s new story surrounds four classmates from a Massachusetts college and their lives after moving to New York together. Each has their own struggles, but they come to realize their greatest challenge is one of them—Jude. While Jude is a talented litigator, he is scarred by a terrible childhood and haunted by fear he may never be able to overcome.

All the Old Knives by Olen Steinhauer

Courtesy of Macmillan 

Release Date: March 10

Steinhauer takes readers into the world of the CIA in his new thrilling tale about two agents who suffered the tragic loss of hostages six years ago in Vienna. The other factor contributing to the tension? They were lovers at the time. Meeting for the first time since the incident, neither knows what will come of it but one thing is sure: they trust no one.

Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver

Courtesy of Harper Collins 

Release Date: March 10

This thrilling novel—part mystery, part sisterly love story—is one you won’t be able to put down. Dara and Nick were inseparable until an accident left Dara’s face permanently scarred. When Dara goes missing, Nick races to find her and uncovers mysteries and lies along the way.

Hausfrau by Jill Alexander Essbaum

Courtesy of Random House

Release Date: March 17

Jill Alexander Essbaum’s debut novel is real and intensely executed. Although Anna’s life in Zurich looks picture-perfect, she’s falling apart inside and becomes entangled in a series of affairs that she can’t seem to pull herself from. When her lies start to spin out of control, she has to confront where to go when there’s no going back.

An Uncomplicated Life by Paul Daughertry

Courtesy of Harper Collins 

Release Date: March 17

Paul Daughertry’s inspiring memoir of his daughter with down-syndrome gives the reader hope. Daughertry never wanted his daughter to grow up “needy”—and in turn helps her live a wonderful and normal life reminding us that parents can learn from their children as much as children learn from their parents.

Through the Wall by Anna Bligh

Courtesy of Harper Collins 

Release Date: March 23

The first woman to be elected Premier of an Australian State, Anna Bligh has overcome much. After leading Queensland through one of Australia’s largest natural disasters, her party lost in 2012 and soon after she was diagnosed with cancer. She reveals herself through honesty and humor in this candid memoir.

The Illuminations by Andrew O’Hagan

Courtesy of Macmillan

Release Date: March 24

This beautiful novel analyzes the stories and lies we tell ourselves to get by. Anne Quirk has told herself many fictitious tales to survive. Her grandson Luke, a captain with the Royal Western Fusiliers in the British army, has inherited her ability to distort reality. When a mission goes terribly wrong—he is forced to see the world anew. After returning to Scotland, lies and secrets emerge and Anne confronts a mystery from her past at the Blackpool Illuminations—which are lights that brighten the town in winter.

We All Looked Up by Tommy Wallach

Courtesy of Simon & Schuster 

Release Date: March 24

High school is rough enough without an asteroid hurtling towards you. Four high school seniors abandon their thoughts about the future and decide how they’re going to spend their last days before an asteroid with the potential to wipe out Earth hits in this interesting take on confronting the present. 

What Comes Next and How to Like It by Abigail Thomas

Courtesy of Simon & Schuster 

Release Date: March 24

Abigail Thomas’ memoir confronts what comes after her husband dies and how she should go about enjoying life. With the help of her life-long best friend, she’s able to answer many of her questions about life, love, and tragedy.

Hissing Cousins by Marc Peyser and Timothy Dwyer

Courtesy of Random House 

Release Date: March 31

Hissing Cousins is a dual-biography that looks at two very different Roosevelts’: Alice and Eleanor. Alice, the beautiful and outspoken daughter of Theodore Roosevelt, had quite a different agenda than Eleanor, the First Lady and do-gooder. Peyser and Dwyer show how their personalities and politics clashed in their book.

So You’ve Been Publically Shamed by Jon Ronson

Courtesy of Picador

Release Date: March 31

What would the world be like if we didn’t have someone to constantly blame? That’s what Jon Ronson explores in his book about public shaming. He talks to famous shamers and shamees, and the result is a thought-provoking book.